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Taste receptor, type 2, member 38
Identifiers
Symbols TAS2R38; PTC; T2R61
External IDs OMIM607751 MGI2681306 HomoloGene47976 GeneCards: TAS2R38 Gene
Orthologs
Species Human Mouse
Entrez 5726 387513
Ensembl ENSG00000183609 ENSMUSG00000058250
UniProt P59533 A0PK79
RefSeq (mRNA) NM_176817 NM_001001451
RefSeq (protein) NP_789787 NP_001001451
Location (UCSC) Chr 7:
141.32 - 141.32 Mb
Chr 6:
40.54 - 40.54 Mb
PubMed search [1] [2]

TAS2R38 is a bitter taste receptor[1][2] which facilitates the tasting of phenylthiocarbamide (PTC)[3] and propylthiouracil (PROP),[4] although it does not explain supertasting.[5]

Contents

References

  1. ^ Conte C, Ebeling M, Marcuz A, Nef P, Andres-Barquin PJ (2002). "Identification and characterization of human taste receptor genes belonging to the TAS2R family". Cytogenet. Genome Res. 98 (1): 45–53. doi:10.1159/000068546. PMID 12584440. 
  2. ^ Drayna D, Coon H, Kim UK, Elsner T, Cromer K, Otterud B, Baird L, Peiffer AP, Leppert M (2003). "Genetic analysis of a complex trait in the Utah Genetic Reference Project: a major locus for PTC taste ability on chromosome 7q and a secondary locus on chromosome 16p". Hum. Genet. 112 (5-6): 567–72. doi:10.1007/s00439-003-0911-y. PMID 12624758. 
  3. ^ Prodi DA, Drayna D, Forabosco P, Palmas MA, Maestrale GB, Piras D, Pirastu M, Angius A (2004). "Bitter taste study in a sardinian genetic isolate supports the association of phenylthiocarbamide sensitivity to the TAS2R38 bitter receptor gene". Chem. Senses 29 (8): 697–702. doi:10.1093/chemse/bjh074. PMID 15466815. 
  4. ^ Duffy VB, Davidson AC, Kidd JR, Kidd KK, Speed WC, Pakstis AJ, Reed DR, Snyder DJ, Bartoshuk LM (2004). "Bitter receptor gene (TAS2R38), 6-n-propylthiouracil (PROP) bitterness and alcohol intake". Alcohol. Clin. Exp. Res. 28 (11): 1629–37. doi:10.1097/01.ALC.0000145789.55183.D4.. PMID 15547448. 
  5. ^ Hayes JE, Bartoshuk LM, Kidd JR, Duffy VB (2008). "Supertasting and PROP Bitterness Depends on More Than the TAS2R38 Gene". Chem Senses 33 (3): 255–65. doi:10.1093/chemse/bjm084. PMID 18209019. 

Further reading

  • Margolskee RF (2002). "Molecular mechanisms of bitter and sweet taste transduction.". J. Biol. Chem. 277 (1): 1–4. doi:10.1074/jbc.R100054200. PMID 11696554. 
  • Montmayeur JP, Matsunami H (2002). "Receptors for bitter and sweet taste.". Curr. Opin. Neurobiol. 12 (4): 366–71. doi:10.1016/S0959-4388(02)00345-8. PMID 12139982. 
  • Kim UK, Drayna D (2005). "Genetics of individual differences in bitter taste perception: lessons from the PTC gene.". Clin. Genet. 67 (4): 275–80. doi:10.1111/j.1399-0004.2004.00361.x. PMID 15733260. 
  • Anne-Spence M, Falk CT, Neiswanger K, et al. (1984). "Estimating the recombination frequency for the PTC-Kell linkage.". Hum. Genet. 67 (2): 183–6. doi:10.1007/BF00272997. PMID 6745938. 
  • Bufe B, Hofmann T, Krautwurst D, et al. (2002). "The human TAS2R16 receptor mediates bitter taste in response to beta-glucopyranosides.". Nat. Genet. 32 (3): 397–401. doi:10.1038/ng1014. PMID 12379855. 
  • Strausberg RL, Feingold EA, Grouse LH, et al. (2003). "Generation and initial analysis of more than 15,000 full-length human and mouse cDNA sequences.". Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 99 (26): 16899–903. doi:10.1073/pnas.242603899. PMID 12477932. 
  • Zhang Y, Hoon MA, Chandrashekar J, et al. (2003). "Coding of sweet, bitter, and umami tastes: different receptor cells sharing similar signaling pathways.". Cell 112 (3): 293–301. doi:10.1016/S0092-8674(03)00071-0. PMID 12581520. 
  • Conte C, Ebeling M, Marcuz A, et al. (2003). "Identification and characterization of human taste receptor genes belonging to the TAS2R family.". Cytogenet. Genome Res. 98 (1): 45–53. doi:10.1159/000068546. PMID 12584440. 
  • Kim UK, Jorgenson E, Coon H, et al. (2003). "Positional cloning of the human quantitative trait locus underlying taste sensitivity to phenylthiocarbamide.". Science 299 (5610): 1221–5. doi:10.1126/science.1080190. PMID 12595690. 
  • Drayna D, Coon H, Kim UK, et al. (2003). "Genetic analysis of a complex trait in the Utah Genetic Reference Project: a major locus for PTC taste ability on chromosome 7q and a secondary locus on chromosome 16p.". Hum. Genet. 112 (5-6): 567–72. doi:10.1007/s00439-003-0911-y. PMID 12624758. 
  • Scherer SW, Cheung J, MacDonald JR, et al. (2003). "Human chromosome 7: DNA sequence and biology.". Science 300 (5620): 767–72. doi:10.1126/science.1083423. PMID 12690205. 
  • Wooding S, Kim UK, Bamshad MJ, et al. (2004). "Natural selection and molecular evolution in PTC, a bitter-taste receptor gene.". Am. J. Hum. Genet. 74 (4): 637–46. doi:10.1086/383092. PMID 14997422. 
  • Pronin AN, Tang H, Connor J, Keung W (2005). "Identification of ligands for two human bitter T2R receptors.". Chem. Senses 29 (7): 583–93. doi:10.1093/chemse/bjh064. PMID 15337684. 
  • Prodi DA, Drayna D, Forabosco P, et al. (2005). "Bitter taste study in a sardinian genetic isolate supports the association of phenylthiocarbamide sensitivity to the TAS2R38 bitter receptor gene.". Chem. Senses 29 (8): 697–702. doi:10.1093/chemse/bjh074. PMID 15466815. 
  • Gerhard DS, Wagner L, Feingold EA, et al. (2004). "The status, quality, and expansion of the NIH full-length cDNA project: the Mammalian Gene Collection (MGC).". Genome Res. 14 (10B): 2121–7. doi:10.1101/gr.2596504. PMID 15489334. 
  • Fischer A, Gilad Y, Man O, Pääbo S (2005). "Evolution of bitter taste receptors in humans and apes.". Mol. Biol. Evol. 22 (3): 432–6. doi:10.1093/molbev/msi027. PMID 15496549. 
  • Go Y, Satta Y, Takenaka O, Takahata N (2006). "Lineage-specific loss of function of bitter taste receptor genes in humans and nonhuman primates.". Genetics 170 (1): 313–26. doi:10.1534/genetics.104.037523. PMID 15744053. 

See also

External links

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