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Steve Lavin

Title Head Coach
College Chapman University
Sport Basketball
Born September 4, 1964 (1964-09-04) (age 45)
Place of birth San Francisco, California, USA
Career highlights
Championships
1995 NCAA Division I Men's Basketball Championship (Asst. Coach)
1997 National Rookie Coach of the Year
1997 NABC Dist. 15 and USBWA Dist. 9 Coach of the Year

Six consecutive NCAA Tournaments (1997-2002)
1997 NCAA Elite 8
Five NCAA Sweet 16s in six seasons
1998 Final Four in San Antonio, he was the head coach of the West squad in the NABC All-Star Game
2001 Pacific-10 Coach of the Year honors

Awards
1997 International Inspiration Award from the Hugh O’Brien Youth Foundation (HOBY)
1998 Lavin was honored by his alma mater as the Chapman University Alumnus of the Year (also serves on Board of Governors at Chapman University)
1998 Honorary member of the Golden Key National Honor Society at UCLA
2005 Distinguished Alumni award from the Dodge College of Film and Media Arts from Chapman University
Coaching career (HC unless noted)
1988-1991
1991-1996
1996-2003
Purdue Assnt. Coach
UCLA Assnt. Coach
UCLA Head Coach

Steve Lavin (born September 4, 1964), a San Francisco native, is an American former college basketball coach and current ABC and ESPN TV analyst. As UCLA head basketball coach from 1996-2003, Lavin compiled a record of 145-78. In his inaugural season as head coach, Lavin directed the Bruins to the 1997 Pac-10 Championship and the NCAA Elite Eight with an overall record of 24-8.

As both an assistant and head coach, Lavin participated in 13 consecutive NCAA tournament appearances (1990-2002), while working at Purdue University and UCLA.

During Lavin's tenure as a head coach, he was one of only two coaches in the country, along with Duke's Mike Krzyzewski, to lead his team to five NCAA "Sweet 16s" in six years ('02, '01, '00, '98, '97). Lavin guided UCLA to six consecutive 20+ game winning seasons and to six consecutive NCAA tournaments. As head coach, his career record in the first two rounds of the NCAA Tournament is 10-1. Due to the recent firing of University of Iowa Head Basketball Coach Todd Lickliter, many Iowa Hawkeye fans have expressed interest in Lavin becoming their next head coach.

Contents

Background

Lavin's coaching career began in 1988 when he was hired as an assistant by legendary Big Ten Purdue head coach Gene Keady. After three years of picking up valuable experience on the Boilermaker’s staff, Lavin was offered an opportunity to come back west when UCLA head coach Jim Harrick hired him as a Bruin assistant in 1991. Lavin was an assistant coach on the Bruins 1995 National Championship team that finished with a 32-1 record.

UCLA Tenure

After spending five years as an assistant on the Bruins' staff, Lavin was promoted to head coach at UCLA shortly before the 1996 season. On November 6, 1996, UCLA head coach Jim Harrick was fired amid recruiting violations. Lavin initially replaced Harrick as an UCLA interim head coach for the 1996-1997 season. Later that same season, on Feb. 11, 1997, with the Bruins tied for first place in the Pac-10 with an 8-3 record, Lavin was rewarded by having the interim tag lifted to become UCLA’s 11th head coach in school history. After Lavin was named permanent head coach, the Bruins won their next 11 games, before being eliminated by the Minnesota Gophers in the NCAA Midwest Regional Final.

In March 2003, Lavin had his first losing season (10-19) as a head coach and was relieved of his duties. Throughout his final days as head coach, Lavin expressed only gratitude for his twelve-year association with UCLA.

Recruiting success

As head coach at UCLA, Lavin and his staff recruited and signed the No. 1 rated recruiting class in the country in 1998 and 2001. Lavin signed seven McDonald’s High School All-Americans. Seven of Lavin’s former Bruin recruits are currently roster members of NBA teams: Trevor Ariza (Houston Rockets), Matt Barnes (Orlando Magic), Baron Davis (Los Angeles Clippers), Dan Gadzuric (Milwaukee Bucks), Ryan Hollins (Minnesota Timberwolves), Jason Kapono (Philadelphia 76ers), and Earl Watson (Indiana Pacers). As a result, the Bruins have the longest collegiate streak in the country of consecutive years having a player drafted to the NBA.

Sweet 16

During Lavin’s tenure as head coach, the Bruins qualified for six consecutive NCAA Tournaments (1997-2002). During this period, Lavin became one of two coaches (along Duke’s Mike Krzyzewski) to have led his team to five NCAA Sweet 16s in six seasons. Lavin’s record in the first and second rounds of the NCAA tournament is 10-1. Lavin’s winning percentage (90.9%) in the first two rounds, is second only to Dean Smith in NCAA Tournament history.

In seven seasons as head coach Lavin’s record was 12-4 in games involving overtime. Additionally Lavin's Bruins had a 10-4 record against the rival USC Trojans. In one stretch (1997-2002) Lavin’s Bruins compiled nine consecutive overtime victories, including victories over Arizona, Cincinnati (2002 NCAA second round double overtime victory over No. 1 West Region seed), Kentucky, and over then #1 ranked Stanford).

Lavin’s Bruins team had a knack for knocking off #1 teams. Lavin lead his team to victory over the No. 1 team in the country in four consecutive collegiate seasons (Arizona ’03, Kansas ’02, Stanford ’01, and Stanford ’00).

ABC and ESPN TV career

In March 2003, after twelve years on the UCLA staff, Lavin had his first losing season (10-19) as a head coach and was relieved of his duties. Shortly thereafter, Lavin was signed to a multi-year contract with ESPN and ABC where he provides color commentary as both game and studio analyst. Lavin makes regular appearances on ESPN College GameNight and also provides color-commentary alongside his partner Brent Musburger at primetime college games around the country. Lavin is sharing with viewers his experienced coaching perspective and his lifelong love for college basketball and its rich history.

Lavin’s perspective was forged over 15 years as a Division I college basketball coach at both UCLA and Purdue University.

For the past three years, Lavin has provided color commentary and expertise on ESPN’s coverage of the NBA Pre Draft Camp as well as the NBA Draft in New York. He has also been a part of Jordan Classic Brand Basketball.

In April 2006 Steve Lavin strongly considered a return to the coaching ranks when presented with the opportunity to become head basketball coach of the North Carolina State University Wolfpack. Lavin chose to continue his broadcasting career and signed a new six year contract with ABC and ESPN that will keep him with the network through 2012.

His name has been mentioned as a candidate for a number of coaching positions, including Arizona, USF, California, Memphis, DePaul and others.

And with the recent resignation of Tim Floyd from USC, Lavin has been mentioned as a possible candidate for the Trojans head coaching position.

Personal/basketball family

On August 17, 2007, Steve Lavin married actress Mary Ann Jarou in Capri, Italy. Mary Ann Jarou's acting credits include: How I met Your Mother, General Hospital, Entourage, Brothers and Sisters, Secret Girlfriend, King of Queens. Lavin’s father, Cap Lavin, in 1992 was inducted into the San Francisco Prep Basketball Hall of Fame and is a 1997 inductee into the University of San Francisco Hall of Fame. He prepped at St. Ignatius where he was a three-time (1946-48) All-City performer. Cap was a three-year letterman (1950-52) and team captain at USF. While at USF, he played for two Hall of Fame coaches, Pete Newell (1949-50) and Phil Woolpert (1950-52). As a collegiate guard, Newell described Cap as a "ballhandler way ahead of his time, one of the great dribblers and passers in the game."

In 1997, Cap retired after 43 years as an English teacher (at Cal-Berkeley, San Francisco State and Dominican College), including 40 years at Sir Francis Drake HS. At Cal-Berkeley, Cap was co-founder and director of the University of California Bay Area Writing Project, which established the National Writing Center at Berkeley and over 200 writing centers at university sites throughout the U. S. and abroad.

Steve is the youngest of six children raised in a Catholic family. His sibilings are John, Mark, Suzanne, Kenneth, and Rachel. Steve Lavin’s brother-in-law, John Moore, is the head basketball coach at Westmont College in Santa Barbara and is married to Lavin’s sister, Rachel.

Philanthropy

Current Presidents Circle Member of Jimmy V Foundation. Lavin was the Keynote Speaker in both 2008 and 2009 at the Wisconsin Coaches Vs Cancer "Shooting For A Cure" Gala. The event is held annually in Wisconsin to raise funds in an effort to find a cure for cancer. Lavin has been an active supporter of Special Olympics, City of Hope and the Lily Claire Foundation. In conjunction with USO and "Operation Hardwood" Lavin along with a group of college coaches visited our US Troops in Yokosuka Japan in 2003. The visit to US military base in Yokosuka included youth basketball clinics for children from families that live on the base. Lavin serves as Current Board of Governors member at Chapman University.

Head coaching record

Season Team Overall Conference Standing Postseason
Steve Lavin (1996–2003)
1996–97 UCLA 24–8 15–3 1 NCAA Elite Eight
1997–98 UCLA 24–9 12–6 3 NCAA Sweet Sixteen
1998–99 UCLA 22–9 12–6 3 NCAA Round of 64
1999–00 UCLA 21–12 10–8 4 NCAA Sweet Sixteen
2000–01 UCLA 23–9 14–4 3 NCAA Sweet Sixteen
2001–02 UCLA 21–12 11–7 6 NCAA Sweet Sixteen
2002–03 UCLA 10–19 6–12 6
UCLA: 145–78 81–48
Total: 145–78

      National Champion         Conference Regular Season Champion         Conference Tournament Champion
      Conference Regular Season & Conference Tournament Champion       Conference Division Champion

See also

References

Preceded by
Jim Harrick
UCLA Head Men's Basketball Coach
1996–2003
Succeeded by
Ben Howland
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