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Suri dynasty: Wikis

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د سوریانو واکمني
Suri dynasty
Flag_of_the_Mughal_Empire.svg
1540–1556  

The extent of the Suri dynasty (green)
Capital Delhi
Language(s) Pashto and Dari Persian
Religion Sunni Islam
Government Sultanate
History
 - Established 1540
 - Disestablished 1556

The Suri Dynasty (Pashto: د سوریانو واکمني) was founded by the powerful medieval Indian conqueror of Pashtun (Afghan) descent. Sher Shah, whose real name was Farid Khan defeated Mughal Emperor Humayun in the battle of Chausa on June 26, 1539 and again in the battle of Bilgram on May 17, 1540.

The dynasty was made-up of Afghans.[1][2][3][4][5] They ruled Delhi Sultanate between 1540 and 1556. Their rule came to an end by a defeat that led to restoration of the Mughal Empire.

Today, the Suris are part of the Pashtun tribal system and belong to the sub-groups of the Ghilzais.

Contents

Rulers of Suri dynasty

The 178 grams silver coin, Rupiya released by Sher Shah Suri, 1540-1545 CE, was the first Rupee [6][7]

See also

References

  1. ^ Encyclopedia Britannica - Sur Dynasty
  2. ^ Columbia Encyclopedia - Sher Khan
  3. ^ Sher Shah brief biography as ruler
  4. ^ Sher Shah Suri
  5. ^ Sher Shah Suri
  6. ^ Mughal Coinage Reserve Bank of India RBI Monetary Museum,
  7. ^ Rupee This article incorporates text from the Encyclopædia Britannica, Eleventh Edition, a publication now in the public domain..
  8. ^ Majumdar, R.C. (ed.) (2007). The Mughul Empire, Mumbai: Bharatiya Vidya Bhavan, ISBN 81-7276-407-1,p.83
  9. ^ Majumdar, R.C. (ed.) (2007). The Mughul Empire, Mumbai: Bharatiya Vidya Bhavan, ISBN 81-7276-407-1,pp.90-3
  10. ^ Majumdar, R.C. (ed.) (2007). The Mughul Empire, Mumbai: Bharatiya Vidya Bhavan, ISBN 81-7276-407-1,p.94
  11. ^ a b c Majumdar, R.C. (ed.) (2007). The Mughul Empire, Mumbai: Bharatiya Vidya Bhavan, ISBN 81-7276-407-1,pp.94-96

External links


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