The Full Wiki

Tai languages: Wikis

Advertisements
  
  
  

Note: Many of our articles have direct quotes from sources you can cite, within the Wikipedia article! This article doesn't yet, but we're working on it! See more info or our list of citable articles.

Encyclopedia

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Tai
Geographic
distribution:
Southern China (esp. Guangxi, Guizhou, Yunnan), Southeast Asia
Genetic
classification
:
Kradai
 Tai
Subdivisions:
Northern
Central
Southwestern
ISO 639-2 and 639-5: tai
Taikadai-en.svg

Distribution of the Kradai language family.
The Tai languages are:      Northern Tai      Central Tai      Southwestern Tai

The Tai languages (Thai: ภาษาไต transliteration: p̣hās̛̄ātay) are a subgroup of the Kradai language family. The Tai languages include the most widely spoken of the Tai-Kadai languages, including standard Thai, the national language of Thailand, Lao or Laotian, the national language of Laos, Burma's Shan language, and Zhuang, a major language in southern Chinese province of Guangxi.

  • Northern Tai languages
  • Central Tai languages
  • Southwestern Tai languages (32)
    • Tai Ya (China)
    • Pu Ko (Laos)
    • Pa Di (China)
    • Tai Thanh (Vietnam)
    • Tày Sa Pa (Vietnam)
    • Tai Long (Laos)
    • Tai Hongjin (China)
    • Turung (India)
    • Yong (Thailand)
    • Southern Thai (Pak Thai) (Thailand)
    • East Central Tai languages (10)
      • Chiang Saen languages (10)
        • Tai Dam (Vietnam)
        • Northern Thai (Lanna, Thai Yuan) (Thailand, Laos)
        • Phuan (Thailand)
        • Thai Song (Thailand)
        • Thai (Thailand)
        • Tai Hang Tong (Vietnam)
        • Tai Dón (Vietnam)
        • Tai Daeng (Vietnam)
        • Tay Tac (Vietnam)
        • Thu Lao (Vietnam)
      • Lao-Phutai languages (4)
      • Northwestern Tai languages (9)

Comparison table

English Proto-Southwestern Tai[1] Thai Lao Lanna Isan Shan Tai Lü
air *lom /lom/ /lóm/ /lom/ /lom/ /lom4/ /lom/
city *mɯaŋ /mɯaŋ/ /mɯaŋ/ /mɯaŋ/ /mɯaŋ/ /mɤŋ4/ /mœŋ/
earth *?din /din/ /din/ /din/ /din/ /lǐn1/ /din/
fire *vai/aɯ /fai/ /fái/ /fai/ /fai/ /pʰaj4/ or /fai4/ /fai/
heart *čai/aɯ /hŭa tɕai/ /hǔa cài/ /hua tɕai/ /hua tɕai/ /ho1 tsaɯ1/ /hua tɕai/
love *rak /rák/ /hāk/ /hag/ /hag/ /hak5/ /hag/
water *naam /náːm/ /nȃm/ /nam/ /nam/ /nam5/ /nam/
English Proto-Southwestern Tai Thai Lao Lanna Isan Shan Tai Lü

Further reading

  • Brown, J. Marvin. From Ancient Thai to Modern Dialects. Bangkok: Social Science Association Press of Thailand, 1965.
  • Chamberlain, James R. A New Look at the Classification of the Tai Languages. [s.l: s.n, 1972.
  • Conference on Tai Phonetics and Phonology, Jimmy G. Harris, and Richard B. Noss. Tai Phonetics and Phonology. [Bangkok: Central Institute of English Language, Office of State Universities, Faculty of Science, Mahidol University, 1972.
  • Diffloth, Gérard. An Appraisal of Benedict's Views on Austroasiatic and Austro-Thai Relations. Kyoto: Center for Southeast Asian Studies, Kyoto University, 1976.
  • Đoàn, Thiện Thuật. Tay-Nung Language in the North Vietnam. [Tokyo?]: Instttute [sic] for the Study of Languages and Cultures of Asia and Africa, Tokyo University of Foreign Studies, 1996.
  • Gedney, William J. On the Thai Evidence for Austro-Thai. [S.l: s.n, 1976.
  • Gedney, William J., and Robert J. Bickner. Selected Papers on Comparative Tai Studies. Michigan papers on South and Southeast Asia, no. 29. Ann Arbor, Mich., USA: Center for South and Southeast Asian Studies, University of Michigan, 1989. ISBN 0891480374
  • Gedney, William J., Carol J. Compton, and John F. Hartmann. Papers on Tai Languages, Linguistics, and Literatures: In Honor of William J. Gedney on His 77th Birthday. Monograph series on Southeast Asia. [De Kalb]: Northern Illinois University, Center for Southeast Asian Studies, 1992. ISBN 1877979163
  • Gedney, William J., and Thomas J. Hudak. (1995). William J. Gedney's central Tai dialects: glossaries, texts, and translations. Michigan papers on South and Southeast Asia, no. 43. Ann Arbor, Mich: Center for South and Southeast Asian Studies, University of Michigan ISBN 0891480757
  • Gedney, William J., and Thomas J. Hudak. William J. Gedney's the Yay Language: Glossary, Texts, and Translations. Michigan papers on South and Southeast Asia, no. 38. Ann Arbor, Mich: Center for South and Southeast Asian Studies, University of Michigan, 1991. ISBN 0891480668
  • Gedney, William J., and Thomas J. Hudak. William J. Gedney's Southwestern Tai Dialects: Glossaries, Texts and Translations. Michigan papers on South and Southeast Asia, no. 42. [Ann Arbor, Mich.]: Center for South and Southeast Asian Studies, University of Michigan, 1994. ISBN 0891480749
  • Hudak, Thomas John. William J. Gedney's The Tai Dialect of Lungming: Glossary, Texts, and Translations. Michigan papers on South and Southeast Asia, no. 39. [Ann Arbor]: Center for South and Southeast Asian Studies, University of Michigan, 1991. ISBN 0891480676
  • Li, Fang-kuei. The Tai Dialect of Lungchow; Texts, Translations, and Glossary. Shanghai: Commercial Press, 1940.
  • Østmoe, Arne. A Germanic-Tai Linguistic Puzzle. Sino-Platonic papers, no. 64. Philadelphia, PA, USA: Dept. of Asian and Middle Eastern Studies, University of Pennsylvania, 1995.
  • Sathāban Sūn Phāsā Qangkrit. Bibliography of Tai Language Studies. [Bangkok]: Indigenous Languages of Thailand Research Project, Central Institute of English Language, Office of State Universities, 1977.
  • Shorto, H. L. Bibliographies of Mon-Khmer and Tai Linguistics. London oriental bibliographies, v. 2. London: Oxford University Press, 1963.
  • Tingsabadh, Kalaya and Arthur S. Abramson. Essays in Tai Linguistics. Bangkok: Chulalongkorn University Press, 2001. ISBN 9743472223

References

  1. ^ Thai Lexicography Resources
Advertisements

Advertisements






Got something to say? Make a comment.
Your name
Your email address
Message