The Full Wiki

Tachinidae: Wikis

Advertisements
  
  

Note: Many of our articles have direct quotes from sources you can cite, within the Wikipedia article! This article doesn't yet, but we're working on it! See more info or our list of citable articles.

Encyclopedia

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Tachinidae
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Arthropoda
Class: Insecta
Order: Diptera
Subsection: Calyptratae
Superfamily: Oestroidea
Family: Tachinidae
Subfamilies
  • Dexiinae
  • Exoristinae
  • Goniinae
  • Phasiinae
  • Tachininae
Diversity
See List of Tachinidae genera and species

Tachinidae is a large and rather variable family of true flies within the insect order Diptera, with more than 8,200 known species and many more to be discovered. There are over 1300 species in North America. Insects in this family are commonly called tachina flies or simply tachinids.

They occur in almost all habitats all over the world. There are Neotropical, Nearctic, Afrotropical[1], Palaearctic, Oriental, Australasian and Oceanic species.

Larvae (maggots) of most members of this family are parasitoids (they develop inside a living host, ultimately killing it), and a few are parasitic (they do not kill the host). They are endoparasites (internal parasites) of caterpillars of butterflies and moths, adult and larval beetles, sawfly larvae, various types of true bugs and grasshoppers, and (rarely) centipedes, with usually only one grub. Only a few species are restricted to one host species. As such, many are important natural enemies of major pests. Some species are being used in biological pest control. Many important pests are suppressed by tachinids. Many species of tachinid flies have been introduced into North America from their native lands as biocontrols to suppress populations of alien pests.

Certain tachinid flies are, however, regarded as pests by silkworm rearers. One particularly noted silkworm pest is the Uzi fly (Exorista bombycis).

Reproductive strategies vary greatly between species. The female may lay white oval eggs on the skin of the host insect, or insert eggs into the host's body, or leave them in the host's environment, as for example on leaves, where the host will ingest them. Some tachinids that are parasitoids of stem-boring caterpillars deposit eggs outside the host's burrow, letting the larvae do the work of finding the host itself. In other species, the maggots use an ambush technique, waiting for the host to pass and then attacking it and burrowing into its body. The larvae feed on the host tissues.

Tachinid flies are extremely varied in appearance. Adult flies may be brilliantly colored and then resemble blow-flies (family Calliphoridae), or rather drab, and then resemble house flies. But tachinid flies are more bristly and more robust. They have three-segmented antennae, a diagnostically prominent postscutellum bulging beneath the scutellum (a segment of the mesonotum), and bare (sometimes plumose) arista. The calypters (small flaps above the halteres) are usually very large. Their fourth long vein bends away sharply.

Adult flies feed on flowers and nectar from aphids and scale insects. As many species typically feed on pollen, they can be important pollinators of some plants, especially at higher elevations in mountains where bees are relatively few.

The taxonomy of this family presents many difficulties. It is largely based on morphological characters of the adult flies, but also on reproductive habits and on the immature stage.

Gallery

Comparison of scutellum and postscutellum, Brachycera, Diptera  
Long Tongued Tachinid Fly, Genus Senostoma, feeding on a flower's nectar  
Tachina fly (Gonia capitata)  
Calypter location
Gymnosoma rotundatum  
Carcelia sp.  
Nowickia sp.  
Peleteria sp.  

References

External links

Advertisements

Wikispecies

Up to date as of January 23, 2010

From Wikispecies

Taxonavigation

Main Page
Cladus: Eukaryota
Supergroup: Unikonta
Cladus: Opisthokonta
Regnum: Animalia
Subregnum: Eumetazoa
Cladus: Bilateria
Cladus: Nephrozoa
Cladus: Protostomia
Cladus: Ecdysozoa
Phylum: Arthropoda
Subphylum: Hexapoda
Classis: Insecta
Cladus: Dicondylia
Cladus: Pterygota
Cladus: Metapterygota
Cladus: Neoptera
Cladus: Eumetabola
Cladus: Endopterygota
Superordo: Panorpida
Cladus: Antliophora
Ordo: Diptera
Subordo: Brachycera
Infraordo: Muscomorpha
Sectio: Schizophora
Subsectio: Calyptrata
Superfamilia: Oestroidea
Familia: Tachinidae
Subfamilia: Dexiinae - Exoristinae - Phasiinae - Tachininae

Name

Tachinidae Robineau-Desvoidy, 1830

References

  • Given, B.B. 1945: Tachinid parasites attacking melolonthid larvae in New Zealand. Transactions of the Royal Society of New Zealand, 75: 321-323.
  • O'Hara, James E. & D. Monty Wood, 2004, Checklist of the Tachinidae of America North of Mexico [1]
  • O’Hara, J.E., 2005, World Genera of the Tachinidae (Diptera) and their Regional Occurrence PDF
  • O’Hara, J.E.; Shima, H.; Zhang, C. 2009: ANNOTATED CATALOGUE OF THE TACHINIDAE (INSECTA: DIPTERA) OF CHINA. Zootaxa, 2190: 1-236. Abstract & excerpt PDF

Vernacular names

English: tachina flies
日本語: ヤドリバエ科
Wikimedia Commons For more multimedia, look at Category:Tachinidae on Wikimedia Commons.

Simple English

Tachinidae
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Arthropoda
Class: Insecta
Order: Diptera
Subsection: Calyptratae
Superfamily: Oestroidea
Family: Tachinidae
Subfamilies
  • Dexiinae
  • Exoristinae
  • Goniinae
  • Phasiinae
  • Tachininae

Tachinidae is a family of flies. There are over 8,200 species in this family. There are about 1,300 in North America. These flies are commonly known as tachina flies or tachinids.

They are found in almost all habitats all over the world. There are Neotropical, Nearctic, Afrotropical[1], Palaearctic, Oriental, Australasian and Oceanic species.

References

Error creating thumbnail: sh: convert: command not found
Look up Tachinidae in Wikispecies, a directory of species


Advertisements






Got something to say? Make a comment.
Your name
Your email address
Message