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Država Slovenaca, Hrvata i Srba
Држава Словенаца, Хрвата и Срба

Država Slovencev, Hrvatov in Srbov



State of Slovenes, Croats, and Serbs

1918

Flag

State of Slovenes, Croats, and Serbs
Capital Zagreb
Language(s) Slovene, Croatian, and Serbian
Government Republic
President¹ Anton Korošec
Vice presidents¹ Ante Pavelić
Svetozar Pribićević
Historical era World War I
 - Independence 29 October 1918
 - Joined Kingdom of Serbs, Croats and Slovenes 1 December 1918
¹ President and vice presidents of the National Council.
"Distribution of Races in Austria–Hungary" from the Historical Atlas by William R. Shepherd, 1911, showing areas mainly inhabited by Slovenes, Croats, and Serbs. Most of those territories were included in the State of Slovenes, Croats, and Serbs.

The State of Slovenes, Croats, and Serbs was a short-lived state formed from the southernmost parts of the Austro-Hungarian monarchy after its dissolution at the end of the World War I by the resident population of Slovenes, Croats, and Serbs. The state was internationally unrecognized.

Contents

Name

In Slovene, the State was known as Država Slovencev, Hrvatov in Srbov; in Serbian and Croatian as Država Slovenaca, Hrvata i Srba (Cyrillic: Држава Словенаца, Хрвата и Срба; pronounced [dr̩ˈʒaʋa sloˈʋenatsa xr̩ˈʋataɪ ˈsr̩ba]).

The Serbs referred to in the state's name were those resident in Bosnia and Herzegovina, Croatia-Slavonia (including Syrmia), and Dalmatia (including Boka Kotorska and Montenegrin Littoral up to Spič near Bar), not the population of the Kingdom of Serbia (which included the territory of the present-day Republic of Macedonia), nor the Serbs in Kingdom of Montenegro and Vojvodina region (including Banat, Bačka and Baranya) as those teritories were not included in the short lived state.

The verigar, designed by Ivan Vavpotič for the state's only postal stamp issue, became one of the symbols of the short-lived State of Slovenes, Croats, and Serbs.

History

The state was officially formed on 29 October 1918. Its governing body was the National Council (Narodno vijeće), composed ad hoc of influential politicians at the time. The president was a Slovene, Anton Korošec. The two vice presidents were a Serb, Svetozar Pribićević, and a Croat, Ante Pavelić (not to be confused with Ante Pavelić, the leader of the regime set up by the Axis Powers in Croatia in 1941).

The aspirations of the new state were to include all territories of the former Austria-Hungary that were inhabited by Slovenes, Croats, and Serbs. However, the Serbs in Vojvodina (including the Banat, Bačka, and Baranya regions) objected to this and formed their own administration under the supreme authority of the Serbian National Board in Novi Sad. Vojvodina then joined the Kingdom of Serbia on 25 November 1918. One day before this, on 24 November 1918, the region of Syrmia, which at first was part of the State of Slovenes, Croats, and Serbs, had seceded from the state and also joined the Kingdom of Serbia.

In order to avoid handing the navy to the Entente Powers, the Austrian Emperor gave the entire Austro-Hungarian Navy and merchant fleet, including all harbours, arsenals, and shore fortifications, to the National Council of the state. The National Council sent diplomatic notes to the governments of France, the United Kingdom, Italy, the United States, and Russia to notify them that the state was not at war with any of them and that the council had taken over the entire Austro-Hungarian fleet. The fleet, however, was soon attacked and dismembered by the Italian Regia Marina.

The State did not obtain international diplomatic recognition before it ceased to exist. On 1 December 1918, the National Council joined the state with the Kingdom of Serbia (which had just taken the Kingdom of Montenegro within its borders) to form the Kingdom of Serbs, Croats, and Slovenes.

See also

References

  • Vladimir Ćorović, Ilustrovana istorija Srba, knjiga šesta, Belgrade, 2006.
  • Drago Njegovan, Prisajedinjenje Vojvodine Srbiji, Novi Sad, 2004.

External links

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Država Slovenaca, Hrvata i Srba
Држава Словенаца, Хрвата и Срба
Država Slovencev, Hrvatov in Srbov
State of Slovenes, Croats, and Serbs
File:Flag of Austria-Hungary
1918 File:Flag of the Kingdom of Yugoslavia (civil).svg

File:State

Flag

State of Slovenes, Croats, and Serbs
Capital Zagreb
Language(s) Slovenian, Croatian, and Serbian
Government Republic
President¹Anton Korošec
Vice presidents¹Ante Pavelić
Svetozar Pribićević
Historical era World War I
 - Independence 29 October 1918
 - Joined Kingdom of Serbs, Croats and Slovenes 1 December 1918
¹ President and vice presidents of the National Council.

, 1911, showing areas mainly inhabited by Slovenes, Croats, and Serbs. Most of those territories were included in the State of Slovenes, Croats, and Serbs.]]

The State of Slovenes, Croats, and Serbs was a short-lived state formed from the southernmost parts of the Austro-Hungarian monarchy after its dissolution at the end of the World War I by the resident population of Slovenes, Croats, and Serbs. The state was internationally unrecognized.[citation needed]

Contents

Name

In Slovenian, the State was known as Država Slovencev, Hrvatov in Srbov; in Serbian and Croatian as Država Slovenaca, Hrvata i Srba (Cyrillic: Држава Словенаца, Хрвата и Срба; pronounced [dr̩ˈʒaʋa sloˈʋenatsa xr̩ˈʋataɪ ˈsr̩ba]).

The Serbs referred to in the state's name were those resident in Bosnia and Herzegovina, Croatia-Slavonia (including Syrmia), and Dalmatia (including Boka Kotorska and Montenegrin Littoral up to Spič near Bar), not the population of the Kingdom of Serbia (which included the territory of the present-day Republic of Macedonia), Kingdom of Montenegro, and Vojvodina (including Banat, Bačka, and Baranya).

File:Timbre Verigar 15 Slovenie SHS
The verigar, designed by Ivan Vavpotič for the state's only postal stamp issue, became one of the symbols of the short-lived State of Slovenes, Croats, and Serbs.

History

The state was officially formed on 29 October 1918. Its governing body was the National Council (Narodno vijeće), composed ad hoc of influential politicians at the time. The president was a Slovene, Anton Korošec. The two vice presidents were a Serb, Svetozar Pribićević, and a Croat, Ante Pavelić (not to be confused with Ante Pavelić, the leader of the regime set up by the Axis Powers in Croatia in 1941).

The aspirations of the new state were to include all territories of the former Austria-Hungary that were inhabited by Slovenes, Croats, and Serbs. However, the Serbs in Vojvodina (including the Banat, Bačka, and Baranya regions) objected to this and formed their own administration under the supreme authority of the Serbian National Board in Novi Sad. Vojvodina then joined the Kingdom of Serbia on 25 November 1918. One day before this, on 24 November 1918, the region of Syrmia, which at first was part of the State of Slovenes, Croats, and Serbs, had seceded from the state and also joined the Kingdom of Serbia.

In order to avoid handing the navy to the Entente Powers, the Austrian Emperor gave the entire Austro-Hungarian Navy and merchant fleet, including all harbours, arsenals, and shore fortifications, to the National Council of the state. The National Council sent diplomatic notes to the governments of France, the United Kingdom, Italy, the United States, and Russia to notify them that the state was not at war with any of them and that the council had taken over the entire Austro-Hungarian fleet. The fleet, however, was soon attacked and dismembered by the Italian Regia Marina.

The State did not obtain international diplomatic recognition before it ceased to exist. On 1 December 1918, the National Council joined the state with the Kingdom of Serbia (which already had merged with the Kingdom of Montenegro) to form the Kingdom of Serbs, Croats, and Slovenes.

References

  • Vladimir Ćorović, Ilustrovana istorija Srba, knjiga šesta, Belgrade, 2006.
  • Drago Njegovan, Prisajedinjenje Vojvodine Srbiji, Novi Sad, 2004.

See also

External links


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