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Stillwater, Oklahoma
—  City  —
Downtown Stillwater
Nickname(s): Cowboy Country
Motto: Where Oklahoma Began!
Location in the State of Oklahoma
Coordinates: 36°7′18″N 97°4′7″W / 36.12167°N 97.06861°W / 36.12167; -97.06861
Country United States
State Oklahoma
County Payne
Incorporated
Government
 - Mayor Nathan Bates
Area
 - Total 28.3 sq mi (73.3 km2)
 - Land 27.9 sq mi (72.1 km2)
 - Water 0.5 sq mi (1.2 km2)
Elevation 984 ft (300 m)
Population (2000)
 - Total 39,065
 - Density 1,402.7/sq mi (541.6/km2)
Time zone CST (UTC-6)
 - Summer (DST) CDT (UTC-5)
ZIP codes 74074-74078
Area code(s) 405
FIPS code 40-70300[1]
GNIS feature ID 1098541[2]
Website http://www.stillwater.org/

Stillwater is a city in and the county seat of Payne County, Oklahoma, United States.[3] The population was 39,065 at the 2000 census. Founded December 12, 1884 it was the first settlement in the Unassigned Lands.

The geographical position of Stillwater is located Northeast of the Oklahoma City Metropolitan Area though many consider it to be a satellite exburb of Oklahoma City, due to commuter patterns and other indicators. The city of Stillwater is marketing a new census for 2010,[4] implementing a program named "Count Stillwater"[5] to help utilize the students of Oklahoma State University to increase the official population. The census is estimating a population of over 50,000, which would qualify Stillwater as its own Metropolitan Statistical Area. The city of Stillwater is currently developing and implementing a program, named "Count Stillwater". This would attract a significant number of new businesses and restaurants to the City and continue to grow "Oklahoma's fastest growing city."

Contents

Geography

Stillwater is located at 36°7′18″N 97°4′7″W / 36.12167°N 97.06861°W / 36.12167; -97.06861 (36.121538, -97.068537),[6] 60 miles north-northeast of downtown Oklahoma City and 65 miles west of downtown Tulsa.

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 28.3 square miles (73.3 km²), of which, 27.9 square miles (72.1 km²) of it is land and 0.5 square miles (1.2 km²) of it (1.62%) is water.

Demographics

As of the census[1] of 2000, there were 39,065 people, 15,604 households, and 7,318 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,402.7 people per square mile (541.6/km²). There were 16,827 housing units at an average density of 604.2/sq mi (233.3/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 82.48% White, 4.30% African American, 3.89% Native American, 5.05% Asian, 0.04% Pacific Islander, 0.88% from other races, and 3.36% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 2.50% of the population.

There were 15,604 households out of which 20.8% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 36.1% were married couples living together, 7.7% had a female householder with no husband present, and 53.1% were non-families. 34.6% of all households were made up of individuals and 6.9% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.13 and the average family size was 2.81.

In the city the population was spread out with 15.2% under the age of 18, 38.2% from 18 to 24, 24.4% from 25 to 44, 13.6% from 45 to 64, and 8.7% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 24 years. For every 100 females there were 102.7 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 102.4 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $25,432, and the median income for a family was $41,938. Males had a median income of $31,623 versus $22,312 for females. The per capita income for the city was $15,789. About 12.6% of families and 27.3% of the population were below the poverty line, including 18.2% of those under age 18 and 8.9% of those age 65 or over.

Economy and culture

Oklahoma State University is the largest employer, biggest landowner, and cultural center of the city. Stillwater has undergone tremendous changes in the past decade with the opening of several new strip malls and shopping centers. More national chains are moving in to replace regional and locally owned businesses, fueled by the expanding population and bulging youth demographic. This trend has led to a decline in downtown Stillwater; however, some residents of Stillwater are advocating plans to revitalize the city's downtown area.

There is a thriving bar district near campus referred to as "The Strip." Although the Strip technically is only Washington Street between 6th Street (Highway 51) and University Street, colloquially it can also cover other bars within walking distance, such as the Stonewall Tavern or Eskimo Joe's. The national success of Stillwater bands No Justice, All-American Rejects, Cross Canadian Ragweed, Jason Boland, Other Lives, and Colourmusic hint at possibilities of seeing good local music at any of the bars or venues located there. In fact, "The Strip" music scene is referenced in Jason Boland's college-themed anthem, "Alright."

There is an industrial side to Stillwater that is sometimes overlooked. Rolling Stone and ESPN magazines are printed in Stillwater at the Quebecor World plant. One of the largest employers, Mercury Marine produces boat motors and stern drives, but has recently announced that they are closing their plant in Stillwater. The city is also headquarters to Kicker (audio), makers of audio electronics. An Armstrong Flooring plant produces flooring there and National Standard makes tire wire. Stillwater Milling is a large feed mill and wheat storage facility.

Unemployment is low and Stillwater continues to attract national attention as a desirable place to live with many former OSU students returning to raise their families or retire. Stillwater was rated by Golf Digest as one of the top ten best places to retire and play golf. An Oklahoma-based magazine has also recently rated Stillwater to be the "Friendliest City in Oklahoma."

When it existed, regional airline Lone Star Airlines was headquartered in Stillwater.[7]

Education

President of the United States George W. Bush Delivers Commencement Address at Oklahoma State University, 2006
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Post Secondary

CareerTech

Notable Residents

References

External links


Simple English

Stillwater, Oklahoma
—  City  —
Downtown Stillwater
Motto: Where Oklahoma Began!
Coordinates: 36°7′18″N 97°4′7″W / 36.12167°N 97.06861°W / 36.12167; -97.06861
Country United States
State Oklahoma
County Payne
Incorporated
Government
 - Mayor Roger L. McMillian
Area
 - Total 28.3 sq mi (73.3 km2)
 - Land 27.9 sq mi (72.1 km2)
 - Water 0.5 sq mi (1.2 km2)
Elevation 984 ft (300 m)
Population (2000)
 - Total 39,065
 Density 1,402.7/sq mi (541.6/km2)
Time zone CST (UTC-6)
 - Summer (DST) CDT (UTC-5)
ZIP codes 74074-74078
Area code(s) 405
FIPS code 40-70300[1]
GNIS feature ID 1098541[2]
Website http://www.stillwater.org/

Stillwater is a city in Payne County, Oklahoma, United States. The population was 39,065 at the 2000 census.

Stillwater is also the home of Oklahoma State University.

References


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