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Susan Brownmiller (born February 15, 1935) is an American feminist, journalist, author, and activist. She is best known for her pioneering work on the politics of rape in her 1975 book Against Our Will: Men, Women, and Rape [1] Brownmiller argues that rape had been hitherto defined by men rather than women; and that men use, and all men benefit from the use of, rape as a means of perpetuating male dominance by keeping all women in a state of fear. The book received criticism from Angela Davis, who thought Brownmiller disregarded the part that black women played in the anti-lynching movement and that Brownmiller's discussion of rape and race became an "unthinking partnership which borders on racism".[1] In 1995 The New York Public Library selected Against Our Will as one of 100 most important books of the Twentieth Century.

Brownmiller also participated in civil rights activism, joining CORE and SNCC during the sit-in movement and volunteering for Freedom Summer in 1964, where she worked on voter registration in Meridian, Mississippi. Returning to New York, she began writing for The Village Voice and became a network TV newswriter at the American Broadcasting Company, a job she held until 1968. She first became involved in the Women's Liberation Movement in New York City in 1968, by joining a consciousness-raising group in the newly-formed New York Radical Women organization. Brownmiller went on to co-ordinate a sit-in against Ladies' Home Journal in 1970, began work on Against Our Will after a New York Radical Feminists speak-out on rape in 1971, and co-founded Women Against Pornography in 1979. She continues to write and speak on feminist issues, including a recent memoir and history of Second Wave radical feminism. In Our Time: Memoir of a Revolution (1999). Considered a radical in some circles, Brownmiller had a rivalry with main feminist leader Betty Friedan.

Books

  • Shirley Chisholm: A Biography (Doubleday, 1970)
  • Against Our Will: Men, Women, and Rape (Simon and Schuster, 1975/Fawcett Columbine 1993)
  • Femininity (Linden Press/Simon & Schuster, 1984)
  • Waverly Place (Grove Press, 1989)
  • Seeing Vietnam: Encounters of the Road and Heart (Harper Collins, 1994)
  • In Our Time: Memoir of a Revolution (Dial Press, 1999)

References

  1. ^ Davis, Angela Y. (1981). Women, Race & Class. Random House, Vintage Books. pp. 195, 198. ISBN 0-394-71351-6.  

External links

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Simple English

Susan Brownmiller (born February 15, 1935) is a radical feminist. She works as a journalist and activist. She is best known for her pioneering work on the politics of rape in Against Our Will: Men, Women, and Rape [1] (1975). Brownmiller says that rape has been defined by men rather than women until now. Men use rape as a means of continuing male dominance by keeping all women in a state of fear. All men benefit from this. Brownmiller also participated in civil rights activism. She joined CORE during the sit-in movement and volunteered for Freedom Summer in 1964. She first became involved in the Women's Liberation Movement in New York City in 1968. There she joined a consciousness-raising group in the newly-formed New York Radical Women organization. Brownmiller went on to co-ordinate a sit-in against Ladies' Home Journal in 1970, began work on Against Our Will after a New York Radical Feminists speak-out on rape in 1971, and co-founded Women Against Pornography in 1979. She continues to write and speak on feminist issues, including a recent memoir and history of Second Wave radical feminism, In Our Time: Memoir of a Revolution (1999).

As of 2005, she is an Adjunct Professor of Women's & Gender Studies at Pace University in New York City,[2]

References

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