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Taste receptor, type 2, member 50
Identifiers
Symbols TAS2R50; MGC138305; T2R51
External IDs OMIM609627 HomoloGene88474 GeneCards: TAS2R50 Gene
Orthologs
Species Human Mouse
Entrez 259296 n/a
Ensembl n/a n/a
UniProt n/a n/a
RefSeq (mRNA) NM_176890 n/a
RefSeq (protein) NP_795371 n/a
Location (UCSC) n/a n/a
PubMed search [1] n/a

Taste receptor type 2 member 50 is a protein that in humans is encoded by the TAS2R50 gene.[1][2][3][4]

TAS2R50 belongs to the large TAS2R receptor family. TAS2Rs are expressed on the surface of taste receptor cells and mediate the perception of bitterness through a G protein-coupled second messenger pathway (Conte et al., 2002). See also TAS2R10 (MIM 604791).[supplied by OMIM][4]

See also

References

  1. ^ Bufe B, Hofmann T, Krautwurst D, Raguse JD, Meyerhof W (Oct 2002). "The human TAS2R16 receptor mediates bitter taste in response to beta-glucopyranosides". Nat Genet 32 (3): 397-401. doi:10.1038/ng1014. PMID 12379855.  
  2. ^ Conte C, Ebeling M, Marcuz A, Nef P, Andres-Barquin PJ (Feb 2003). "Identification and characterization of human taste receptor genes belonging to the TAS2R family". Cytogenet Genome Res 98 (1): 45-53. doi:10.1159/000068546. PMID 12584440.  
  3. ^ Shiffman D, Ellis SG, Rowland CM, Malloy MJ, Luke MM, Iakoubova OA, Pullinger CR, Cassano J, Aouizerat BE, Fenwick RG, Reitz RE, Catanese JJ, Leong DU, Zellner C, Sninsky JJ, Topol EJ, Devlin JJ, Kane JP (Sep 2005). "Identification of four gene variants associated with myocardial infarction". Am J Hum Genet 77 (4): 596-605. doi:10.1086/491674. PMID 16175505.  
  4. ^ a b "Entrez Gene: TAS2R50 taste receptor, type 2, member 50". http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/entrez?Db=gene&Cmd=ShowDetailView&TermToSearch=259296.  

Further reading

  • Margolskee RF (2002). "Molecular mechanisms of bitter and sweet taste transduction.". J. Biol. Chem. 277 (1): 1–4. doi:10.1074/jbc.R100054200. PMID 11696554.  
  • Montmayeur JP, Matsunami H (2002). "Receptors for bitter and sweet taste.". Curr. Opin. Neurobiol. 12 (4): 366–71. doi:10.1016/S0959-4388(02)00345-8. PMID 12139982.  
  • Strausberg RL, Feingold EA, Grouse LH, et al. (2003). "Generation and initial analysis of more than 15,000 full-length human and mouse cDNA sequences.". Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 99 (26): 16899–903. doi:10.1073/pnas.242603899. PMID 12477932.  
  • Zhang Y, Hoon MA, Chandrashekar J, et al. (2003). "Coding of sweet, bitter, and umami tastes: different receptor cells sharing similar signaling pathways.". Cell 112 (3): 293–301. doi:10.1016/S0092-8674(03)00071-0. PMID 12581520.  
  • Gerhard DS, Wagner L, Feingold EA, et al. (2004). "The status, quality, and expansion of the NIH full-length cDNA project: the Mammalian Gene Collection (MGC).". Genome Res. 14 (10B): 2121–7. doi:10.1101/gr.2596504. PMID 15489334.  
  • Fischer A, Gilad Y, Man O, Pääbo S (2005). "Evolution of bitter taste receptors in humans and apes.". Mol. Biol. Evol. 22 (3): 432–6. doi:10.1093/molbev/msi027. PMID 15496549.  
  • Go Y, Satta Y, Takenaka O, Takahata N (2006). "Lineage-specific loss of function of bitter taste receptor genes in humans and nonhuman primates.". Genetics 170 (1): 313–26. doi:10.1534/genetics.104.037523. PMID 15744053.  

This article incorporates text from the United States National Library of Medicine, which is in the public domain.

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