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Taiwan
臺灣
台灣
Taiwan NASA Terra MODIS 23791.jpg
Taiwan is mostly mountainous in the east, with gently sloping plains in the west. The Penghu Islands are west of Taiwan.
Geography
LocationTaiwan.png
Location Pacific Ocean, 120 km (74.6 mi) off the coast of mainland China
Coordinates 23°46′N 121°0′E / 23.767°N 121°E / 23.767; 121
Area 35,980 km2 (13,892.0 sq mi) (38th)
Highest point Yushan (Jade Mountain) (3,952 m (12,966 ft))
Country
 Republic of China
(commonly known as Taiwan)
Capital city Taipei
Largest city Taipei (pop. 2,619,920)
Demographics
Demonym Taiwanese
Population 23,046,177 (as of 2009)
Density 668 /km2 (1,730 /sq mi)
Ethnic groups 98% Han[1][2]
 84% Native Taiwanese [3]
  70% Holo
  14% Hakka
 14% Mainlander[4]
2% Taiwanese aborigines[5]
Taiwan
Traditional Chinese 臺灣 or 台灣
Simplified Chinese 台湾
Portuguese: (Ilha) Formosa
Chinese 福爾摩沙
Literal meaning beautiful island
Taiwan,[6] also known as Formosa, is the largest island of the Republic of China (ROC) in East Asia. Taiwan is located east of the Taiwan Strait, off the southeastern coast of mainland China. Since the end of World War II in 1945, the island group has been under the government of the Republic of China.
Separated from the Asian continent by the 180-kilometre-wide Taiwan Strait, the main island of the group is 394 kilometres (245 mi) long and 144 kilometres (89 mi) wide. To the northeast are the main islands of Japan, and the southern end of the Ryukyu Islands of Japan is directly to the east; the Philippines lie to its south. The mountainous island spans across the Tropic of Cancer and is covered by tropical and subtropical vegetation. Other minor islands and islets of the group include the Pescadores, Green Island, and Orchid Island as well as the Diaoyutai Islands which have been controlled by Japan since the 1970s and are known as the Senkaku-shotō.
The island group has been governed by the Republic of China (ROC) since 1945 when the ROC acquired Taiwan from Japan as a result of World War II. Four years later the ROC lost the Chinese Civil War to the Communist Party of China and retreated to Taiwan. Taiwan now composes most of ROC's territory and the ROC itself is commonly known as "Taiwan".[7] The political status of Taiwan is complex because it is claimed by the People's Republic of China (PRC) which was established in 1949 on mainland China and considers itself the successor state to the ROC.[8] Japan had originally acquired Taiwan from the Qing Empire in 1895 per Article 2 of Treaty of Shimonoseki. At the end of World War II, Japan renounced all claims to sovereignty over its former colonial possessions after World War II including Taiwan and Penghu Islands.[9]
Taiwan's rapid economic growth in the decades after World War II has transformed it into an advanced economy as one of the Four Asian Tigers.[10] This economic rise is known as the Taiwan Miracle. It is categorized as an advanced economy by the IMF and high-income economy by the World Bank. Its technology industry plays a key role in the global economy.[11] Taiwanese companies manufacture a large portion of the world's consumer electronics, although most of them are made in their factories in mainland China.[12]

History

Prehistory and early settlements

Evidence of human settlement in Taiwan dates back 30,000 years, although the first inhabitants of Taiwan may have been genetically distinct from any groups currently on the island. About 4,000 years ago, ancestors of current Taiwanese aborigines settled in Taiwan. These aborigines are genetically related to Malay and maternally to Polynesians, and linguists classify their languages as Austronesian.[13] It is thought likely that Polynesian ancestry may be traceable throughout Taiwan.
Records from ancient China indicate that the Han Chinese might have known of the existence of the main island of Taiwan since the Three Kingdoms period (third century, 230 A.D.), having assigned offshore islands in the vicinity names like Greater Liuqiu and Lesser Liuqiu (etymologically, but perhaps not semantically, identical to Ryūkyū in Japanese), though none of these names has been definitively matched to the main island of Taiwan. The Ming Dynasty admiral Cheng Ho (Zheng He) visited Taiwan in 1430.[14]
Han Chinese began settling in the Penghu islands in the 1200s, but Taiwan's hostile tribes and its lack of the trade resources valued in that era rendered it unattractive to all but "occasional adventurers or fishermen engaging in barter" until the 16th century. [15]

European settlement

1600 drawing of Dutch ships in Taiwan.
In 1544, a Portuguese ship sighted the main island of Taiwan and named it Ilha Formosa, which means "Beautiful Island."
In 1624, the Dutch established a commercial base on Taiwan and began to import workers from Fujian and Penghu (Pescadores) as laborers, many of whom settled. The Dutch made Taiwan a colony with its colonial capital at Tayoan City (present day Anping, Tainan). Both Tayoan and the island name Taiwan derive from a word in Sirayan, one of the Formosan languages.
The Dutch military presence was concentrated at a stronghold called Castle Zeelandia.[16] The Dutch colonists also started to hunt the native Formosan Sika deer (Cervus nippon taioanus) that inhabited Taiwan, contributing to the eventual extinction of the subspecies on the island.[17] Furthermore, this contributed to the subsequent identification of native tribes.
In 1626, the Spanish landed on and occupied northern Taiwan (Keelong and Tanshui) as a base to extend its commercial trading. The colonial period lasted 16 years until 1642.

Koxinga and Qing rule

Chinese naval and troop forces of Southern Fujian defeated the Dutch in 1662, subsequently expelling the Dutch government and military from the island. They were led by Koxinga. Following the fall of the Ming Dynasty, Koxinga retreated to Taiwan as a self-styled Ming loyalist and established the Kingdom of Tungning (1662–83). Koxinga established his capital at Tainan and he and his heirs, Zheng Jing, who ruled from 1662–82, and Zheng Keshuang, who served less than a year, continued to launch raids on the south-east coast of mainland China well into the Qing Dynasty, attempting to recapture mainland China.
In 1683, following the defeat of Koxinga's grandson by an armada led by Admiral Shi Lang of Southern Fujian, the Qing formally annexed Taiwan, placing it under the jurisdiction of Fujian province. The Qing government tried to reduce piracy and vagrancy in the area, issuing a series of edicts to manage immigration and respect aboriginal land rights. Immigrants mostly from Southern Fujian continued to enter Taiwan. The border between taxpaying lands and "savage" lands shifted eastward, with some aborigines 'Sinicizing' while others retreated into the mountains. During this time, there were a number of conflicts between Chinese from different regions of Southern Fujian, and between Southern Fujian Chinese and aborigines.
Northern Taiwan and the Penghu Islands were the scene of an important subsidiary campaign in the Sino-French War (August 1884 to April 1885). The French occupied Keelung from 1 October 1884 to 22 June 1885 and the Penghu Islands from 31 March to 22 July 1885. A French attempt to capture Tamsui was defeated at the Battle of Tamsui (8 October 1884). Several battles were fought around Keelung between October 1884 and March 1885 between Liu Ming-ch'uan's Army of Northern Taiwan and Colonel Jacques Duchesne's Formosa Expeditionary Corps. The Keelung Campaign, despite some notable French tactical victories, ended in a stalemate. The Pescadores Campaign was a French victory, but had no long-term consequences. The French evacuated both Keelung and the Penghu archipelago at the end of the war.
In 1885, the Qing upgraded Taiwan's status from prefecture of Fujian to full province, the twentieth in the country, with its capital at Taipei. This was accompanied by a modernization drive that included building Taiwan's first railroad and starting a postal service.[18]

Japanese rule

The building currently known as the ROC Presidential Office was originally built as the Office of the Governor-General by the Japanese government.
Imperial Japan had sought to control Taiwan since 1592, when Toyotomi Hideyoshi began extending Japanese influence overseas. In 1609, the Tokugawa Shogunate sent Arima Harunobu on an exploratory mission. In 1616, Murayama Toan led an unsuccessful invasion of the island.
In 1871, an Okinawan vessel shipwrecked on the southern tip of Taiwan and the crew of fifty-four was beheaded by the Paiwan aborigines. The Ryūkyū Kingdom kept a tributary relationship with Great Qing, at the same time was subordinate to Satsuma Domain of Japan. When Japan sought compensation from Qing China, it was first rejected because Qing considered the incident an internal affair since Taiwan was a prefecture of Fujian Province of Qing and the Ryūkyū Kingdom was a tributary of Qing. When Japanese foreign minister Soejima Taneomi asked the compensation again claiming four of the victims were Japanese citizens from Okayama prefecture of Japan, Qing officials rejected the demand on the grounds that the "wild" and "unsubjugated" aboriginals (traditional Chinese: 台灣生番simplified Chinese: 台湾生番pinyin: Táiwān shēngfān) were outside its jurisdiction. Such aboriginals were treated extremely harshly; American consul J.W. Davidson described how the Chinese in Taiwan ate and traded in their aboriginal victims' flesh.[19] The open renunciation of sovereignty led to a Japanese invasion of Taiwan. In 1874, an expeditionary force of three thousand troops was sent to the island. There were about thirty Taiwanese and 543 Japanese casualties (twelve in battle and 531 by endemic diseases for the Japanese side).[20] [21] [22][23]
Japanese Soldiers Entering Taipei City in 1895 after the Treaty of Shimonoseki.
Great Qing was defeated in the First Sino-Japanese War (1894–95) and Taiwan and Penghu were ceded in full sovereignty to Japan. Inhabitants wishing to remain Qing subjects were given a two-year grace period to sell their property and move to mainland China. Very few Taiwanese saw this as feasible.[24]
On May 25, 1895, a group of pro-Qing high officials proclaimed the Republic of Formosa to resist impending Japanese rule. Japanese forces entered the capital at Tainan and quelled this resistance on October 21, 1895.[citation needed]
The Japanese were instrumental in the industrialization of the island; they extended the railroads and other transportation networks, built an extensive sanitation system and revised the public school system. During this period, both rice and sugarcane production greatly increased. By 1939, Taiwan was the seventh greatest sugar producer in the world.[25] Still, the Taiwanese and Aborigines were classified as second- and third-class citizens. Large-scale violence continued in the first decade of rule. Japan launched over 160 battles to destroy Taiwan's aboriginal tribes during its 51-year rule of the island ...'[26] Around 1935, the Japanese began an island-wide assimilation project to bind the island more firmly to the Japanese Empire and people were taught to see themselves as Japanese. During WWII, tens of thousands of Taiwanese served in the Japanese military.[27] For example, former ROC President Lee Teng-hui's elder brother served in the Japanese navy and died while on duty in February 1945 in the Philippines.
The Imperial Japanese Navy operated heavily out of Taiwan. The "South Strike Group" was based out of the Taihoku Imperial University in Taiwan. Many of the Japanese forces participating in the Aerial Battle of Taiwan-Okinawa were based in Taiwan. Important Japanese military bases and industrial centers throughout Taiwan, like Kaohsiung, were targets of heavy American bombing.[citation needed]
Japan's rule of Taiwan ended after it lost World War II and signed the Instrument of Surrender of Japan on August 15, 1945. But the Japanese rule had long lasting effects on Taiwan and Taiwanese culture. Japanese pop culture is popular in Taiwan, influenced by the 50-year Japanese rule. Significant parts of Taiwanese infrastructure were started under the Japanese rule. The current Presidential Building was also built during that time. In 1938 there were 309,000 Japanese settlers in Taiwan.[28] After World War II, most of the Japanese were repatriated to Japan.

Kuomintang martial law period

The Cairo Conference from November 22 to 26, 1943 in Cairo, Egypt was held to address the Allied position against Japan during WWII, and to make decisions about postwar Asia. One of the three main clauses of the Cairo Declaration was that "all the territories Japan has stolen from China, including Manchuria, Taiwan and the Pescadores, shall be restored to the Republic of China'. This ultimatum was accepted when Japan signed the Instrument of Surrender.
On October 25, 1945, ROC troops representing the Allied Command accepted the formal surrender of Japanese military forces in Taipei (then called Taihoku). The ROC Government, led by Chiang Kai-shek, announced that date as "Taiwan Retrocession Day". The ROC under Chen Yi was strained by social and political instabilities, which were compounded by economic woes, such as hyperinflation. Furthermore, cultural and linguistic differences between the Taiwanese and the mainland Chinese quickly led to the loss of popular support for the new government.[29] This culminated in a series of severe clashes between the ROC government and the Taiwanese, in turn leading to the 228 incident and the reign of White Terror.[30]
In 1949, during the Chinese Civil War, the Kuomintang (KMT), led by Chiang Kai-shek, retreated from mainland China and the ROC government fled from Nanjing (then romanised as "Nanking") to Taipei, Taiwan's largest city, while continuing to claim sovereignty over all China, which the ROC defines to include mainland China, Taiwan, Outer Mongolia and other areas. In mainland China, the victorious Communists established the PRC, claiming to be the sole representative of China (which it claimed included Taiwan) and portraying the ROC government as an illegitimate entity.[31]
Some 2 million people, consisting mainly of soldiers, KMT party members and most importantly the intellectual and business elites also fled mainland China and arrived in Taiwan around that time. In addition, as part of its escape from Communists in mainland China, the ROC government relocated to Taipei with many national treasures including gold reserves and foreign currency reserves.[32] This was often used by the PRC government to explain its economic difficulties and Taiwan's comparative prosperity.[citation needed] From this period through the 1980s, Taiwan was governed by a party-state dictatorship, with the KMT as the ruling party. Military rule continued and little to no distinction was made between the government and the party, with public property, government property, and party property being interchangeable. Government workers and party members were indistinguishable, with government workers, such as teachers, required to become KMT members, and party workers paid salaries and promised retirement benefits along the lines of government employees. In addition all other parties were outlawed, and political opponents were persecuted, incarcerated, and executed.[citation needed]
Taiwan remained a one-party state under martial law under the name of the "Temporary Provisions Effective During the Period of Communist Rebellion", from 1948 to 1987, when the ROC Presidents Chiang Ching-kuo and Lee Teng-hui gradually liberalized and democratized the system. With the advent of democratization, the issue of the political status of Taiwan has resurfaced as a controversial issue (previously, discussion of anything other than unification under the ROC was taboo).
As the Chinese Civil War continued without truce, the ROC built up military fortifications throughout Taiwan. Within this effort, former KMT soldiers built the now famous Central Cross-Island Highway through the Taroko Gorge in the 1950s. The two sides would continue to engage in sporadic military clashes with seldom publicized details well into the 1960’s on the nearby islands with an unknown number of night raids. During the Second Taiwan Strait Crisis in September 1958, Taiwan's landscape saw Nike-Hercules missile batteries added, with the formation of the 1st Missile Battalion Chinese Army that would not be deactivated until 1997. Newer generations of missile batteries have since replaced the Nike Hercules systems throughout the island.
During the 1960s and 1970s, the ROC began to develop into a prosperous, industrialized developed country with a strong and dynamic economy, becoming one of the Four Asian Tigers while maintaining the authoritarian, single-party government. Because of the Cold War, most Western nations and the United Nations regarded the ROC as the sole legitimate government of China until the 1970s, when most nations began switching recognition to the PRC.[33]

Modern democratic era

Chiang Kai-shek's eventual successor, his son Chiang Ching-kuo, began to liberalize Taiwan's political system. In 1984, the younger Chiang selected Lee Teng-hui, an ethnically Taiwanese technocrat, to be his vice president. In 1986, the Democratic Progressive Party (DPP) was formed and inaugurated as the first opposition party in Taiwan to counter the KMT. A year later Chiang Ching-kuo lifted martial law.
After the 1988 death of Chiang Ching-Kuo, President Lee Teng-hui became the first ethnically Taiwanese president of the ROC. Lee continued to democratize the government and decrease the concentration of government authority in the hands of mainland Chinese. Under Lee, Taiwan underwent a process of localization in which Taiwanese culture and history were promoted over a pan-China viewpoint in contrast to earlier KMT policies which had promoted a Chinese identity. Lee's reforms included printing banknotes from the Central Bank rather than the Provincial Bank of Taiwan, and streamlining the Taiwan Provincial Government with most of its functions transferred to the Executive Yuan. Under Lee, the original members of the Legislative Yuan and National Assembly, elected in 1947 to represent mainland Chinese constituencies and having taken the seats without re-election for more than four decades, were forced to resign in 1991. The previously nominal representation in the Legislative Yuan was brought to an end, to reflect the reality that the ROC government had no jurisdiction over mainland China. Restrictions on the use of Taiwanese Hokkien in the broadcast media and in schools were lifted as well. During later years of Lee's administration, he was involved in corruption controversies relating to government release of land and weapons purchase, although no legal proceedings commenced.
In the 1990s, the ROC continued its democratic reforms, as President Lee Teng-hui was elected by the first popular vote held in Taiwan during the 1996 Presidential election. In 2000, Chen Shui-bian of the DPP, was elected as the first non-KMT President and was re-elected to serve his second and last term since 2004. Polarized politics has emerged in Taiwan with the formation of the Pan-Blue Coalition of parties led by the KMT, favoring eventual Chinese reunification, and the Pan-Green Coalition of parties led by the DPP, favoring an eventual and official declaration of Taiwan independence.
On September 30, 2007, the ruling Democratic Progressive Party approved a resolution asserting separate identity from China and called for the enactment of a new constitution for a "normal country". It also called for general use of "Taiwan" as the island's name, without abolishing its formal name, the Republic of China.[34] The Chen administration also pushed for referendums on national defense and UN entry in the 2004 and 2008 elections, which failed due to voter turnout below the required legal threshold of 50% of all registered voters.[35] The Chen administration was dogged by public concerns over reduced economic growth, legislative gridlock due to a pan-blue, opposition controlled Legislative Yuan, and corruption involving the First Family as well as government officials.[36][37]
The KMT increased its majority in the Legislative Yuan in the January 2008 legislative elections, while its nominee Ma Ying-jeou went on to win the presidency in March of the same year, campaigning on a platform of increased economic growth, and better ties with the PRC under a policy of "mutual nondenial".[35] Ma took office on May 20, 2008. Part of the rationale for campaigning for closer economic ties with the PRC stem from the strong economic growth China attained since joining the World Trade Organization. However, some analysts say that despite the election of Ma Ying-jeou, military tensions with the PRC have not been reduced [38]
On 4 March 2010 at about 01:20 UTC, a magnitude 6.4 earthquake hit southern Taiwan.[39]

Geography

Map of Taiwan
Landscape of Taiwan.
The island of Taiwan lies some 180 kilometers off the southeastern coast of China, across the Taiwan Strait, and has an area of 35,801 km2 (13,822.8 sq mi). The East China Sea lies to the north, the Philippine Sea to the east, the Luzon Strait directly to the south and the South China Sea to the southwest. The island is characterized by the contrast between the eastern two-thirds, consisting mostly of rugged mountains running in five ranges from the northern to the southern tip of the island, and the flat to gently rolling plains in the west that are also home to most of Taiwan's population. Taiwan's highest point is Yu Shan at 3,952 meters, and there are five other peaks over 3,500 meters. This makes it the world's fourth-highest island[40]. Taroko National Park, located on the mountainous eastern side of the island, has good examples of mountainous terrain, gorges and erosion caused by a swiftly flowing river.
The shape of the main island of Taiwan is similar to a sweet potato seen in a south-to-north direction, and therefore, Taiwanese, especially the Min-nan division, often call themselves "children of the Sweet Potato."[41] There are also other interpretations of the island shape, one of which is a whale in the ocean (the Pacific Ocean) if viewed in a west-to-east direction, which is a common orientation in ancient maps, plotted either by Western explorers or the Great Qing.

Geology

The island of Taiwan lies in a complex tectonic area between the Yangtze Plate to the west and north, the Okinawa Plate on the north-east, and the Philippine Mobile Belt on the east and south. The upper part of the crust on the island is primarily made up of a series of terranes, mostly old island arcs which have been forced together by the collision of the forerunners of the Eurasian Plate and the Philippine Sea Plate. These have been further uplifted as a result of the detachment of a portion of the Eurasian Plate as it was subducted beneath remnants of the Philippine Sea Plate, a process which left the crust under Taiwan more buoyant.[42]
The east and south of Taiwan are a complex system of belts formed by, and part of the zone of, active collision between the North Luzon Trough portion of the Luzon Arc and South China, where accreted portions of the Luzon Arc and Luzon forearc form the eastern Coastal Range and parallel inland Longitudinal Valley of Taiwan respectively.[43]
The major seismic faults in Taiwan correspond to the various suture zones between the various terranes. These have produced major quakes throughout the history of the island. On September 21, 1999, a 7.3 quake known as the "921 earthquake" occurred. The seismic hazard map for Taiwan by the USGS shows 9/10 of the island as the highest rating (most hazardous).[44]

Climate

Taiwan's climate is marine tropical.[45] The northern part of the island has a rainy season that lasts from January through late March during the northeast monsoon, and experiences meiyu in May.[46] The entire island experiences hot, humid weather from June through September. The middle and southern parts of the island do not have an extended monsoon season during the winter months. Natural hazards such as typhoons and earthquakes[47] are common in the region.
Taiwan is a center of bird endemism; see Endemic birds of Taiwan for further information.

Environment and pollution

With its high population density and many factories, some areas in Taiwan suffer from heavy pollution. Most notable are the southern suburbs of Taipei and the western stretch from Tainan to Lin Yuan, south of Kaohsiung. In the past, Taipei suffered from extensive vehicle and factory air pollution, but with mandatory use of unleaded gasoline and the establishment of the Environmental Protection Agency, the air quality of Taiwan has improved dramatically.[48] Motor scooters, especially older or cheaper two-stroke versions, which are ubiquitous in Taiwan, also contribute disproportionately to urban air pollution.[49][50]

Natural resources

Because of the intensive exploitation throughout Taiwan's pre-modern and modern history, the island's mineral resources (e.g. coal, gold, marble), as well as wild animal reserves (e.g. deer), have been virtually exhausted. Moreover, much of its forestry resources, especially firs were harvested during Japanese rule for the construction of shrines and have only recovered slightly since then. The remaining forests nowadays do not contribute to significant timber production mainly because of concerns about production costs and environmental regulations.
Camphor extraction and sugarcane refining played an important role in Taiwan's exportation from the late nineteenth century through the first half of the twentieth century. The importance of the above industries subsequently declined not because of the exhaustion of related natural resources but mainly of the decline of international market demands.
Nowadays, few natural resources with significant economic value are retained in Taiwan, which are essentially agriculture-associated. Domestic agriculture (rice being the dominant kind of crop) and fisheries retain importance to a certain degree, but they have been greatly challenged by foreign imports since Taiwan's accession to the World Trade Organization in 2001. Consequently, upon the decline of subsistent importance, Taiwan's agriculture now relies heavily on the marketing and exportation of certain kinds of specialty fruits, such as banana, guava, lychee, wax apple, and high-mountain tea.

Energy resources

Taiwan has significant coal deposits and some insignificant petroleum and natural gas deposits. Electrical power generation is nearly 55% coal-based, 18% nuclear power, 17% natural gas, 5% oil, and 5% from renewable energy sources. Nearly all oil and gas for transportation and power needs must be imported, making Taiwan particularly sensitive to fluctuations in energy prices. Because of this, Taiwan's Executive Yuan is pushing for 10% of energy generation to come from renewable energy by 2010, double from the current figure of approximately 5%. In fact, several wind farms built by American and German companies have come online or will in the near future. Taiwan is rich in wind energy resources, with Wind farms both onshore and offshore, though limited land area favors offshore wind resources. Solar energy is also a potential resource to some extent. By promoting renewable energy, Taiwan's government hopes to also aid the nascent renewable energy manufacturing industry, and develop it into an export market.

Demographics

Ethnic groups

Bunun dancer in traditional aboriginal dress.
Taiwan's population was estimated in 2005 at 22.9 million, most of whom are on the island of Taiwan. About 98% of the population is of Han Chinese ethnicity. Of these, 86% are descendants of early Han Chinese immigrants known as the "home-province people" (Chinese: 本省人pinyin: Běnshěng rén; literally "home-province person").
This group contains two subgroups: the Southern Fujianese or "Hokkien" or "Min-nan" (70% of the total population), who migrated from the coastal Southern Fujian (Min-nan) region in the southeast of mainland China beginning in the 17th century; and the Hakka (15% of the total population), who originally migrated south to Guangdong, its surrounding areas and Taiwan. 12% of population are known as waishengren (Chinese: 外省人pinyin: Wàishěng rén; literally "out-of-province person") or "mainlanders" in English and are composed of and descend from mainland Chinese immigrants who arrived after the Second World War.
This group mostly includes those who fled mainland China in 1949 following the Kuomintang defeat in the Chinese Civil War. For political reasons, the mainlanders are also called xin zhùmín (Chinese: 新住民), or "new residents", although the term is considered offensive by many of the mainlanders themselves.[citation needed] As of April 2009, there were 343,000 foreign workers.[51]
The other 2% of Taiwan's population, numbering about 458,000, are listed as the Taiwanese aborigines, divided into 13 major groups: Ami, Atayal, Paiwan, Bunun, Rukai, Puyuma, Tsou, Saisiyat, Tao (Yami), Thao, Kavalan, Truku and Sakizaya.[52]

Languages

About 70% of the people in Taiwan belong to the Hoklo ethnic group and speak both Standard Mandarin (officially recognized by the ROC as the National Language) and Taiwanese Hokkien (commonly known as "Taiwanese"; a variant of Min Nan spoken in Fujian province). Standard Mandarin is the primary language of instruction in schools. The Hakka, about 15% of the population, have a distinct Hakka dialect. Aboriginal minority groups still speak their native languages, although most also speak Mandarin. English is a common second language, with some large private schools providing English instruction. English is compulsory in students' curriculum once they enter elementary school. English as a school subject is also featured on Taiwan's education exams.
Although Mandarin is still the language of instruction in schools and dominates television and radio, non-Mandarin languages or dialects have undergone a revival in public life in Taiwan. A large proportion of the population can speak Taiwanese, and many others have some degree of understanding. Some also speak Hakka. People educated during the Japanese period of 1900 to 1945 used Japanese as the medium of instruction. Some in the older generations only speak the Japanese they learned at school and the Taiwanese they spoke at home and are unable to communicate with many in the younger generations who only speak Mandarin.[citation needed]
Most aboriginal groups in Taiwan have their own languages which, unlike Taiwanese or Hakka, do not belong to the Chinese language family, but rather to the Austronesian language family.

Religion

Tainan Confucius Temple. Four characters on the inscribed board mean "First School in All of Taiwan"
Over 93% of Taiwanese are adherents of a combination of Buddhism, Confucianism, and Taoism; 4.5% are adherents of Christianity, which includes Protestants, Catholics, Latter-day Saints and other, non-denominational, Christian groups; , and 2.5% are adherents of other religions, such as Islam. Taiwanese aborigines comprise a notable subgroup among professing Christians: "...over 64 percent identify as Christian... Church buildings are the most obvious markers of Aboriginal villages, distinguishing them from Taiwanese or Hakka villages."[53]
Confucianism is a philosophy that deals with secular moral ethics, and serves as the foundation of both Chinese and Taiwanese culture. The majority of Taiwanese people usually combine the secular moral teachings of Confucianism with whatever religions they are affiliated with.
One especially important goddess for Taiwanese people is Matsu, who symbolizes the seafaring spirit of Taiwan's ancestors from Fujian and Guangdong.
As of 2009, there are 14,993 temples in Taiwan, approximately one place of worship per 1,500 residents. 9,202 of those temples were dedicated to Taoism. In 2008, Taiwan had 3,262 Churches, an increase of 145.[54]

Culture

National Palace Museum, ranked as one of the world's top five museums,[citation needed] in Taipei
Apo Hsu and the NTNU Symphony Orchestra on stage in the National Concert Hall
Taipei 101 set a new height record in 2004
The cultures of Taiwan are a hybrid blend of various sources, incorporating elements of traditional Chinese culture, attributable to the historical and ancestry origin of the majority of its current residents, Japanese culture, traditional Confucianist beliefs, and increasingly globalized values.
After their move to Taiwan, the Kuomintang imposed an official interpretation of traditional Chinese culture over Taiwanese cultures. The government launched a program promoting Chinese calligraphy, traditional Chinese painting, folk art, and Chinese opera.
Since the Taiwan localization movement of the 1990s, Taiwan's cultural identity has enjoyed greater expression. Identity politics, along with the over one hundred years of political separation from mainland China has led to distinct traditions in many areas, including cuisine and music.
The status of Taiwanese culture is debated. It is disputed whether Taiwanese culture is a regional form of Chinese culture or a distinct culture. Speaking Taiwanese as a symbol of the localization movement has become an emblem of Taiwanese identity.
One of Taiwan's greatest attractions is the National Palace Museum, which houses more than 650,000 pieces of Chinese bronze, jade, calligraphy, painting and porcelain, and is considered one of the greatest collection of Chinese art and objects in the world.[55] The KMT moved this collection from the Forbidden City in Beijing in 1949 when it fled to Taiwan. The collection, estimated to be one-tenth of China's cultural treasures, is so extensive that only 1% is on display at any time. The PRC had said that the collection was stolen and that it legitimately belongs in China, but Taiwan has long defended its collection as a necessary act to protect the pieces from destruction especially during the Cultural Revolution.[56] Relations regarding this treasure have warmed recently as the PRC has agreed to lending relics and that that Beijing Palace Museum Curator Zheng Xinmiao said that artifacts in both Chinese and Taiwanese museums are "China's cultural heritage jointly owned by people across the Taiwan Strait."[57]
Popular sports in Taiwan include basketball and baseball.
International Community Radio Taipei is the most listened to International Radio Media in Taiwan.[citation needed]
Karaoke, drawn from contemporary Japanese culture, is extremely popular in Taiwan, where it is known as KTV.
Taiwan has a high density of 24-hour convenience stores, which in addition to the usual services, provide services on behalf of financial institutions or government agencies such as collection of parking fees, utility bills, traffic violation fines, and credit card payments.[58] They even provide the service of mailing packages.
Taiwanese culture has also influenced other cultures. Bubble tea and milk tea are available in Australia, Europe and North America. Taiwan television variety shows are very popular in Singapore, Malaysia and other Asian countries. Taiwanese films have won various international awards at film festivals around the world. Ang Lee, a Taiwanese director, has directed critically acclaimed films such as: Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon; Eat Drink Man Woman; Sense and Sensibility; Brokeback Mountain; and Lust, Caution. Other famous Taiwanese directors include Tsai Ming-Liang, Edward Yang and Hou Hsiao-hsien.

Sports

Baseball is considered Taiwan's national sport and it is a popular spectator sport. One of the most famous Taiwanese baseball pitchers is Chien-Ming Wang, who is a starting pitcher in Major League Baseball. Other notable players in the league include Chin-hui Tsao who played for the Colorado Rockies (2003–2005) and the Los Angeles Dodgers (2007), Kuo Hong-chih and Hu Chin-lung who are both part of the Los Angeles Dodgers. The Chinese Professional Baseball League in Taiwan was established in 1989,[59] and eventually absorbed the competing Taiwan Major League in 2003. As of 2008, the CPBL has four teams with average attendance of approximately 3,000 per game.
Besides baseball, martial arts such as taekwondo, karate, and kung fu are also widely practiced and competed.
In 2009, Taiwan hosted two international sporting events on the island. The World Games 2009 were held in Kaohsiung City between July 16, 2009 and July 26, 2009. Taipei City hosted the 21st Summer Deaflympics in September of the same year.

Political status

Economy

Taipei 101 is a symbol of the success of the Taiwanese economy.
Taiwan's quick industrialization and rapid growth during the latter half of the twentieth century, has been called the "Taiwan Miracle" (台灣奇蹟) or "Taiwan Economic Miracle". As it has developed alongside Singapore, South Korea, and Hong Kong, Taiwan is one of the industrialized developed countries known as the "Four Asian Tigers".
Japanese rule prior to and during World War II brought forth changes in the public and private sectors of the economy, most notably in the area of public works, which enabled rapid communications and facilitated transport throughout much of the island. The Japanese also improved public education and made the system compulsory for all Taiwanese citizens during this time.
When the KMT government fled to Taiwan it brought the entire gold reserve and the foreign currency reserve of mainland China to the island which stabilized prices and reduced hyperinflation. More importantly, as part of its retreat to Taiwan, KMT brought with them the intellectual and business elites from mainland China.[60] The KMT government instituted many laws and land reforms that it had never effectively enacted on mainland China. The government also implemented a policy of import-substitution, attempting to produce imported goods domestically. Much of this was made possible through US economic aid, subsidizing the higher cost of domestic production.
In 1962, Taiwan had a per capita gross national product (GNP) of $170, placing the island's economy squarely between Zaire and Congo. By 2008 Taiwan's per capita GNP, adjusted for purchasing power parity (PPP), had soared to $33,000 (2008 est.) contributing to a Human Development Index equivalent to that of other developed countries.[citation needed]
Today Taiwan has a dynamic capitalist, export-driven economy with gradually decreasing state involvement in investment and foreign trade. In keeping with this trend, some large government-owned banks and industrial firms are being privatized. Real growth in GDP has averaged about eight percent during the past three decades. Exports have provided the primary impetus for industrialization. The trade surplus is substantial, and foreign reserves are the world's fifth largest as of 31 December 2007.[61]
Agriculture constitutes only two percent of the GDP, down from 35 percent in 1952. Traditional labor-intensive industries are steadily being moved offshore and with more capital and technology-intensive industries replacing them.[citation needed] Taiwan has become a major foreign investor in mainland China, Thailand, Indonesia, the Philippines, Malaysia, and Vietnam. It is estimated that some 50,000 Taiwanese businesses and 1,000,000 businesspeople and their dependents are established in the PRC.[62]
Because of its conservative financial approach and its entrepreneurial strengths, Taiwan suffered little compared with many of its neighbors from the 1997 Asian Financial Crisis.[citation needed] Unlike its neighbors South Korea and Japan, the Taiwanese economy is dominated by small and medium sized businesses, rather than the large business groups. The global economic downturn, however, combined with poor policy coordination by the new administration and increasing bad debts in the banking system, pushed Taiwan into recession in 2001, the first whole year of negative growth since 1947. Due to the relocation of many manufacturing and labor intensive industries to mainland China, unemployment also reached a level not seen since the 1973 oil crisis. This became a major issue in the 2004 presidential election. Growth averaged more than 4% in the 2002–2006 period and the unemployment rate fell below 4%. Since the global financial crisis starting with United States in 2007, the unemployment rate has risen to over 5.9% and Economic Growth fallen to -2.9%.[citation needed]
Leading technologies of Taiwan include:

See also

References

  1. ^ http://www.gio.gov.tw/taiwan-website/5-gp/yearbook/ch02.html
  2. ^ Taiwan entry at The World Factbook
  3. ^ Taiwan entry at The World Factbook "Native Taiwanese" here refers to the people whose ancestors moved to Taiwan from China prior to the end of World War II. Most of the ancestors moved to Taiwan hundreds of years earlier.
  4. ^ Waishengren usually refers to people who moved from mainland China to Taiwan post 1949 when the KMT retreated to Taiwan due to the Chinese Civil War and their descendants born in Taiwan. It usually does not include citizens of the People's Republic of China who recently moved to Taiwan.
  5. ^ In the RoC, the Taiwanese Aborigines are officially categorised into 14 separate ethnic groups. They have all been grouped into one group here for simplicity reasons. For the entire list of groups, see List of ethnic groups in Taiwan
  6. ^ Historically, Taiwan has also been called in Chinese: 大灣 / 台員 / 大員 / 台圓 / 大圓 / 台窩灣
  7. ^ "Country Profile:Taiwan". BBC. http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/asia-pacific/country_profiles/1285915.stm. Retrieved 2009-09-02. 
  8. ^ "The One-China Principle and the Taiwan Issue". Taiwan Affairs Office and the Information Office of the State Council of the People's Republic of China. 2000-02-21. http://www.gwytb.gov.cn:8088/detail.asp?table=WhitePaper&title=White%20Papers%20On%20Taiwan%20Issue&m_id=4. Retrieved 2008-08-02. 
  9. ^ "FOCUS: Taiwan-Japan ties back on shaky ground as Taipei snubs Tokyo envoy". Kyodo News. http://home.kyodo.co.jp/modules/fstStory/index.php?storyid=453676. Retrieved 2010-01-14. 
  10. ^ World Economic Outlook published by the IMF
  11. ^ "Why Taiwan Matters". BusinessWeek. May 16, 2005. http://www.businessweek.com/magazine/content/05_20/b3933011.htm. 
  12. ^ "Slideshow: Taiwan's Tech Clout". BusinessWeek. May 16, 2005. http://images.businessweek.com/ss/05/05/taiwanindustry/index_01.htm. 
  13. ^ Trejaut, Jean; Toomas Kivisild, Jun Hun Loo, Chien Liang Lee, Chun Lin He, Chia Jung Hsu, Zheng Yuan Li, Marie Lin (August 2005). "Traces of Archaic Mitochondrial Lineages Persist in Austronesian-Speaking Formosan Populations". PLoS Biology 3 (8): e247. doi:10.1371/journal.pbio.0030247. 
  14. ^ Roy, Denny (2002). Taiwan. Cornell University Press. pp. 11. ISBN 978-0-8014-8805-4. http://books.google.com/books?id=DNqasVI-gWMC. 
  15. ^ Shepherd, John R. (1993), Statecraft and Political Economy on the Taiwan Frontier, 1600–1800, Stanford, California: Stanford University Press, p. 7  Reprinted Taipei: SMC Publishing, 1995.
  16. ^ "Finding the Heritage — Reasons for the project". National Anping Harbor Histosrical Park. http://anping.tncg.gov.tw/archaeology/e_aha_01.jsp. Retrieved 2006-03-08. 
  17. ^ Hsu; Govindasamy Agoramoorthy (August 1997). "Wildlife conservation in Taiwan". Conservation Biology 11 (4): 834–836. doi:10.1046/j.1523-1739.1997.011004834.x. http://links.jstor.org/sici?sici=0888-8892%28199708%2911%3A4%3C834%3AWCIT%3E2.0.CO%3B2-Z. 
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  21. ^ Paine, S.C.M (2002). The Sino-Japanese War of 1894–1895: Perceptions, Power, and Primacy. London: Cambridge University Press. ISBN 0-521-81714-5. 
  22. ^ Ravina, Mark (2003). The Last Samurai: The Life and Battles of Saigo Takamori. Wiley. ISBN 0471089702. 
  23. ^ Smits, Gregory (1999). "Visions of Ryūkyū: Identity and Ideology in Early-Modern Thought and Politics." Honolulu: University of Hawai'i Press.
  24. ^ Ryotaro, Shiba. Taiwan Kikou
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  28. ^ Formosa (Taiwan) Under Japanese Rule
  29. ^ "This Is the Shame". Time Magazine. 1946-06-10. http://www.time.com/time/archive/preview/0,10987,792979,00.html. (subscription required)
  30. ^ "Snow Red & Moon Angel". Time Magazine. 1947-04-07. http://www.time.com/time/archive/preview/0,10987,804090,00.html. (subscription required), full version at Lomaji.
  31. ^ "The One-China Principle and the Taiwan Issue". PRC Taiwan Affairs Office and the Information Office of the State Council. 2005. http://www.gwytb.gov.cn:8088/detail.asp?table=WhitePaper&title=White%20Papers%20On%20Taiwan%20Issue&m_id=4. "Section 1: Since the KMT ruling clique retreated to Taiwan, although its regime has continued to use the designations ‘Republic of China’ and ‘government of the Republic of China,’ it has long since completely forfeited its right to exercise state sovereignty on behalf of China and, in reality, has always remained only a local authority in Chinese territory." 
  32. ^ Dunbabin, J. P. D. (2008). The Cold War. Pearson Education. p. 187. ISBN 0582423988. http://books.google.com/books?id=IVriqPvx7iwC&pg=PA187. "In 1949 Chiang Kai-shek had transferred to Taiwan the government, gold reserve, and some of the army of his Republic of China." 
  33. ^ United Nations General Assembly Resolution 2758
  34. ^ "AP, Taiwan Party Asserts Separate Identity". http://ap.google.com/article/ALeqM5jF4syWWBWq5u3MZEs-3s9IUT8pGgD8RVKVM80. 
  35. ^ a b Lam, Willy (2008-03-28). "Ma Ying-jeou and the Future of Cross-Strait Relations" ( – Scholar search). China Brief (Jamestown Foundation) 8 (7). http://jamestown.org/china_brief/article.php?articleid=2374064. Retrieved 2008-04-04. 
  36. ^ "The Nationalists are back in Taiwan", The Economist, 03-23, http://www.economist.com/world/asia/displaystory.cfm?story_id=10903499 
  37. ^ "Straitened times: Taiwan looks to China", The Financial Times, 03-25, http://www.ft.com/cms/s/0/07d43e18-fa9a-11dc-aa46-000077b07658.html 
  38. ^ http://www.voanews.com/english/2009-08-20-voa17.cfm
  39. ^ CNN's Christine Theodorou and Journalist Andrew Lee (March 3, 2010 9:23 p.m. EST (March 4, 2010 02:23 UTC)). "6.4-magnitude quake hits southern Taiwan". CNN. http://www.cnn.com/2010/WORLD/americas/03/03/taiwan.quake/index.html?hpt=T1. Retrieved 2010-03-04 (UTC). 
  40. ^ Tallest Islands of the World - World Island Info web site
  41. ^ Chao, Kang & Johnson, Marshall (2000). Nationalist Social Sciences and the Fabrication of Subimperial Subjects in Taiwan. Positions 8:1. Page 167.
  42. ^ Geology of Taiwan - University of Arizona
  43. ^ Clift, Schouten and Draut (2003) in Intra-Oceanic Subduction Systems: Tectonic and Magmatic Processes, ISBN 1-86239-147-5 p84–86
  44. ^ USGS:Seismic hazard map of Taiwan
  45. ^ "Field Listing — Climate". The World Factbook. Central Intelligence Agency. https://www.cia.gov/library/publications/the-world-factbook/fields/2059.html. Retrieved 2006-03-08. 
  46. ^ "Monthly Mean Days of Precipitation". Climate Data. ROC Central Weather Bureau. http://www.cwb.gov.tw/V4e/climate/Data/table2_e.html. Retrieved 2006-03-08. 
  47. ^ "Rescuers hunt quake survivors". BBC. 1999-09-21. http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/asia-pacific/453087.stm. 
  48. ^ "Taiwan: Environmental Issues". Country Analysis Brief — Taiwan. United States Department of Energy. http://www.eia.doe.gov/emeu/cabs/taiwanenv.html. Retrieved 2006-03-08. "The government credits the APC system with helping to reduce the number of days when the country's pollution standard index score exceeded 100 from 7% of days in 1994 to 3% of days in 2001." 
  49. ^ Taiwan Country Analysis Brief, US Energy Information Administration, 2005: "Taipei has the most obvious air pollution, primary caused by the motorbikes and scooters used by millions of the city's residents."
  50. ^ "A Viable Niche Market--Fuel Cell Scooters in Taiwan", Taiwan Institute of Economic Research, 2002: "In Taiwan’s cities, the main source of air pollution is the waste gas exhausted by scooters, especially by the great number of two-stroke engine scooters."
  51. ^ China: Recession; Taiwan, Hong Kong. Migration News. July 2009.
  52. ^ "The World Factbook". CIA. 2006-05-03. https://www.cia.gov/library/publications/the-world-factbook/geos/tw.html. 
  53. ^ Stainton, Michael (2002). Presbyterians and the Aboriginal Revitalization Movement in Taiwan. Cultural Survival Quarterly 26.2. Accessed 21 March 2007.
  54. ^ 15,000 temples. Accessed 27 July 2009.
  55. ^ http://encarta.msn.com/encyclopedia_761557357_9/museum.html
  56. ^ http://www.aol.co.nz/celebrity/story/Beijing-to-lend-29-Qing-Dynasty-relics-to-Taiwan/1684051/index.html
  57. ^ http://www.aol.co.nz/celebrity/story/China-not-demanding-immediate-return-of-Taiwan-art/1745071/index.html
  58. ^ American Chamber of Commerce in Taipei. "Convenience Stores Aim at Differentiation" ( – Scholar search). Taiwan Business TOPICS 34 (11). http://www.amcham.com.tw/publication_topics_view.php?volume=34&vol_num=11&topics_id=558. 
  59. ^ Intro of CPBL
  60. ^ Roy, Denny (2003). Taiwan: A Political History. Ithaca, New York: Cornell University Press. pp. 76, 77. ISBN 0-8014-8805-2. 
  61. ^ "CIA – World Fact Book – Rank Order — Reserves of foreign exchange and gold". World Fact Book. CIA. 2008-09-04. Archived from the original on 2008-09-26. http://www.webcitation.org/5b7FcMQjc. Retrieved 2008-09-26. "Rank 5 Taiwan $ 274,700,000,000 31 December 2007" 
  62. ^ Morris, Peter (February 4, 2004). "Taiwan business in China supports opposition". Asia Times Online. http://www.atimes.com/atimes/China/FB04Ad04.html. 

Further reading

  • Bush, R. & O'Hanlon, M. (2007). A War Like No Other: The Truth About China's Challenge to America. Wiley. ISBN 0471986771
  • Bush, R. (2006). Untying the Knot: Making Peace in the Taiwan Strait. Brookings Institution Press. ISBN 0815712901
  • Carpenter, T. (2006). America's Coming War with China: A Collision Course over Taiwan. Palgrave Macmillan. ISBN 1403968411
  • Cole, B. (2006). Taiwan's Security: History and Prospects. Routledge. ISBN 0415365813
  • Copper, J. (2006). Playing with Fire: The Looming War with China over Taiwan. Praeger Security International General Interest. ISBN 0275988880
  • Copper, J. (2000). Historical Dictionary of Taiwan (Republic of China). The Scarecrow Press. ISBN 0810836653
  • Federation of American Scientists et al. (2006). Chinese Nuclear Forces and U.S. Nuclear War Planning
  • Gill, B. (2007). Rising Star: China's New Security Diplomacy. Brookings Institution Press. ISBN 0815731469
  • Knapp, R. (1980). China's Island Frontier: Studies in the Historical Geography of Taiwan. University of Hawai`i Press. ISBN 0824807057
  • Rubinstein, M. (2006). Taiwan: A New History. M.E. Sharpe. ISBN 0765614952
  • Shirk, S. (2007). China: Fragile Superpower: How China's Internal Politics Could Derail Its Peaceful Rise. Oxford University Press. ISBN 0195306090
  • Tsang, S. (2006). If China Attacks Taiwan: Military Strategy, Politics and Economics. Routledge. ISBN 0415407850
  • Tucker, N.B. (2005). Dangerous Strait: the U.S.-Taiwan-China Crisis. Columbia University Press. ISBN 0231135645

External links


Travel guide

Up to date as of January 14, 2010

From Wikitravel

Asia : East Asia : Taiwan
noframe
Location
Image:LocationROC.png
Flag
Image:Tw-flag.PNG
Quick Facts
Capital Taipei
Government Multiparty democratic republic with a popularly elected president and unicameral legislature
Currency New Taiwan dollar (TWD)
Area total: 35,980 km2
water: 3,720 km2
land: 32,260 km2
Population 22,858,872 (July 2007 est.)
Language Mandarin Chinese (official), Taiwanese, Hakka
Religion Mixture of Buddhist, Confucian, and Taoist 93%, Christian 4.5%, other 2.5%
Electricity 110V/60HZ (USA plug type)
Calling Code +886
Internet TLD .tw
Time Zone UTC+8
.Taiwan (Traditional Chinese: 台灣 or 臺灣, Simplified Chinese: 台湾 tái wān) [1] is an island nation of about 36,000 km² located off the coast of southeastern China, southwest of Okinawa and north of the Philippines.^ Eastern Asia, islands bordering the East China Sea, Philippine Sea, South China Sea, and Taiwan Strait, north of the Philippines, off the southeastern coast of China .
  • Taiwan (Republic of China) 28 January 2010 1:44 UTC www.my-world-guide.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ One of Taiwan's greatest attractions is the National Palace Museum, which houses more than 650,000 pieces of Chinese bronze, jade, calligraphy, painting and porcelain.
  • Taiwan (Republic of China) 28 January 2010 1:44 UTC www.my-world-guide.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Anyway, how could China claim that Taiwan ’stole’ their property (such as the artifacts of the National Palace Museum after the Chinese civil war) if Taiwan is part of China itself?
  • Taiwan is a Country 19 September 2009 13:27 UTC geography.about.com [Source type: Original source]

.The island is governed by the Republic of China (中華民國 Zhōnghuá Mínguó) or ROC.^ When the KMT government fled to Taiwan it brought the entire gold reserve and the foreign currency reserve of mainland China to the island which stabilized prices and reduced hyperinflation.

^ During the early years of the Republic, almost all foreign powers recognized the "warlord" government controlled by Yuan Shi-kai in Beijing as the legitimate government of China.

^ Since the lifting of martial law, the Republic of China has democratized and reformed, removing legacy components that were originally meant for the governing of mainland China.

.Shaped roughly like a sweet potato, the nation is home to more than 23 million people and is one of the most densely populated places in the world.^ With a population of over 1.3 billion, it is the most populous country in the world.
  • People's Republic of China - a knol by Per- Jonas Xia Mehus 28 January 2010 1:44 UTC knol.google.com [Source type: News]

^ PEOPLE Taiwan has a population of 23 million.
  • Taiwan (10/09) 28 January 2010 1:57 UTC www.state.gov [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ The Chinese people traditionally value education as one of life's most worthwhile pursuits.
  • Universities, Colleges in the Republic of China 11 September 2009 12:18 UTC www.tw.org [Source type: Academic]

Besides its crowded cities, Taiwan is also known for steep mountains and lush forests. .In addition to the island of Taiwan, the Republic of China also governs the Pescadores (Penghu), Quemoy (Kinmen/Jinmen), and Matsu.^ The post-1949 Republic of China on Taiwan .
  • Taiwan Legal Research at the University of Washington 11 September 2009 12:18 UTC lib.law.washington.edu [Source type: Academic]

^ The CPC's rival during the Chinese Civil War, the Kuomintang (KMT), fled to Taiwan and surrounding islands after its civil war defeat in 1949, claiming legitimacy over China, Mongolia, and Tuva while it was the ruling power of the Republic of China (ROC).
  • People's Republic of China - a knol by Per- Jonas Xia Mehus 28 January 2010 1:44 UTC knol.google.com [Source type: News]

^ Taiwan Province: the main island, except for the two municipalities, plus Penghu county ( Pescadores Islands) Sixteen counties Five provincially administrated cities Fukien Province: several islands off the Chinese mainland Kinmen County: Kinmen, Lesser Kinmen and Wuchiu part of Lienchiang County, namely Matsu, Dongyin, Siyin and Jyuguang Two Central Municipalities Taipei City Kaohsiung City The Republic of China also controls the Dongsha Islands (Dong-Sha) and Taiping Island, which are part of the disputed South China Sea Islands.

.While the political status of Taiwan is a somewhat controversial and sensitive issue, from a traveller's point of view, Taiwan is under the de facto control of a different government from mainland China, and in practice operates as a separate country.^ Because China is different from your country!
  • Taiwan is a Country 19 September 2009 13:27 UTC geography.about.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Thus, de facto, Taiwan is a nation.
  • Taiwan is a Country 19 September 2009 13:27 UTC geography.about.com [Source type: Original source]

^ What is Taiwan's relationship to mainland China?
  • Is Taiwan a Country? 19 September 2009 13:27 UTC geography.about.com [Source type: Original source]
  • Taiwan is a Country 19 September 2009 13:27 UTC geography.about.com [Source type: Original source]

This is not a political endorsement of the claims of either side of the dispute.
Map of Taiwan with regions colour-coded
Map of Taiwan with regions colour-coded
Northern Taiwan (Taipei, Hsinchu County, Taipei County, Taoyuan County, Hsinchu, Yangmingshan National Park)
the capital city, main airport and technology hub of the island
Central Taiwan (Changhua County, Miaoli County, Nantou County, Taichung County, Sun Moon Lake and Taichung)
scenic mountains and lakes and major national parks
Eastern Taiwan (Hualien County, Taitung County, Yilan County, Taroko Gorge, Hualien and Taitung)
cut off from the rest of the island by the central mountains, this is a region of great natural beauty
Southern Taiwan (Chiayi County, Kaohsiung County, Pingtung County, Tainan County, Yunlin County, Kaohsiung, Tainan)
the tropics of Taiwan with beaches and palm trees and the second largest city
.The Outlying Islands (Green Island (Lu Tao), Kinmen (Quemoy), Matsu, Orchid Island (Lan Yu) and Penghu.^ ADMINISTRATION The authorities in Taipei exercise control over Taiwan, Kinmen, Matsu, Penghu (Pescadores) and several other smaller islands.
  • Taiwan (10/09) 28 January 2010 1:57 UTC www.state.gov [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Major fighting in the civil war ended in 1950 with the Communist Party of China (CPC) in control of most of Mainland China, and the ROC in control of Taiwan and several offshore islands ( Kinmen, Penghu, and Matsu).

^ In January 2001, Taiwan formally allowed the "three mini-links" (direct trade, travel, and postal links) from Kinmen (Quemoy) and Matsu Islands to Fujian Province and permitted direct cross-Strait trade in February 2002.
  • Taiwan (10/09) 28 January 2010 1:57 UTC www.state.gov [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

)
small offshore islands, some of them very far offshore

Cities

.Taiwan has many large cities and towns.^ Roads in Taiwan's major cities are generally congested, and the many scooters and motorcycles that weave in and out of traffic make driving conditions worse.

^ Department Stores: There are over 50 department stores on Taiwan, concentrated in the large cities.
  • 1996 Country Commercial Guides 19 September 2009 13:27 UTC dosfan.lib.uic.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Moreover, many Taiwan investors, especially large-sized companies, employ financial instruments to raise funds in capital markets both at home and abroad.
  • 1996 Country Commercial Guides 19 September 2009 13:27 UTC dosfan.lib.uic.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.Below is a list of nine of the most notable.^ A few of the available databases you will likely use most often are listed below.
  • Taiwan Legal Research at the University of Washington 11 September 2009 12:18 UTC lib.law.washington.edu [Source type: Academic]

.Other cities are listed under their specific regional section.^ Municipalities directly under the Central Government and other large cities are divided into districts and counties.
  • CONSTITUTION OF THE PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF CHINA 28 January 2010 1:44 UTC english.people.com.cn [Source type: Original source]
  • Constitution of the People's Republic of China - The U.S. Constitution Online - USConstitution.net 28 January 2010 1:44 UTC www.usconstitution.net [Source type: Original source]
  • Selected Legal Provisions of the People's Republic of China Affecting Criminal Justice 28 January 2010 1:44 UTC www.cecc.gov [Source type: Original source]

Taipei - the capital of Taiwan
.
Taipei - the capital of Taiwan
  • Taipei (臺北 or 台北) is the seat of government of the Republic of China and its center of commerce and culture.^ The post-1949 Republic of China on Taiwan .
    • Taiwan Legal Research at the University of Washington 11 September 2009 12:18 UTC lib.law.washington.edu [Source type: Academic]

    ^ Today the Republic of China is often known as " Chinese Taipei" or " Taiwan ".

    ^ The Republic of China ( Taiwan ) has become a major foreign investor in the People's Republic of China , Thailand , Indonesia , the Philippines , Malaysia , and Vietnam .

    .Taipei is home to the world's second tallest skyscraper, Taipei 101.
  • Hsinchu (新竹) is a center of hi-tech industry, and one of the world's leading manufacturers of hi-tech components.^ Stability was interrupted by the Japanese invasion of Manchuria in 1931, with hostilities continuing through the Second Sino-Japanese War, a component of World War II , from 1937 to 1945.

    ^ The shipbuilding industry is second only to Japan's and has a 32 percent share of the world market.
    • Culture of South Korea - History and ethnic relations , Urbanism, architecture, and the use of space 20 November 2009 10:28 UTC www.everyculture.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ Taipei 101, the current world's tallest building (509m) since its completion in 2004.

    .Hsinchu Science Park [2] is the home to many hi-tech companies.
  • Hualien (花蓮) is located near Taroko Gorge, and is considered one of the most pleasant of Taiwan's cities.
  • Jiufen (九份) - this former gold mining town located on the northeast coast is now a popular tourist destination.
  • Kaohsiung (高雄) is the second-largest city on the island.^ Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Company (TSMC) has scheduled a ramp up of monthly capacity at its 300mm (12-inch) wafer fab (Fab 14) located in southern Taiwan at the Tainan Science Park to 6,000 wafers by the end of 2009, and to about 35,000 wafers in 2010, according to sources at chip equipment suppliers.
    • Login to DIGITIMES archive & research 20 November 2009 10:28 UTC www.digitimes.com [Source type: General]

    ^ The democratization process continued with the first direct elections of the Mayors of Taiwan's two largest cities (Taipei and Kaohsiung) and the Governor of Taiwan Province in December 1994.
    • 1996 Country Commercial Guides 19 September 2009 13:27 UTC dosfan.lib.uic.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ The United Kingdom considers the Taiwan issue is one to be settled by the people on both sides of the Taiwan Strait.
    • Is Taiwan a Country? 19 September 2009 13:27 UTC geography.about.com [Source type: Original source]

    .It has one of the busiest sea ports (the Port of Kaohsiung) in the world and it has the island's second-largest airport, Kaohsiung International Airport (KHH) [3].
  • Keelung (基隆) is the a center of transshipment in the north, and is located about a thirty minute drive from downtown Taipei.
  • Puli (埔里) is located at the geographical center of the island, and it serves as a good base for exploring the central mountains and Sun Moon Lake.
  • Taichung (臺中 or 台中) is the third largest city in Taiwan, and has an abundance of interesting cultural amenities and activities.
  • Tainan (臺南 or 台南) is the oldest city in Taiwan and was the capital during imperial times.^ Two international airports are located at the north and south ends of the island.
    • 1996 Country Commercial Guides 19 September 2009 13:27 UTC dosfan.lib.uic.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ The Location of Grand Formosa Regent Hotel in Taipei is in the center of the city which is the commercial, financial and the social hub of city.
    • Grand Formosa Regent Taipei, Taiwan 22 September 2009 21:10 UTC www.asiarooms.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ Taiwan Province: the main island, except for the two municipalities, plus Penghu county ( Pescadores Islands) Sixteen counties Five provincially administrated cities Fukien Province: several islands off the Chinese mainland Kinmen County: Kinmen, Lesser Kinmen and Wuchiu part of Lienchiang County, namely Matsu, Dongyin, Siyin and Jyuguang Two Central Municipalities Taipei City Kaohsiung City The Republic of China also controls the Dongsha Islands (Dong-Sha) and Taiping Island, which are part of the disputed South China Sea Islands.

    It is famous for its historic buildings and snack food.
Mountain trail in Alishan
Mountain trail in Alishan
Entrance into Taroko National Park in Hualien County
Entrance into Taroko National Park in Hualien County
.People tend to think of Taiwan as a small, crowded island filled mostly with electronic factories, and if you stay in Taipei or along the west coast you might indeed maintain that illusion.^ ADMINISTRATION The authorities in Taipei exercise control over Taiwan, Kinmen, Matsu, Penghu (Pescadores) and several other smaller islands.
  • Taiwan (10/09) 28 January 2010 1:57 UTC www.state.gov [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ China might Taiwan’s military and political leadership, and use a variety of lethal, punitive, or disruptive military possibly break the Taiwan people’s will to fight.
  • Military Power Report of People's Republic of China 2008 28 January 2010 1:44 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ I have lots of taiwanese friends, we talk for fun right, I asked them one day, do you think Taiwan belongs to China?
  • Is Taiwan a Country? 19 September 2009 13:27 UTC geography.about.com [Source type: Original source]

.However, the island is also home to high mountain ranges, great beaches and stunning national parks - many with hot springs.^ These teas can either be purchased in attractive packages for use at home or sampled in one of the island's many traditional Chinese-style tea houses.
  • 1996 Country Commercial Guides 19 September 2009 13:27 UTC dosfan.lib.uic.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ U.S. goods enjoy a reputation for quality on the island; the reputation for high quality however, is coupled with a reputation for high-cost and, sometimes, poor service from U.S. vendors.
  • 1996 Country Commercial Guides 19 September 2009 13:27 UTC dosfan.lib.uic.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.
  • Alishan (阿里山) - misty forests of giant cypresses and amazing sunrises at the center of the island, reached by a scenic narrow-gauge train
  • Kenting National Park (墾丁國家公園) - located at the extreme southern tip of the island, this park is famous for its beaches and lush vegetation.
  • Shei-pa National Park (雪霸國家公園) - a park spanning mountains and rivers located in Hsinchu County - great hiking trails
  • Sun Moon Lake (日月潭) - nestled at 762 m (2,500 ft) in lofty mountains in Nantou County, this lake is famous for its clear sparkling blue water and picturesque mountain backdrop.
  • Taipingshan (太平山) - a historic logging area and one of Taiwan's most scenic spots.^ E. Health information As in many other tropical and sub-tropical areas, tap water in Taiwan should be boiled before drinking.
    • 1996 Country Commercial Guides 19 September 2009 13:27 UTC dosfan.lib.uic.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ Tax credits are offered to encourage locating in less-developed areas of Taiwan.
    • 1996 Country Commercial Guides 19 September 2009 13:27 UTC dosfan.lib.uic.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ Now, this would not be a problem if one were a speaker of an Indo-European language, since most Indo-European speakers hold canines in great esteem.
    • Taiwanese, Mandarin, and Taiwan's language situation 11 September 2009 12:18 UTC www.pinyin.info [Source type: Original source]

    Located in Yilan County.
  • Taroko Gorge (太魯閣峽谷 Tàilǔgé)- an impressive gorge located off the east coast
  • Yangmingshan National Park (陽明山國家公園) - spanning a mountain range overlooking Taipei
  • Yushan (玉山) - at 3,996 m (9,830 ft) the highest mountain in not just Taiwan, but all East Asia

Understand

Taiwan is not usually high on the list of destinations for Western tourists. .Perhaps this is because the island's international reputation has been shaped more by its IT prowess and longstanding political disputes with mainland China than its culture or tourism, and so many assume that there is very little, if anything, of interest for the casual visitor.^ The term of office of the President and Vice-President of the People's Republic of China is the same as that of the National People's Congress, and they shall serve no more than two consecutive terms.
  • CONSTITUTION OF THE PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF CHINA 28 January 2010 1:44 UTC english.people.com.cn [Source type: Original source]

^ The Mayor's Preface is full of subtexts that speak to his political opponents in Taipei, to Taiwanese nationalists farther south on the island, to the Communist authorities and the people of mainland China, and to his future aspirations for the presidency.
  • Taiwanese, Mandarin, and Taiwan's language situation 11 September 2009 12:18 UTC www.pinyin.info [Source type: Original source]

^ But there is more open-source information available today from China and a greater degree of potential intelligence access than we have ever known.
  • MILITARY CAPABILITIES OF THE PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF CHINA 28 January 2010 1:44 UTC commdocs.house.gov [Source type: Original source]

.However, despite this general perception, Taiwan actually boasts some very impressive scenic sites, and Taipei is a vibrant center of culture and entertainment.^ If you know very little about Taiwan law and the legal system, you may want to begin with a very general source such as a research guide or an overview to the legal system.
  • Taiwan Legal Research at the University of Washington 11 September 2009 12:18 UTC lib.law.washington.edu [Source type: Academic]

^ Chinese and Taiwan scholars have been very active on the web, and there is a constantly growing number of extremely useful sites available.
  • Taiwan Legal Research at the University of Washington 11 September 2009 12:18 UTC lib.law.washington.edu [Source type: Academic]

^ A counterpart organization, the Taipei Economic and Cultural Representative Office in the United States (TECRO), has been established by the Taiwan authorities.
  • Taiwan (10/09) 28 January 2010 1:57 UTC www.state.gov [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

The island is also a center of Chinese pop culture with a huge and vibrant entertainment industry. .Taiwanese cuisine is also highly regarded among other Asians.^ Establishments serving other Asian cuisines can also be found in growing numbers in Taipei.
  • 1996 Country Commercial Guides 19 September 2009 13:27 UTC dosfan.lib.uic.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

History

.Taiwan has been populated for thousands of years by more than a dozen aboriginal tribes.^ Thousand Character Classic (4.9) - A remarkable ancient Chinese children's primer containing exactly 1000 characters, none of them used more than once.
  • Chinese Text Sampler: Readings in Chinese Literature, History, and Popular Culture 11 September 2009 12:18 UTC www-personal.umich.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ There are more “grey” nations other than Taiwan.
  • Taiwan is a Country 19 September 2009 13:27 UTC geography.about.com [Source type: Original source]

^ It roseercent9 andercentndustrial exports in those two years more than made up for the decline In agricultural exports.exchange reserves rose by moreillionew highillion .
  • PROSPECTS FOR THE GOVERNMENT OF THE REPUBLIC OF CHINA - CIA document 11 September 2009 12:18 UTC www.faqs.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.Written history begins with the partial colonization of Taiwan by the Dutch and then the Spaniards in the early 17th century.^ Politburo Standing Committee (PBSC), putting them in line for top leadership positions at the • Regarding Taiwan, President Hu’s 17th Party next Party Congress in 2012.
  • Military Power Report of People's Republic of China 2008 28 January 2010 1:44 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ The Golden Lotus (2.4) - The novel Jin Ping Mei was written by an anonymous author in the late Ming Dynasty (circa late 16th or early 17th century).
  • Chinese Text Sampler: Readings in Chinese Literature, History, and Popular Culture 11 September 2009 12:18 UTC www-personal.umich.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.(The old name of Taiwan, Formosa, comes from the Portuguese Ilha Formosa for "beautiful island".) Han Chinese immigrants who had trickled in since the end of the Yuan dynasty (1300s) arrived in larger numbers during the domestic turmoil surrounding the decline of the Ming Dynasty.^ The CPC's rival during the Chinese Civil War, the Kuomintang (KMT), fled to Taiwan and surrounding islands after its civil war defeat in 1949, claiming legitimacy over China, Mongolia, and Tuva while it was the ruling power of the Republic of China (ROC).
  • People's Republic of China - a knol by Per- Jonas Xia Mehus 28 January 2010 1:44 UTC knol.google.com [Source type: News]

^ This want for independance is not shared by all on the island of Taiwan, as from the last parliamentary results on the island, the Pro-Blue coalition (led by the KMT, which is not a so-called “Taiwanese” party as its official name is translated to be “Kuomintang of China” or “Chinese Nationalist Party”)won a majority in the elections and therefore hold control of the legislative yuan.
  • Taiwan is a Country 19 September 2009 13:27 UTC geography.about.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Cheng expelled the Dutch and established Taiwan as a base in his attempt to restore the Ming Dynasty.
  • Taiwan (10/09) 28 January 2010 1:57 UTC www.state.gov [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.Although controlled by the Dutch, the Ming loyalist Koxinga defeated the Dutch garrisons and set up Taiwan as a rump Ming Empire with the hope of reconquering Qing China.^ In 1664, a fleet led by the Ming loyalist Cheng Ch'eng-kung (Zheng Chenggong, known in the West as Koxinga) retreated from the mainland and occupied Taiwan.
  • Taiwan (10/09) 28 January 2010 1:57 UTC www.state.gov [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ MAINLAND CHINA’S OFFICIAL POSSESSION - Mainland China officially staked its claim on Taiwan in 1683, when Admiral Shi Lang of the Qing Dynasty decimated the rogue Kingdom of Tungning.
  • Taiwan is a Country 19 September 2009 13:27 UTC geography.about.com [Source type: Original source]

^ CIVIL CONFLICT - In 1662, The Fujian province of China lead by Koxinga defeated the Dutch inhabitants and took over the Island for themselves as Ming-Loyalists when the Ming Dynasty fell and the Qing dynasty began to rise.
  • Taiwan is a Country 19 September 2009 13:27 UTC geography.about.com [Source type: Original source]

His son surrendered to the Qing in the late 1600s. .Although contact between China and Taiwan dates back thousands of years, it was not until larger numbers of Han residents arrived during the Ming and Qing dynasties that Taiwan was formally integrated into China as part of Fujian province.^ And Taiwan is a part of China forever!
  • Taiwan is a Country 19 September 2009 13:27 UTC geography.about.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Taiwan has been a part of China for hundreds of years.
  • Is Taiwan a Country? 19 September 2009 13:27 UTC geography.about.com [Source type: Original source]

^ The fact is, Taiwan is part of China, and has been for centuries.
  • Taiwan is a Country 19 September 2009 13:27 UTC geography.about.com [Source type: Original source]

.It became a separate province in 1885. Defeated by the Japanese, the Qing Empire ceded Taiwan to Japan under the terms of the treaty of Shimonoseki in 1895. Japan ruled the island until 1945, and exerted profound influences on its development.^ In 1895, military defeat forced China to cede Taiwan to Japan.
  • Taiwan (Republic of China) 28 January 2010 1:44 UTC www.my-world-guide.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ In 1895, a weakened Imperial China ceded Taiwan to Japan in the Treaty of Shimonoseki following the first Sino-Japanese war.
  • Taiwan (10/09) 28 January 2010 1:57 UTC www.state.gov [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ After Qing-Dynasty China lost the First Sino-Japanese war (1894-1895), China ceded Taiwan to Japan in the Treaty of Shimonoseki.
  • Taiwan is a Country 19 September 2009 13:27 UTC geography.about.com [Source type: Original source]

.The island's entertainment and pop culture was and still is heavily influenced by that of Japan.^ He developed a political philosophy known as the Three Principles of the People which still heavily influences Chinese government today.
  • Exploring Chinese History :: Database Catalog :: Biographical Database :: Republic of China (Taiwan)- (1949- Present) 28 January 2010 1:44 UTC www.ibiblio.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Japan still has many, many locations unique to it, and a cultural history that goes back a long way.

.Much of the Japanese-built infrastructure can still be seen on the island today, and has been in fact continuously used up to the present day (e.g.^ But it still has a number of gaps, and will feel incomplete after a few days of use.

^ This republic calendar system is still used in Taiwan today.
  • Exploring Chinese History :: Database Catalog :: Biographical Database :: Republic of China (Taiwan)- (1949- Present) 28 January 2010 1:44 UTC www.ibiblio.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ I'm going to spend the next 90 days up in the Japanese Alps, searching for enlightenment among the lichen."

rail-road crossing gates, administrative buildings, and the old port at Kaohsiung).
.In the early 20th century, the Nationalists (Kuomintang, KMT) and Communists fought a major civil war in China.^ This want for independance is not shared by all on the island of Taiwan, as from the last parliamentary results on the island, the Pro-Blue coalition (led by the KMT, which is not a so-called “Taiwanese” party as its official name is translated to be “Kuomintang of China” or “Chinese Nationalist Party”)won a majority in the elections and therefore hold control of the legislative yuan.
  • Taiwan is a Country 19 September 2009 13:27 UTC geography.about.com [Source type: Original source]

^ The CPC's rival during the Chinese Civil War, the Kuomintang (KMT), fled to Taiwan and surrounding islands after its civil war defeat in 1949, claiming legitimacy over China, Mongolia, and Tuva while it was the ruling power of the Republic of China (ROC).
  • People's Republic of China - a knol by Per- Jonas Xia Mehus 28 January 2010 1:44 UTC knol.google.com [Source type: News]

^ Anyway, how could China claim that Taiwan ’stole’ their property (such as the artifacts of the National Palace Museum after the Chinese civil war) if Taiwan is part of China itself?
  • Taiwan is a Country 19 September 2009 13:27 UTC geography.about.com [Source type: Original source]

.Although the two sides were briefly united against Japan during World War II, they quickly began fighting again after the war was over.^ SKELTON. Those were overt acts that the rest of the world could see that Japan was embarking on adventurism and the rest of the world was hoping that it would stop, and then it turned into World War II in the Pacific.
  • MILITARY CAPABILITIES OF THE PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF CHINA 28 January 2010 1:44 UTC commdocs.house.gov [Source type: Original source]

^ During the period of authoritarian rule, Taiwan still managed to achieve economic prosperity and was recognized as the official government of China by the United States due to its Cold-War prejudices against communism in the PRC. .
  • Taiwan is a Country 19 September 2009 13:27 UTC geography.about.com [Source type: Original source]

^ The United States and Japan are the two main sources of Taiwan's foreign investment, jointly accounting for over half of cumulative foreign investment approvals.
  • 1996 Country Commercial Guides 19 September 2009 13:27 UTC dosfan.lib.uic.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

Eventually, the Communists were victorious. .The Nationalist government, the remnant of their army, and hundreds of thousands of supporters fled to Taiwan.^ Taiwan reverted to Chinese control after World War II. Following the Communist victory on the mainland in 1949, 2 million Nationalists fled to Taiwan and established a government using the 1946 constitution drawn up for all of China.
  • Taiwan (Republic of China) 28 January 2010 1:44 UTC www.my-world-guide.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ The major issue before the provisional government was gaining the support of Yuan Shikai, the man in charge of the Beiyang Army, the military of northern China.
  • Exploring Chinese History :: Database Catalog :: Biographical Database :: Republic of China (Taiwan)- (1949- Present) 28 January 2010 1:44 UTC www.ibiblio.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ This collection was moved from the mainland in 1949 when Chiang Kai-shek's Nationalist Party (KMT) fled to Taiwan.
  • Taiwan (10/09) 28 January 2010 1:57 UTC www.state.gov [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.From Taipei, they continued to assert their right as the sole legitimate government of all China.^ Women in the People's Republic of China enjoy equal rights with men in all spheres of life, political, economic, cultural and social, and family life.
  • CONSTITUTION OF THE PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF CHINA 28 January 2010 1:44 UTC english.people.com.cn [Source type: Original source]

^ Let the world’s governments and bodies decide who they will recognize as the legitimate government, not on opinion of individuals.
  • Taiwan is a Country 19 September 2009 13:27 UTC geography.about.com [Source type: Original source]

^ And you are right, if Taiwan merges with China, they definitely will lose their freedom.
  • Taiwan is a Country 19 September 2009 13:27 UTC geography.about.com [Source type: Original source]

.Initially repressive, the government began to loosen control under the leadership of Chiang Kai-shek's son, Chiang Ching-kuo.^ Chiang Ching-kuo .
  • Exploring Chinese History :: Database Catalog :: Biographical Database :: Republic of China (Taiwan)- (1949- Present) 28 January 2010 1:44 UTC www.ibiblio.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ INTERNAL POLITICAL CONFLICTS - After President Chiang Ching-Kuo (Chiang Kai-Shek’s son and successor) ended martial law in 1987 and appointed a native-Taiwanese vice president, Taiwan began to liberalize.
  • Taiwan is a Country 19 September 2009 13:27 UTC geography.about.com [Source type: Original source]

^ The illegally formed Democratic Progressive Party (DPP) was created in 1986, and Chiang Ching-Kuo’s successor Lee Teng-Hui began localization, in which native Taiwanese history and culture was promoted over their traditional Chinese roots.
  • Taiwan is a Country 19 September 2009 13:27 UTC geography.about.com [Source type: Original source]

.Taiwan also experienced rapid economic growth and modernisation under the leadership of Chiang Ching-kuo, becoming one of the world's richest and most modern economies and earning it a place as one of the East Asian Tigers.^ Chiang Ching-kuo .
  • Exploring Chinese History :: Database Catalog :: Biographical Database :: Republic of China (Taiwan)- (1949- Present) 28 January 2010 1:44 UTC www.ibiblio.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ INTERNAL POLITICAL CONFLICTS - After President Chiang Ching-Kuo (Chiang Kai-Shek’s son and successor) ended martial law in 1987 and appointed a native-Taiwanese vice president, Taiwan began to liberalize.
  • Taiwan is a Country 19 September 2009 13:27 UTC geography.about.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Among his accomplishments were accelerating the process of modernization to give Taiwan a 13% growth rate, $4600 per capita income, and the world's second largest foreign exchange reserves.
  • Exploring Chinese History :: Database Catalog :: Biographical Database :: Republic of China (Taiwan)- (1949- Present) 28 January 2010 1:44 UTC www.ibiblio.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

Taiwan still remains a leader in consumer electronics and is home to well-known computer brands such as Acer, Asus and HTC. Democratization began in earnest through the 1980s and 1990s, culminating with the first direct presidential elections in 1996, and the first peaceful transition of power between two political parties in 2000.
.Taiwanese politics remain dominated by the issue of relations between Taiwan and the People's Republic of China, which still claims Taiwan as a "renegade province" and regularly threatens military action if Taiwan attempts to break away from the current awkward One China status quo, where both sides agree that there is only one Chinese nation, but disagree on whether that one nation is governed by the PRC or the ROC. To summarize a very complex situation, the Pan-Blue group spearheaded by the KMT supports eventual unification with the mainland, while the Pan-Green group led by the Democratic Progressive Party (DPP) supports eventual independence.^ However, Taiwan is still a province of China, in the past, now and in the future.
  • Taiwan is a Country 19 September 2009 13:27 UTC geography.about.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Or you guys are supporting that one province of Republic Of CHINA that is TAIWAN is an independent country.
  • Taiwan is a Country 19 September 2009 13:27 UTC geography.about.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Chinese people living in China are brainwashed.
  • Is Taiwan a Country? 19 September 2009 13:27 UTC geography.about.com [Source type: Original source]

.The split extends down to trivial issues like Chinese romanization — the KMT prefers the mainland's hanyu pinyin, the DPP prefers a Taiwan-made variant called tongyong pinyin — and political demonstrations and rallies, always turbulent, on occasion turn violent.^ In sharp contrast to the tenets of both KMT and P.R.C. policy, a number of prominent DPP politicians openly advocate independence for Taiwan.
  • Taiwan (10/09) 28 January 2010 1:57 UTC www.state.gov [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ While the majority of the political, labor, and student demonstrations and marches are non-violent, some have on occasion become confrontational.
  • Korea, Republic of 20 November 2009 10:28 UTC travel.state.gov [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Chiang Kai-shek's current popularity in Taiwan is sharply divided among political lines, enjoying greater support among KMT voters and the mainlander population.
  • Exploring Chinese History :: Database Catalog :: Biographical Database :: Republic of China (Taiwan)- (1949- Present) 28 January 2010 1:44 UTC www.ibiblio.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

People

.Taiwan was originally populated by indigenous tribes that spoke various Austronesian languages, which are related to Malay, Tagalog and Bahasa Indonesia.^ HISTORY Taiwan's indigenous peoples, who originated in Austronesia and southern Asia, have lived on Taiwan for 12,000 to 15,000 years.
  • Taiwan (10/09) 28 January 2010 1:57 UTC www.state.gov [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ THE INDIGENOUS INHABITANTS - Taiwan was originally settled around 4000 years ago by people of Malaysian and Polynesian decent (these later became the so-named “indigenous” Taiwanese which comprise a whopping 2% of Taiwan’s population).
  • Taiwan is a Country 19 September 2009 13:27 UTC geography.about.com [Source type: Original source]

^ In contrast, the citizens of Taiwan are discouraged from writing their native languages (viz., Taiwanese, Hakka, and various aboriginal languages) and it is only recently that it has been possible to teach them in the schools.
  • Taiwanese, Mandarin, and Taiwan's language situation 11 September 2009 12:18 UTC www.pinyin.info [Source type: Original source]

.Today these people form only about 2% of the population, with the other 98% being from China mainland.^ The relationship between China, the United States, and other countries is complicated, and the debate about China and Taiwan is reemerging in our Country.
  • MILITARY CAPABILITIES OF THE PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF CHINA 28 January 2010 1:44 UTC commdocs.house.gov [Source type: Original source]

^ It seems to me highly unlikely that Taiwan, 23 million people vis-a-vis 1.3 billion on the mainland, and has only defensive weapons, is going to attack the mainland first.
  • MILITARY CAPABILITIES OF THE PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF CHINA 28 January 2010 1:44 UTC commdocs.house.gov [Source type: Original source]

^ If you look at the number of people speaking the southern Fukien dialect in Taiwan, mainland China, and Southeast Asia, it's quite significant.
  • Taiwanese, Mandarin, and Taiwan's language situation 11 September 2009 12:18 UTC www.pinyin.info [Source type: Original source]

.The Chinese are further split into Taiwanese forming about 84% of the population, whose families migrated during the Ming and Qing Dynasties, as well as mainlanders, forming about 14% of the population, whose families fled to Taiwan from mainland China after the communist takeover in 1949. Among the Taiwanese group, Hoklo (Minnan) speakers form the majority, which is about 70% of the population while the remaining 14% are largely Hakka speakers.^ What is Taiwan's relationship to mainland China?
  • Is Taiwan a Country? 19 September 2009 13:27 UTC geography.about.com [Source type: Original source]
  • Taiwan is a Country 19 September 2009 13:27 UTC geography.about.com [Source type: Original source]

^ The post-1949 Republic of China on Taiwan .
  • Taiwan Legal Research at the University of Washington 11 September 2009 12:18 UTC lib.law.washington.edu [Source type: Academic]

^ Well, that what I think about Taiwan and China.
  • Is Taiwan a Country? 19 September 2009 13:27 UTC geography.about.com [Source type: Original source]

There is also a sizeable Japanese community, many of whom work in the entertainment industry. The previous Japanese population that was largely centered on the East Coast while Taiwan was under Japanese rule left after WWII.

Climate

Taiwan has a marine tropical climate, meaning cool winters (8°C at night) and sweltering, humid summers (above 30°C, 86°F) from Jun-Sep. .The best time of year to visit is thus from Oct-Dec, although occasional typhoons can spoil the fun.^ The best times to visit are between 8:00 and 11:00 PM on Fridays or Saturdays.

^ Ninety percent of women marry in their twenties, although the average age of first-time brides has increased from 20.4 years in 1950 to 25.9 years in 1997.
  • Culture of South Korea - History and ethnic relations , Urbanism, architecture, and the use of space 20 November 2009 10:28 UTC www.everyculture.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

Spring is also nice, although it rains more than during autumn. During the typhoon season, the east coast bears the brunt of the damage as it is facing the Pacific Ocean.
.However, you might encounter temperate conditions when you head into mountainous regions.^ Sapporo can be beautiful in the winter, but it's also a great place to start a hiking trip from into the mountainous regions farther east during the summer.

.In fact, it snows every year on Taiwan's highest mountains and occasionally on mountains like Alishan so be prepared if visiting Taiwan's mountainous regions.^ He returned to Taiwan in 1968 to become visiting professor of political science at the National Taiwan University, serving as chairman of the Political Science Department and dean of the Graduate Institute of Political Science the following year.
  • Exploring Chinese History :: Database Catalog :: Biographical Database :: Republic of China (Taiwan)- (1949- Present) 28 January 2010 1:44 UTC www.ibiblio.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ He passed the bar exams before the completion of his junior year with the highest score, earning him the distinction of being Taiwan's youngest lawyer.
  • Exploring Chinese History :: Database Catalog :: Biographical Database :: Republic of China (Taiwan)- (1949- Present) 28 January 2010 1:44 UTC www.ibiblio.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

Taiwanese calendar

.The Minguo (民國) calendar, counting years from the establishment of the ROC (1911), is commonly used in Taiwan, so don't be too surprised to find dates like "98-05-03" on tickets or bags of chips — ROC 98 is 2009 AD. To convert a Minguo date to A.D., just add 11. Months and days are according to the standard Gregorian calendar.^ Two years later, the Spanish established a settlement on the northwest coast of Taiwan, which they occupied until 1642 when they were driven out by the Dutch.
  • Taiwan (10/09) 28 January 2010 1:57 UTC www.state.gov [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ UTC (or GMT/Zulu)-time used: Friday, September 4, 2009 at 03:01:05 UTC is Coordinated Universal Time, GMT is Greenwich Mean Time.
  • The World Clock (long version) 19 September 2009 13:27 UTC www.timeanddate.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Dates before October 1582 are given in the Julian calendar, not in the proleptic Gregorian calendar.
  • Exploring Chinese History :: Database Catalog :: Biographical Database :: Republic of China (Taiwan)- (1949- Present) 28 January 2010 1:44 UTC www.ibiblio.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

Festivals

.As Taiwan is dominated by ethnic Chinese, traditional Chinese festivals are celebrated by the Taiwanese.^ Along with the political status of Taiwan, it is disputed whether Taiwanese culture is a segment of Chinese culture (due to the Han ethnicity and a shared language and traditional customs with mainland Chinese) or a distinct culture separate from Chinese culture (due to the long period of recent political separation and the past colonization of Taiwan).
  • Taiwan (Republic of China) 28 January 2010 1:44 UTC www.my-world-guide.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ The DPP has sought to identify itself with the Taiwanese (ethnic Chinese who immigrated to Taiwan during the past 300 years, mostly from Fujian Province).
  • 1996 Country Commercial Guides 19 September 2009 13:27 UTC dosfan.lib.uic.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ TAIWANESE i believe so, NOT CHINESE… ive seen countries with 12000 people and they are already a country themselves, and taiwan with 23 million people is still not an independent country?!
  • Is Taiwan a Country? 19 September 2009 13:27 UTC geography.about.com [Source type: Original source]

Among the most notable are:
  • Chinese New Year (春節)
.This is the most important festival for the Taiwanese and many shops and restaurants close on the first three days so it is not an ideal time to visit.^ And most places will let you store your big bags there while you go on a short trip for a few days (if you want to travel light at that time.

^ For instance, (1) the primary goal of most fish is to avoid detection, or avoid being exposed during certain times of the day.

^ To show the depth of feeling that many Taiwanese have for their native language, I would like to close with a poem by Chen Lei (b.
  • Taiwanese, Mandarin, and Taiwan's language situation 11 September 2009 12:18 UTC www.pinyin.info [Source type: Original source]

.However, the days leading up to the festival as well as the fourth to fifteenth days are ideal for soaking up the atmosphere and listening to Chinese New Year songs.^ At the rates of demand it experiences, the system has historically been subject to overcrowding during travel seasons such as Chunyun during Chinese New Year.
  • People's Republic of China - a knol by Per- Jonas Xia Mehus 28 January 2010 1:44 UTC knol.google.com [Source type: News]

^ Last time I also checked, Singapore is an independent country, and Korean are clebrating Chinese New Year and worships Confucius.
  • Is Taiwan a Country? 19 September 2009 13:27 UTC geography.about.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Twelve years after the law, only one Chinese city was making an effort to clean up its water discharges.
  • People's Republic of China - a knol by Per- Jonas Xia Mehus 28 January 2010 1:44 UTC knol.google.com [Source type: News]

  • Ching Ming Festival (清明節)
This is when many Taiwanese would pay respects at their ancestors' graves.
  • Dragon Boat Festival (端午節)
.This festival honours Qu Yuan, a patriotic official from the state of Chu during the Warring States period of Chinese history who committed suicide by jumping into a river when Chu was conquered by Qin.^ Chiang's strategy during the War opposed the strategies of both Mao Zedong and the United States.
  • Exploring Chinese History :: Database Catalog :: Biographical Database :: Republic of China (Taiwan)- (1949- Present) 28 January 2010 1:44 UTC www.ibiblio.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ He has stated that it was during this period that he realized the unfairness of the political system in Taiwan and became politically active as a member of the Tangwai movement.
  • Exploring Chinese History :: Database Catalog :: Biographical Database :: Republic of China (Taiwan)- (1949- Present) 28 January 2010 1:44 UTC www.ibiblio.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ The PRC officially recognizes 56 distinct ethnic groups, the largest of which are the Han Chinese, who constitute about 91.9% of the total population.
  • People's Republic of China - a knol by Per- Jonas Xia Mehus 28 January 2010 1:44 UTC knol.google.com [Source type: News]

To prevent the fishes from eating his body, villagers threw rice dumplings into the river to feed the fishes and rowed dragon boats with drums being beaten on them to scare away the fishes. .Since then, dragon boat racing has been carried out on this day and rice dumplings are also eaten.^ Dates for the three festivals -- which include Chinese Lunar New Year day, Dragon Boat Festival, and Mid-Autumn (Moon) Festival -- change with the lunar calendar.
  • 1996 Country Commercial Guides 19 September 2009 13:27 UTC dosfan.lib.uic.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ The popular Chinese dragon boat racing ( 龙舟 ) occurs during the Dragon Boat Festival.
  • People's Republic of China - a knol by Per- Jonas Xia Mehus 28 January 2010 1:44 UTC knol.google.com [Source type: News]

  • Hungry Ghost Festival (中元節)
.This festival runs throughout the seventh month of the Chinese calendar.^ Dates for the three festivals -- which include Chinese Lunar New Year day, Dragon Boat Festival, and Mid-Autumn (Moon) Festival -- change with the lunar calendar.
  • 1996 Country Commercial Guides 19 September 2009 13:27 UTC dosfan.lib.uic.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.It is believed that the gates of hell open during this period and hungry ghosts are allowed to roam freely into our world.^ During the administration of President Chen, Taiwan lobbied strongly for admission into the United Nations and other international organizations, such as the World Health Organization (WHO).
  • Taiwan (10/09) 28 January 2010 1:57 UTC www.state.gov [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

In order to appease the ghosts and prevent misfortune, many Taiwanese will offer food and burn joss paper for them. .In addition, traditional Chinese performances such as Chinese opera and puppet shows are held to appease these wandering spirits.^ They further argue that many important aspects of traditional Chinese morals and culture, such as Confucianism, Chinese art, literature, and performing arts like Beijing opera, were altered to conform to government policies and propaganda at the time.
  • People's Republic of China - a knol by Per- Jonas Xia Mehus 28 January 2010 1:44 UTC knol.google.com [Source type: News]

^ Chinese Taiwan-held island such as Pratas or Itu Aba.
  • Military Power Report of People's Republic of China 2008 28 January 2010 1:44 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ These teas can either be purchased in attractive packages for use at home or sampled in one of the island's many traditional Chinese-style tea houses.
  • 1996 Country Commercial Guides 19 September 2009 13:27 UTC dosfan.lib.uic.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

  • Mid-Autumn Festival (中秋節)
.Legend has it that on this day, a woman known as Chang E swallowed some divine pills to prevent her power hungry husband from becoming immortal.^ In the legend, Tan'gun was born of a divine father, Hwan-ung, a son of the heavenly king, and a woman who had been transformed from a bear.
  • Culture of South Korea - History and ethnic relations , Urbanism, architecture, and the use of space 20 November 2009 10:28 UTC www.everyculture.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Three days before Chen's inauguration, the Taiwan Affairs Office of the People's Republic of China issued what has become known as the May 17 Declaration.
  • Exploring Chinese History :: Database Catalog :: Biographical Database :: Republic of China (Taiwan)- (1949- Present) 28 January 2010 1:44 UTC www.ibiblio.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

Afraid of being killed by her husband, she fled to the moon and it is believed that the moon shines brightest on this day. This is when many lanterns will be put up for decoration in various parks and shops, which is quite a beautiful sight. .Mooncakes are also eaten on this day so it would be an ideal time to try some.^ Some hostels don't care if you stay more than 3 days, if you pay for one day at a time.

Cliffs meet the eastern coast of Taiwan, Hualien County
Cliffs meet the eastern coast of Taiwan, Hualien County
.Taiwan is largely mountainous with a chain of mountains running from north to south at the centre of the island.^ In the South China Sea, China claims exclusive sovereignty over the Spratly and Paracel island groups – claims disputed by Brunei, the Philippines, Malaysia, Taiwan, and Vietnam.
  • Military Power Report of People's Republic of China 2008 28 January 2010 1:44 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Terrain: Two thirds of the island is largely mountainous with 100 peaks over 3,000 meters (9,843 ft.
  • Taiwan (10/09) 28 January 2010 1:57 UTC www.state.gov [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ More than 80 percent of the U.S.- made process control systems sold in Taiwan go to state-run firms and large-scale private enterprises.
  • 1996 Country Commercial Guides 19 September 2009 13:27 UTC dosfan.lib.uic.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.The west coast is largely plains and unsurprisingly is where most of the population is concentrated, and is where all the larger cities like Taichung and Kaohsiung are located.^ Department Stores: There are over 50 department stores on Taiwan, concentrated in the large cities.
  • 1996 Country Commercial Guides 19 September 2009 13:27 UTC dosfan.lib.uic.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Taiwan also has a large population (23million) that all agree that Taiwan should be its own country.
  • Is Taiwan a Country? 19 September 2009 13:27 UTC geography.about.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Twelve-day tours to the West Coast, including two nights in Hawaii, continue to be the most popular tours.
  • 1996 Country Commercial Guides 19 September 2009 13:27 UTC dosfan.lib.uic.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.The east coast also has some plains but are more sparsely populated due to the higher typhoon risk, but is also home to the cities of Hualien and Taitung with significant populations.^ Bunun The Bunun's original home was on Taiwan's west coast, in the central and northern plains, but some have more recently settled in the area around Taitung and Hualien.
  • Taiwan (Republic of China) 28 January 2010 1:44 UTC www.my-world-guide.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ However, an independent survey by East China Normal University estimated the Christian population at 40 million, much higher than the government's numbers but much lower than numbers favored by some Western observers.
  • People's Republic of China - a knol by Per- Jonas Xia Mehus 28 January 2010 1:44 UTC knol.google.com [Source type: News]

Sports

.Baseball was brought to Taiwan by the Japanese during the colonial period.^ His works often depict with the struggles of Taiwan intellectuals in coping with Japanese colonization and critique the delusion of enlightenment brought about by the apparent modernity of his society.
  • Chinese Text Sampler: Readings in Chinese Literature, History, and Popular Culture 11 September 2009 12:18 UTC www-personal.umich.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ The Japanese colonial experience in Taiwan was partially liberating for those who wished to write in Taiwanese, but the focus was very much on education and writing in Japanese.
  • Taiwanese, Mandarin, and Taiwan's language situation 11 September 2009 12:18 UTC www.pinyin.info [Source type: Original source]

^ He has stated that it was during this period that he realized the unfairness of the political system in Taiwan and became politically active as a member of the Tangwai movement.
  • Exploring Chinese History :: Database Catalog :: Biographical Database :: Republic of China (Taiwan)- (1949- Present) 28 January 2010 1:44 UTC www.ibiblio.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.Its popularity rose greatly when the Taiwanese baseball team finished second in the Japanese national championships.^ Karaoke is incredibly popular in Taiwan, where it is known as KTV and is an example of something the Taiwanese have drawn from contemporary Japanese culture.
  • Taiwan (Republic of China) 28 January 2010 1:44 UTC www.my-world-guide.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.Today, baseball retains a strong following and remains by far the most popular team sport in Taiwan.^ A potential military confrontation with Taiwan, and the prospect of U.S. military intervention, remain the PLA’s most immediate military concerns.
  • Military Power Report of People's Republic of China 2008 28 January 2010 1:44 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ So by asking yourself the following you will know if Taiwan is a country: “are you a human being if most people say you’re not?” .
  • Is Taiwan a Country? 19 September 2009 13:27 UTC geography.about.com [Source type: Original source]

^ The United States remains the most popular destination outside of Asia, with 453,924 visitors in 1994 (an increase of 22.1 percent from 1993) according to Taiwan statistics.
  • 1996 Country Commercial Guides 19 September 2009 13:27 UTC dosfan.lib.uic.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.Several Taiwanese players have also gone on to successful careers in MLB and the Taiwanese national baseball team is considered to be one of the strongest in the world.^ In particular, press control is notoriously tight: the controversial organization Reporters Without Borders considers the PRC one of the least free countries in the world for the press.
  • People's Republic of China - a knol by Per- Jonas Xia Mehus 28 January 2010 1:44 UTC knol.google.com [Source type: News]

^ China has one of the oldest sporting cultures in the world, spanning the course of several millennia.
  • People's Republic of China - a knol by Per- Jonas Xia Mehus 28 January 2010 1:44 UTC knol.google.com [Source type: News]

Besides baseball, basketball also has a sizeable following in Taiwan. Other sports which are popular include Taekwondo, table tennis and golf.

Get in

Visa Information

.Citizens of 31 countries, including the U.S., Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Ireland, and most other EU members and Switzerland, may enter Taiwan visa-free for up to 30 days (90 days for citizens of Japan and the UK) provided that their passports do not expire within six months.^ Check with your nearest embassy, but for most western countries (including England, Canada, Australia, and the U.S,) you can just enter Japan and stay up to 90 days (This is called "a temporary tourist visa."

^ It is authorized to issue visas, accept passport applications, and provide assistance to U.S. citizens in Taiwan.
  • Taiwan (10/09) 28 January 2010 1:57 UTC www.state.gov [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ However, Taiwan has signed bilateral agreements with 20 nations including 12 EU countries, South Africa, Singapore, Korea, New Zealand, Australia, Finland, Sweden, and Switzerland to implement ATA carnet.
  • 1996 Country Commercial Guides 19 September 2009 13:27 UTC dosfan.lib.uic.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.Residents of Hong Kong and Macau who hold valid SAR passports should apply for an entry permit, which can be done on arrival or online before departure if they were born in their respective territories or have been to Taiwan previously after 1983. From July 2008, holders of mainland Chinese passports may visit Taiwan for tourism if they join an approved guided tour.^ Together with refugee businessmen from the mainland, they managed Taiwan's transition from an agricultural to a commercial, industrial economy.
  • Taiwan (10/09) 28 January 2010 1:57 UTC www.state.gov [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ We may take it for granted that a child born in Taiwan of Taiwanese-speaking parents will begin his or her life speaking Taiwanese.
  • Taiwanese, Mandarin, and Taiwan's language situation 11 September 2009 12:18 UTC www.pinyin.info [Source type: Original source]

^ Sun was a uniting figure in post-imperial China, and remains unique among 20th century Chinese politicians for being widely revered in both mainland China and Taiwan.
  • Exploring Chinese History :: Database Catalog :: Biographical Database :: Republic of China (Taiwan)- (1949- Present) 28 January 2010 1:44 UTC www.ibiblio.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.For further information consult the Bureau of Consular Affairs [4].^ Consular Affairs Publications , which contain information on obtaining passports and planning a safe trip abroad, are also available at http://www.travel.state.gov .
  • Taiwan (10/09) 28 January 2010 1:57 UTC www.state.gov [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ The Office of Electronic Information, Bureau of Public Affairs, manages this site as a portal for information from the U.S. State Department.
  • Taiwan (10/09) 28 January 2010 1:57 UTC www.state.gov [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]
  • Taiwan 28 January 2010 1:57 UTC www.state.gov [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Home » Under Secretary for Public Diplomacy and Public Affairs » Bureau of Public Affairs » Bureau of Public Affairs: Electronic Information and Publications Office » Background Notes » Taiwan (10/09) .
  • Taiwan (10/09) 28 January 2010 1:57 UTC www.state.gov [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

By plane

.Taiwan's main international gateway is Taiwan Taoyuan near Taipei, with Kaohsiung a distant second and very limited international services to Taichung and Hualien.^ The democratization process continued with the first direct elections of the Mayors of Taiwan's two largest cities (Taipei and Kaohsiung) and the Governor of Taiwan Province in December 1994.
  • 1996 Country Commercial Guides 19 September 2009 13:27 UTC dosfan.lib.uic.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Taiwan is divided into counties, provincial municipalities, and two special municipalities, Taipei and Kaohsiung.
  • Taiwan (10/09) 28 January 2010 1:57 UTC www.state.gov [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ CTC tenders may be local (limited to firms with a Taiwan office or representative) or international (open to firms outside of Taiwan), but both kinds of tenders are generally conducted fairly and openly.
  • 1996 Country Commercial Guides 19 September 2009 13:27 UTC dosfan.lib.uic.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.
  • Taiwan Taoyuan International Airport (formerly Chiang Kai-Shek International Airport) [5] (TPE) is Taiwan's main international airport.^ The Communists were thus pushed into the interior as Chiang Kai-shek sought to destroy them, and Chiang consolidated rule, establishing a Nationalist Government in Nanjing in 1928.
    • Taiwan (Republic of China) 28 January 2010 1:44 UTC www.my-world-guide.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ It just takes hardly 45 minutes to drive to the Chang Kai Shek International Airport from the Grand Formosa Regent Hotel in Taipei and just 15 minutes to drive to the Taipei Song Shan Airport.
    • Grand Formosa Regent Taipei, Taiwan 22 September 2009 21:10 UTC www.asiarooms.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ Chiang Kai-shek established a "provisional" Republic of China (R.O.C.) capital in Taipei in December 1949.
    • Taiwan (10/09) 28 January 2010 1:57 UTC www.state.gov [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    .Located 40km to the southwest of Taipei, it has good connections to major Asian cities and North America.^ The Location of Grand Formosa Regent Hotel in Taipei is in the center of the city which is the commercial, financial and the social hub of city.
    • Grand Formosa Regent Taipei, Taiwan 22 September 2009 21:10 UTC www.asiarooms.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ The palaces, shrines, and other vestiges of the Choson Dynasty are still prominent features of the city north of the Han River, serving as major tourist attractions.
    • Culture of South Korea - History and ethnic relations , Urbanism, architecture, and the use of space 20 November 2009 10:28 UTC www.everyculture.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ For travel within Taipei and various other major cities, taxi drivers are obliged to use the meter to calculate the fare.
    • 1996 Country Commercial Guides 19 September 2009 13:27 UTC dosfan.lib.uic.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    .The airport has direct buses to Taipei, Taichung and other nearby cities.^ The democratization process continued with the first direct elections of the Mayors of Taiwan's two largest cities (Taipei and Kaohsiung) and the Governor of Taiwan Province in December 1994.
    • 1996 Country Commercial Guides 19 September 2009 13:27 UTC dosfan.lib.uic.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ For travel within Taipei and various other major cities, taxi drivers are obliged to use the meter to calculate the fare.
    • 1996 Country Commercial Guides 19 September 2009 13:27 UTC dosfan.lib.uic.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ Although normal precautions should be taken by visitors, the streets of Taipei and other cities are safe at any hour.
    • 1996 Country Commercial Guides 19 September 2009 13:27 UTC dosfan.lib.uic.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    .Alternatively, the U-Bus company operates shuttles to HSR Taoyuan station for high-speed train connections to Hsinchu, Taichung, Chiayi, Tainan, and Kaohsiung; and to Jhongli Transit Station, for mainline TRA train and southbound bus connections to Tainan, Hsinchu etc.
  • Songshan Airport [6] (TSA) in downtown Taipei serves mostly domestic flights only, plus limited daily charter flights to mainland China.
  • The Kaohsiung [7] (KHH) domestic and international airports are located in the same complex.^ At the same time, China has reached out to the international community to form joint ventures and gain greater access to the latest technologies and the world's capital markets.
    • IAS Plus - Jurisdictional Updates - China 28 January 2010 1:44 UTC www.iasplus.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ A wide variety of domestic and international human rights groups generally operated without restriction by authorities, investigating and publishing their findings on human rights cases.
    • Taiwan 28 January 2010 1:57 UTC www.state.gov [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ More than one million Taiwan people are estimated to be residing in China, and more than 70,000 Taiwan companies have operations there.
    • Taiwan (10/09) 28 January 2010 1:57 UTC www.state.gov [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    .International flights are only to other Asian cities, as well as charter flights to mainland China.
  • Taichung Airport (RMQ) serves domestic flights as well as international flights to Hong Kong and Vietnam and cross-strait charters to mainland China.
  • Hualien Airport [8] (HUN) serves domestic flights as well as some international charter flights to Japan, South Korea (ROK) and Macau.^ China borders 14 nations (counted clockwise from south): Vietnam, Laos, Burma, India, Bhutan, Nepal, Pakistan, [51] Afghanistan, Tajikistan, Kyrgyzstan, Kazakhstan, Russia, Mongolia and North Korea.
    • People's Republic of China - a knol by Per- Jonas Xia Mehus 28 January 2010 1:44 UTC knol.google.com [Source type: News]

    ^ Search for some other city Personal World Clock - shows just the cities you need Meeting Planner - find a suitable time for an international meeting Time Zone Converter - Convert time between two time zones.
    • The World Clock - Time Zones - North America 19 September 2009 13:27 UTC www.timeanddate.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ Today, the People's Republic of China has dozens of major cities with one million or more long-term residents, including the three global cities of Beijing, Hong Kong, and Shanghai.
    • People's Republic of China - a knol by Per- Jonas Xia Mehus 28 January 2010 1:44 UTC knol.google.com [Source type: News]

    It is also one of the airports designated to serve cross-strait direct flights.
.In addition, the airports at Makung, Taitung and Kinmen have also been designated for cross-strait flights to mainland China, though of these, only Makung currently has regular flights to mainland China.^ President Ma has moved quickly to resume the SEF-ARATS dialogue, expand charter flights, and take other steps to enhance cross-Strait relations.
  • Taiwan (10/09) 28 January 2010 1:57 UTC www.state.gov [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ These flights are open to mainland tourists, as well as Taiwan and foreign travelers.
  • Taiwan (10/09) 28 January 2010 1:57 UTC www.state.gov [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ In July 2008, Taiwan and P.R.C. carriers began operating cross-Strait charter flights every weekend.
  • Taiwan (10/09) 28 January 2010 1:57 UTC www.state.gov [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.After a break of 60 years, regular cross-Strait flights between Taiwan and China started on 4 Jul 2008. From 15 Dec 2008, the frequency of these flights were increased to daily, and travel times on some popular routes have been reduced significantly as flights no longer have to be routed through Hong Kong airspace.^ Taiwan has been a part of China for hundreds of years.
  • Is Taiwan a Country? 19 September 2009 13:27 UTC geography.about.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Meanwhile, Communist China had no ability to cross the strait to reunite Taiwan island at that time.
  • Is Taiwan a Country? 19 September 2009 13:27 UTC geography.about.com [Source type: Original source]

^ At the same time, the appreciation of the New Taiwan dollar (NTD), rising labor costs, and increasing environmental consciousness in Taiwan caused many labor-intensive industries, such as shoe manufacturing, to move to China and Southeast Asia.
  • Taiwan (10/09) 28 January 2010 1:57 UTC www.state.gov [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.Previously, the usual practice was to fly via either Hong Kong or Macau, which have good connections both ways.^ Exact figures are difficult to obtain, as much Taiwan investment in the P.R.C. is via Hong Kong and other third-party jurisdictions.
  • Taiwan (10/09) 28 January 2010 1:57 UTC www.state.gov [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ The twenty-two provinces, five autonomous regions and four municipalities can be collectively referred to as "mainland China", a term which usually excludes Hong Kong and Macau .
  • People's Republic of China - a knol by Per- Jonas Xia Mehus 28 January 2010 1:44 UTC knol.google.com [Source type: News]

^ The term "Mainland China" is often used to denote the areas under PRC rule, but usually excludes its two Special Administrative Regions: Hong Kong and Macau.
  • People's Republic of China - a knol by Per- Jonas Xia Mehus 28 January 2010 1:44 UTC knol.google.com [Source type: News]

Major airlines

.The main Taiwanese carriers are China Airlines [9] and EVA Air [10].^ China is developing air- and ground-launched LACMs, such as the YJ-63 and DH-10 systems for stand-off, precision strikes.
  • Military Power Report of People's Republic of China 2008 28 January 2010 1:44 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.China Airlines has a relatively poor safety record (12 major crashes in 30 years [11]), whereas EVA Air is ranked one of the safest airlines in the world; as a result, many opt for EVA Air whenever possible.^ China is one of the countries with the longest histories in the world .
  • CONSTITUTION OF THE PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF CHINA 28 January 2010 1:44 UTC english.people.com.cn [Source type: Original source]

^ January 5, 2009 at 7:17 pm (58) motherland says: From China’s perspective, there is only one China in the world.
  • Is Taiwan a Country? 19 September 2009 13:27 UTC geography.about.com [Source type: Original source]

^ In the words of one high-ranking Administration official, if we treat China as an enemy, it most assuredly will become one.
  • MILITARY CAPABILITIES OF THE PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF CHINA 28 January 2010 1:44 UTC commdocs.house.gov [Source type: Original source]

  • AirAsia X (LCC) from/to Kuala Lumpur only.
  • Cathay Pacific - 2715 2333
  • China Airlines - 2715 1212
  • EVA Airways - 2501 1999
  • Jetstar Asia (LCC) from/to Singapore only.
  • KLM Asia - 2711 4055
  • Malaysia Airlines
  • Northwest - 2772 2188
  • Silkair
  • Singapore Airlines - 2551 6655
  • Thai Airways - 2509 6800
  • United Airlines
  • Vietnam Airlines
.For up-to-date information on cheap flights, check the advertisement pages of one of the three local daily English newspapers (see media below).^ Registration will make your presence and whereabouts known in case it is necessary to contact you in an emergency and will enable you to receive up-to-date information on security conditions.
  • Taiwan (10/09) 28 January 2010 1:57 UTC www.state.gov [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ A local partner can give the best advice on where and how to advertise, but participation in the major trade shows and advertisement in the relevant Taiwan trade journals and industry newspapers is important.
  • 1996 Country Commercial Guides 19 September 2009 13:27 UTC dosfan.lib.uic.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Page 28 PREV PAGE TOP OF DOC     The Russo-Chinese relationship is now one of long standing and it is continuing to evolve, as this morning's newspapers indicated.
  • MILITARY CAPABILITIES OF THE PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF CHINA 28 January 2010 1:44 UTC commdocs.house.gov [Source type: Original source]

By boat

.As of 2008, all scheduled passenger ferry services between Taiwan and Japan have been suspended.^ Telecom services providers are expected to benefit from the planned signing of a financial MOU between Taiwan and China, through which they will be able...
  • Login to DIGITIMES archive & research 20 November 2009 10:28 UTC www.digitimes.com [Source type: General]

.Star Cruises [12] operates limited cruise services from Keelung and Kaohsiung to Hong Kong and various Japanese islands.^ China’s ground doctrine for “active defense” warfare and new forces are placing emphasis on integrated operations operational methods across the various services.
  • Military Power Report of People's Republic of China 2008 28 January 2010 1:44 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

From Fuzhou, China, there are two daily ferries to Matsu. .Take bus 69 from Fuzhou train station to Wuyilu, then bus 73 to the end station Mawei harbor.^ Example: If you are in Tokyo station, and you want to go to Gotunda station you would want to take the JR train, using the Yamanote line.

^ You can ride from one end of the line to the other, and back for the price of the cheapest ticket on the line (as long as you don't leave the train and exit one of the stations along the way.

^ Lockers:     Many train and bus stations have pay lockers where you can store your bags if you want to walk around a city for a few days.

.The ferry costs ¥350 from China and $1300 from Taiwan.^ Taiwan is China’s single largest source of foreign direct investment, and an extended campaign would wreck Taiwan’s economic infrastructure, leading to high reconstruction costs.
  • Military Power Report of People's Republic of China 2008 28 January 2010 1:44 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

The trip takes two hours. The old website, mit30.com.tw, appears to be down. From Matsu, there are two daily ferries to Keelung in Taiwan. $1050 includes a bed, as the trip takes 10 hours. Bookings can be made at +886 2 2424 6868
.At Mawei harbour in Fuzhou there is an opportunity to buy an inclusive ticket all the way to Taipei that includes the Fuzhou to Matsu ferry above and a domestic flight from Matsu to Taipei (or Taichung).^ For Japan, you must buy a stamp for 2000 yen on your way to the international departure gates, and present the stamp to customs there.

^ When you want to buy a ticket, look for a ticket machine that accepts a train card (not all machines do.

^ There are also several domestic airports and domestic airlines that provide fast and convenient connecting flights between Taiwan's larger cities, as well as outlying islands.
  • 1996 Country Commercial Guides 19 September 2009 13:27 UTC dosfan.lib.uic.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.The price (780RMB) includes transfer between port and airport on Matsu, and a coupon for lunch at the airport while you wait for your connection.^ When you get your plane ticket, you'll want to arrive at Narita Airport, if you plan on spending most of your time in Tokyo.

^ There are a number of ways to transfer funds from Japan to your home country, but each method has drawbacks, and you really need to shop around to get the best deal.

^ Processing your ticket will take a while, and then you have to wait in several lines as you try to get to your gate.

The ferry leaves Fuzhou at 9:30AM. Get to Mawei at 8AM to buy tickets.
.There are also several ferry services between Xiamen and Quanzhou on the mainland and the island of Kinmen.^ ADMINISTRATION The authorities in Taipei exercise control over Taiwan, Kinmen, Matsu, Penghu (Pescadores) and several other smaller islands.
  • Taiwan (10/09) 28 January 2010 1:57 UTC www.state.gov [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ It was governed under a corrupt military administration leading to widespread island unrest and increasing tensions between Taiwanese and mainlanders.
  • Taiwan (Republic of China) 28 January 2010 1:44 UTC www.my-world-guide.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

Domestic plane, Taiwan
Domestic plane, Taiwan

By plane

.Taiwan's main domestic carriers are Mandarin Airlines [13], a China Airlines subsidiary; UNI Air [14], controlled by EVA; and TransAsia Airways [15].^ The fact remains that Mandarin is the prestige language of the People's Republic of China, the Republic of China on Taiwan, the Republic of Singapore, and the Hongkong Special Administrative Region.
  • Taiwanese, Mandarin, and Taiwan's language situation 11 September 2009 12:18 UTC www.pinyin.info [Source type: Original source]

^ In a June 2004 meeting with expatriates in San Francisco, she proposed to officially rename her country "Taiwan Republic of China" to pacify domestic disputes over Taiwan's identity.
  • Exploring Chinese History :: Database Catalog :: Biographical Database :: Republic of China (Taiwan)- (1949- Present) 28 January 2010 1:44 UTC www.ibiblio.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Analysts in and out of government project that China could not have an operational, domestically-produced carrier before 2015.
  • Military Power Report of People's Republic of China 2008 28 January 2010 1:44 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.Flights are frequent, and it is usually unnecessary to book flights in advance.^ Book your flight in advance.

.Taipei and Kaohsiung have regular services and links to most other domestic airports; however, it may not be possible to fly from one domestic airport to another.^ Principal Growth Sectors As in other developed economies, services are the sector growing most rapidly.
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^ Sometimes, you may need to take the JR line to one station, walk outside and downstairs to the underground, and then buy another ticket to hop the subway.

^ The Shinkansen (bullet train owned by JR) is the fastest and most expensive, and is good for going from one end of the country to the other.

.The popularity of the high-speed train has drastically cut flights on the once popular west coast sectors, with eg.^ Twelve-day tours to the West Coast, including two nights in Hawaii, continue to be the most popular tours.
  • 1996 Country Commercial Guides 19 September 2009 13:27 UTC dosfan.lib.uic.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.Taipei-Kaohsiung flights only a shadow of what they once were.^ The only catch is that you have to buy the entire collection at once, they won't sell those books singly.

.If you want to visit Taiwan's smaller islands, the plane is still the best option, and is the only practical option of travelling to Penghu, Kinmen or Matsu.^ A personal letter from the applicant addressed to the Embassy of Taiwan, explaining the purpose of the trip, dates of travel, cities to be visited, and place of accommodation.
  • Taiwan Visa : Application, Requirements. Apply for Taiwan Visas Online. 28 January 2010 1:57 UTC taiwan.visahq.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ ADMINISTRATION The authorities in Taipei exercise control over Taiwan, Kinmen, Matsu, Penghu (Pescadores) and several other smaller islands.
  • Taiwan (10/09) 28 January 2010 1:57 UTC www.state.gov [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ When you get your plane ticket, you'll want to arrive at Narita Airport, if you plan on spending most of your time in Tokyo.

.Fares are not too expensive, and local planes are very good.^ Japan does have a good health-care system, but it is expensive, and can be very stressful for foreigners.

.The domestic airport in Taipei is Song Shan Airport [16], which is in the north of the Taipei and easily reached by Taxi.^ The Grand Formosa Regent Hotel in Taipei is a 20 storeyed skyscraper.The Grand Formosa Regent Hotel in Taipei stands tall on the Chung Shan North Road.
  • Grand Formosa Regent Taipei, Taiwan 22 September 2009 21:10 UTC www.asiarooms.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ It just takes hardly 45 minutes to drive to the Chang Kai Shek International Airport from the Grand Formosa Regent Hotel in Taipei and just 15 minutes to drive to the Taipei Song Shan Airport.
  • Grand Formosa Regent Taipei, Taiwan 22 September 2009 21:10 UTC www.asiarooms.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.Domestic destinations include Kaohsiung, Tainan, Chiayi, Taichung, Pingtung, Taitung, Hualien, Makung (Penghu / Pescadores), Kinmen, Hengchun, Nangan and Beigan.^ ADMINISTRATION The authorities in Taipei exercise control over Taiwan, Kinmen, Matsu, Penghu (Pescadores) and several other smaller islands.
  • Taiwan (10/09) 28 January 2010 1:57 UTC www.state.gov [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Changhua, Chiayi [county], Hsinchu, Hualien, Kaohsiung [county], Kinmen, Lienchiang, Miaoli, Nantou, Penghu, Pingtung, Taichung, Tainan, Taipei [county], Taitung, Taoyuan, Yilan, and Yunlin municipalities: Chiayi [city], Hsinchu, Keelung, Taichung, Tainan special municipalities: Kaohsiung [city], Taipei [city] .
  • Taiwan (Republic of China) 28 January 2010 1:44 UTC www.my-world-guide.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Chiayi Taiwan Suao Taiwan Hsinchu Taiwan Taichung Taiwan Hualien Taiwan Tainan in Taiwan Jiufen Taiwan Taipei Taiwan Puli Taiwan Taiwan Tourist Attractions .
  • Taiwan Travel, Taiwan Travel Information, Taiwan Travel Guide 19 September 2009 13:27 UTC www.asiarooms.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.Travelers heading to Kenting can avail themselves of the direct and frequent bus service from Kaohsiung airport that connect with flights arriving from Taipei.^ There are also several domestic airports and domestic airlines that provide fast and convenient connecting flights between Taiwan's larger cities, as well as outlying islands.
  • 1996 Country Commercial Guides 19 September 2009 13:27 UTC dosfan.lib.uic.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

Navigation
.In mid-sized and smaller cities, your main reference point is going to be the train station.^ The point is, some of the smaller towns have better selections than the bigger cities do.

^ If your destination station is large (like Shinjuku,) getting out of the station may be as confusing as trying to find the train you want.

^ Lockers:     Many train and bus stations have pay lockers where you can store your bags if you want to walk around a city for a few days.

.If you're having trouble finding English speaking people, try looking for college or high school students.^ But if you're at a gaijin house, or an older apartment, you may find that there're too many people competing for the shower, or that there's no hot water during the winter.

^ Contact a big university, and they may be able to put you in contact with the school you want, or look in the Yellow Pages under language schools in case KEN School is listed there.

^ If so, you may find that the non-reserved cars are completely filled with people at the peak times.

Taiwan High Speed train
Taiwan High Speed train
Map of Taiwan High Speed Rail
Map of Taiwan High Speed Rail
.Taiwan's train system is excellent, with stops in all major cities.^ Police Boxes are located near most train stations, and at major intersections throughout the city.

^ Selling to the Taiwan authorities deserves a special mention as there are both excellent opportunities and major obstacles for U.S. firms interested in Taiwan authority procurement.
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^ The below phrases will not only get you to the correct train platform, but also the right store, the right city, or the right bus stop.

.Train stations are often located in the centers of most cities and towns and serve as a convenient hub for most types of transportation.^ However, the use of nares (like nostrils, located on the top of the head) to detect pheromones is probably the most important type of chemoreception in fishes.

.In addition, the train system allows you to bypass the highways, which can become extremely crowded on weekends and national holidays.^ On a crowded train, someone may feel you up.

^ Trains and subways are the easiest ways to get around, once you know the system.

.The new train backbone is Taiwan High Speed Rail (HSR, 高鐵 gāotiě) [17], a bullet train based on Japanese Shinkansen technology that covers the 345 km (215 mi) route on the West Coast from Taipei to Zuoying (Kaohsiung) in 90 min.^ Taiwan is divided into counties, provincial municipalities, and two special municipalities, Taipei and Kaohsiung.
  • Taiwan (10/09) 28 January 2010 1:57 UTC www.state.gov [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ The Shinkansen (bullet train owned by JR) is the fastest and most expensive, and is good for going from one end of the country to the other.

^ New technologies and tools also demand improved training and dissemination methods in China.
  • MILITARY CAPABILITIES OF THE PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF CHINA 28 January 2010 1:44 UTC commdocs.house.gov [Source type: Original source]

.Other stops on the route are Banqiao, Taoyuan, Hsinchu, Taichung, Chiayi and Tainan, but note that many THSR stations have been built a fair distance from the cities they serve (e.g.^ Lockers:     Many train and bus stations have pay lockers where you can store your bags if you want to walk around a city for a few days.

^ It would be like trying to imagine history of Athens, Rome, Alexandria and other great cities of antiquity if they were destroyed at the height of their golden age.
  • MILITARY CAPABILITIES OF THE PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF CHINA 28 January 2010 1:44 UTC commdocs.house.gov [Source type: Original source]

^ Changhua, Chiayi [county], Hsinchu, Hualien, Kaohsiung [county], Kinmen, Lienchiang, Miaoli, Nantou, Penghu, Pingtung, Taichung, Tainan, Taipei [county], Taitung, Taoyuan, Yilan, and Yunlin municipalities: Chiayi [city], Hsinchu, Keelung, Taichung, Tainan special municipalities: Kaohsiung [city], Taipei [city] .
  • Taiwan (Republic of China) 28 January 2010 1:44 UTC www.my-world-guide.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

a taxi from downtown Tainan costs up to NT$400, but there's a free shuttle bus). .A one way ticket from Taipei to Kaohsiung costs NT$1,490 in economy or NT$2,440 in business class, but economy seats have plush seats and ample legroom, so there's little reason to pay extra.^ Most western airlines bury this tax in the cost of the ticket, so you don't know that you're actually paying it.

^ You can ride from one end of the line to the other, and back for the price of the cheapest ticket on the line (as long as you don't leave the train and exit one of the stations along the way.

^ Warrants or summons were required by law except when there was ample reason to believe the suspect may flee, or when circumstances were too urgent to apply for a summons prior to questioning.
  • Taiwan 28 January 2010 1:57 UTC www.state.gov [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

All signage and announcements are in English as well, making navigation a snap. .Bookings are accepted online and via phone up to two weeks in advance at +886-2-6626-8000 (English spoken), with payment required only when you pick up the tickets.^ Landlords frequently require deposits of up to two months' rent, and tenants are usually responsible for utilities.
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^ The hostel in Tokyo is always booked weeks in advance, because it is central to where the action is.

^ Do not confuse this form with the in-flight catalog mail-order form that will be handed out to Japanese residents -- it is easy to get the two mixed up if you are not familiar with the procedure.

.Credit cards are accepted.^ Japan is a cash-based society, which means that checks are not used very much, and international credit cards are accepted mainly by hotels and restaurants.

^ In addition, internationally-recognized credit cards are accepted in many hotels, restaurants, and shops.
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.Mainline trains are run by the separate Taiwan Railway Administration (TRA, 台鐵) [18], whose services are generally efficient and reliable.^ C. Communications In general, Taiwan's telecommunications systems are efficient and convenient.
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^ The Taiwan Railway Administration operates an extensive rail network that is more than 1,000 kilometers in length.
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.Reserving tickets well in advance is recommended when traveling with the train on weekends, especially for long distance travel.^ So, if you can, reserve a seat via the JR window at the train station, a few days in advance.

^ You can ride from one end of the line to the other, and back for the price of the cheapest ticket on the line (as long as you don't leave the train and exit one of the stations along the way.

^ Otherwise, try to get your travel agent to book your hotel in advance (which saves you the long-distance phone bill if you do it yourself.

.Slower (but more frequent) commuter trains without reserved seating are also available.^ When the number of seats to be allotted to each political party under Item 1 of Paragraphs 1 and 2 is not fewer than five and not more than ten, one seat shall be reserved for a female delegate.
  • East Asian Studies Documents: Constitution of the Republic of China, 1947 28 January 2010 1:44 UTC www.isop.ucla.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ So, if you can, reserve a seat via the JR window at the train station, a few days in advance.

^ For several years, Deloitte has made available, in the public interest and without charge, its English language IFRS e-learning training materials.
  • IAS Plus - Jurisdictional Updates - China 28 January 2010 1:44 UTC www.iasplus.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.Train timetables and online booking [19] (up to 2 weeks in advance) are available on the TRA website; however, the online services only work between 8AM and 9PM or thereabouts and there is a small charge, $7, for online bookings.^ The hostel in Tokyo is always booked weeks in advance, because it is central to where the action is.

^ The second is a reading library that contains books on sake and wine production all around the world, and there's a computerized look-up system too (only in Japanese though.

^ Applicants with advanced degrees may qualify for National Defense Service, consisting of reserve officer training followed by four years of work in a government or academic research institution.
  • Taiwan (10/09) 28 January 2010 1:57 UTC www.state.gov [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.Note that booking online only establishes a reservation as there is no Internet payment option.^ Not only is there no expectation that this child will learn to read and write Taiwanese, at the present moment in history it is virtually impossible for this child to read and write Taiwanese because there are no accepted norms for writing in that language.
  • Taiwanese, Mandarin, and Taiwan's language situation 11 September 2009 12:18 UTC www.pinyin.info [Source type: Original source]

^ There were generally no official restrictions on access to the Internet and individuals and groups could engage in peaceful expression of views via the Internet, including by email.
  • Taiwan 28 January 2010 1:57 UTC www.state.gov [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.You must pay for the tickets you reserved at your local train station or post office to actually receive it.^ When you have your ticket, go to the ticket gates.

^ If you buy the cheapest ticket you can, you can pay the difference when you exit the train station.

^ You do not want to lose your ticket.

.Children under 115 cm (45 in) height go free, and taller kids shorter than 145 cm (57 in) and under 12 years of age get half-price tickets.^ The minimum wage is adjusted in August every year, based on the inflation rate (measured by the Consumer Price Index) plus half of the increase in labor productivity.
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^ Stalin allowed Chiang Ching-kuo to return to China with his Russian wife and two children in April 1937 after living in Russia for 12 years.
  • Exploring Chinese History :: Database Catalog :: Biographical Database :: Republic of China (Taiwan)- (1949- Present) 28 January 2010 1:44 UTC www.ibiblio.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Midsummer, and the second half of December are heavy tourist seasons, which means that getting plane tickets for those times will be more difficult and the prices will be higher than for other dates in the year.

If you get return tickets there is a small discount depending upon travel distance. .There are also vending machines at the larger stations.^ There are a variety of vending machines every 50 feet or so, but most sell only soda and cigarettes.

^ There are three kinds of ticket vending machines: Fixed denomination: This machine only sells one value of ticket.

.Round island tourist rail passes are also available which allow the holder to embark and disembark a set number of times for a fixed price are also available at most larger train stations.^ If you want to do any travelling by train, consider buying a Japan Rail Pass.

^ A note on Tokyo trains:     Most train lines radiate out from Tokyo station.

^ Make sure that you have some tissues for those times when you need to use a public toilet (as in the train stations) because there won't be any toilet paper.

A foreign passport may be required for purchase.
Service
Aside from THSR, the fastest train is Tzu-Chiang, and the slowest is Pingkuai (Ordinary/Express). .There is often little to choose between prices and destination times for adjacent train classes, but the gap can be quite large between the fastest and the slowest.^ There was often conflict between the philosophies, such as the individualistic Song Dynasty neo-Confucians, who believed Legalism departed from the original spirit of Confucianism.
  • People's Republic of China - a knol by Per- Jonas Xia Mehus 28 January 2010 1:44 UTC knol.google.com [Source type: News]

^ Continued renovations to the former Soviet Kuznetsov-class aircraft carrier suggest China may choose to use the platform for training purposes.
  • Military Power Report of People's Republic of China 2008 28 January 2010 1:44 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ If you need to switch trains a couple of times to get to your destination, don't panic.

.
  • Tzu-Chiang (自強 ziqiang): The fastest (and most expensive).^ The Shinkansen (bullet train owned by JR) is the fastest and most expensive, and is good for going from one end of the country to the other.

    Assigned seating. Non-reserved (standing) tickets are also sold at full price.
  • Chu-Kuang (莒光 juguang): Second fastest. Assigned seating.
  • Fu-hsing (復興 fuxing): Third fastest. Assigned seating. .Non-reserved tickets are sold at 80% of original price.
  • EMU (Electric multiple unit, 電車 dianche) and DRC (Diesel railcar / 柴客): Short to medium distance commuter train, stops at all stations.^ So, if you can, reserve a seat via the JR window at the train station, a few days in advance.

    ^ Express trains are like locals, except that they only stop at certain stations along the line.

    ^ You can ride from one end of the line to the other, and back for the price of the cheapest ticket on the line (as long as you don't leave the train and exit one of the stations along the way.

    .No assigned seating.
  • Express / Ordinary (普通 putong): Stops at all stations, no air conditioning, most inexpensive.^ Express trains are like locals, except that they only stop at certain stations along the line.

    No assigned seating. .Some Express trains (the light blue ones running on West Trunk Line) are air-conditioned while others (dark blue ones) are not equipped with air conditioners.
  • Diesel Express: Only available on East Trunk Line and South Link Line.^ The Shinkansen (bullet train owned by JR) is the fastest and most expensive, and is good for going from one end of the country to the other.

    ^ Single-line, multiple denomination: These machines sell a variety of ticket values, and some of them accept train cards (see the section on Phone and Train Cards.

    ^ But to put it in a few words, not only with regard to Taiwan but more broadly, the purpose of Chinese military power is turning slowly away from inland concerns to its north, south, and west, to mission requirements to its east and southeast.
    • MILITARY CAPABILITIES OF THE PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF CHINA 28 January 2010 1:44 UTC commdocs.house.gov [Source type: Original source]

    Mainly serve as commuter trains. No air conditioning. Tickets are the same price as Express and Ordinary.
.For travel to nearby cities, you can travel on electric dianche (電車) commuter trains .^ The below phrases will not only get you to the correct train platform, but also the right store, the right city, or the right bus stop.

^ Train cards are good if you do a lot of travelling on a particular train line, and can be purchased at nearly any station connected to the specific train line you want.

^ If you want to do any travelling by train, consider buying a Japan Rail Pass.

These arrive very frequently (about once every ten to fifteen minutes). .In addition, "standing tickets" may be purchased on trains with assigned seating that have no available seats.^ Train cards are very similar to phone cards, except that they're a little smaller, and are used only for purchasing train tickets.

^ This book is not available for downloading on the CASC website but may be purchased in bookstores in China.
  • IAS Plus - Jurisdictional Updates - China 28 January 2010 1:44 UTC www.iasplus.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ No deputy to the National People's Congress may be arrested or placed on criminal trial without the consent of the Presidium of the current session of the National People's Congress or, when the National People's Congress is not in session, without the consent of its Standing Committee.
  • Constitution of the People's Republic of China - The U.S. Constitution Online - USConstitution.net 28 January 2010 1:44 UTC www.usconstitution.net [Source type: Original source]

Standing tickets are 80% the original ticket price and may be useful for last minute travelers. .The downside is, of course, that you will be required to stand during your entire trip.^ If you can read kanji, this map will tell you how much your trip will cost.

^ You need to contact your local consulate to get the paperwork for this visa, and to determine the requirements for receiving it.

^ And most places will let you store your big bags there while you go on a short trip for a few days (if you want to travel light at that time.

.Also, do try to get your destination station written in Chinese and try to do some "mix and match" with the system map as well as looking out for the matching Chinese characters written on the station.^ You should have your destination written down on paper, at least in Hiragana, and ask your driver (preferably, in Japanese) to tell you when you have reached where you are going.

^ The Chinese people must fight against those forces and elements, both at home and abroad, that are hostile to China's socialist system and try to undermine it.
  • CONSTITUTION OF THE PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF CHINA 28 January 2010 1:44 UTC english.people.com.cn [Source type: Original source]
  • Constitution of the People's Republic of China - The U.S. Constitution Online - USConstitution.net 28 January 2010 1:44 UTC www.usconstitution.net [Source type: Original source]
  • Selected Legal Provisions of the People's Republic of China Affecting Criminal Justice 28 January 2010 1:44 UTC www.cecc.gov [Source type: Original source]

^ This will help you read the signs, and will let some kind Japanese person figure out where you are trying to go.

.Unfortunately for foreigners, announcements are only made in Mandarin, Taiwanese and Hakka so English would not be of much help in the train.^ (Lin 1990) In 2003, bilingual education in Taiwan is more likely to signify instruction in English and Mandarin or Taiwanese.
  • Taiwanese, Mandarin, and Taiwan's language situation 11 September 2009 12:18 UTC www.pinyin.info [Source type: Original source]

^ (McArthur 2002: 357) In 1990, bilingual education ( shuāngyǔ jiàoyù 雙語教育) in Taiwan signified instruction in Mandarin and Taiwanese or Hakka.
  • Taiwanese, Mandarin, and Taiwan's language situation 11 September 2009 12:18 UTC www.pinyin.info [Source type: Original source]

^ Sapporo International Communication Plaza, Sapporo, Hokkaido (3rd floor)     phone: 011-211-2105     Much more professional, and aimed more at helping out foreigners.

.Therefore, be alert and always be on the lookout for your destination station, or you risk missing it.^ When you get to your destination, go to the ticket gates.

^ You should have your destination written down on paper, at least in Hiragana, and ask your driver (preferably, in Japanese) to tell you when you have reached where you are going.

^ So, if you can, have your train line, and destination written down on paper in Hiragana and kanji.

By bus

Intercity buses are called keyun, as opposed to gongche which run within the county and city. .Buses run by private companies are generally more luxurious (often boasting wide, soft seats, foot-rests and individual video screens) than those run by government-owned companies.^ While a five-day workweek has been mandated for the public sector, according to a CLA survey, more than half of private sector enterprises also reduced the normal workweek to five days.
  • Taiwan 28 January 2010 1:57 UTC www.state.gov [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ More than 80 percent of the U.S.- made process control systems sold in Taiwan go to state-run firms and large-scale private enterprises.
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^ All revenues accruing to the national autonomous areas under the financial system of the state shall be managed and used by the organs of self-government of those areas on their own.
  • Constitution of the People's Republic of China - The U.S. Constitution Online - USConstitution.net 28 January 2010 1:44 UTC www.usconstitution.net [Source type: Original source]

.Still, even the government-owned buses are comfortable, punctual, and maintain clean facilities on board.^ Even the government cannot institute a workable scheme because its own advisers have different views on how to cope with the dilemma.
  • Taiwanese, Mandarin, and Taiwan's language situation 11 September 2009 12:18 UTC www.pinyin.info [Source type: Original source]

Bus stop in Taipei
.
Bus stop in Taipei
In major cities, bus transportation is extensive.
^ For travel within Taipei and various other major cities, taxi drivers are obliged to use the meter to calculate the fare.
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^ The below phrases will not only get you to the correct train platform, but also the right store, the right city, or the right bus stop.

^ Bus services in major cities are quite extensive, but can be incomprehensible to the foreign visitor.
  • 1996 Country Commercial Guides 19 September 2009 13:27 UTC dosfan.lib.uic.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.Route maps, however, are almost entirely in Chinese, though the destinations indicated on the front of buses are in English.^ I have collected several English phrasebooks written entirely in Chinese characters that date from the late Qing period to the late twentieth century.
  • Taiwanese, Mandarin, and Taiwan's language situation 11 September 2009 12:18 UTC www.pinyin.info [Source type: Original source]

^ However, in the Chinese world, almost nobody uses the Mandarin version Sun Yixian, nor the Cantonese version Sun Yat-sen.
  • Exploring Chinese History :: Database Catalog :: Biographical Database :: Republic of China (Taiwan)- (1949- Present) 28 January 2010 1:44 UTC www.ibiblio.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.If you're staying at a hotel, have the clerk suggest some routes for you, and circle your destination on the map.^ You should have your destination written down on paper, at least in Hiragana, and ask your driver (preferably, in Japanese) to tell you when you have reached where you are going.

^ If you need to switch trains a couple of times to get to your destination, don't panic.

^ If you can find a place to stay, then all you need are some good maps, the Walking Guide to Tokyo from one of the FTP sites, and some spending money.

.Show this to the bus driver, and he/she will hopefully remember to tell you when to get off.^ You should have your destination written down on paper, at least in Hiragana, and ask your driver (preferably, in Japanese) to tell you when you have reached where you are going.

^ However: You pay for the bus just before you get off.

.In smaller cities, there is often no local bus service, though the out-of-town buses will sometimes make stops in the suburbs.^ There are, for example, no requirements that firms transfer technology, locate in a specified location, or hire a certain number of local employees in exchange for permission to invest.
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^ Another hint: In Himeji, a smaller tourist town between Kyoto and Hiroshima, there's a really nice little manga store that has the entire collections of Orange Road , City Hunter , and Pat Labor .

^ Bus services in major cities are quite extensive, but can be incomprehensible to the foreign visitor.
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.There are taxi ranks at all airports and bus terminals.^ To get there, take the bus from the airport in to Seoul.

^ G. Food Chinese cuisine ranks among the best in the world, and there is no better place to sample it in all its infinite variety than in Taiwan.
  • 1996 Country Commercial Guides 19 September 2009 13:27 UTC dosfan.lib.uic.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

Occasionally a bus driver might stop a bus away from the curb at a bus stop. Sometimes it is due to a vehicle illegally parked at a bus stop. .(Taiwanese traffic law and regulation prohibit vehicles from stopping or parking within 10 m (33 ft) of a bus stop.^ The law prohibits teachings, writings, or research that advocate communism or communist united front organizations, which endanger the public order or good morals, or violate regulations or laws.
  • Taiwan 28 January 2010 1:57 UTC www.state.gov [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ The ministries and commissions issues orders, directives and regulations within the jurisdiction of their respective departments in accordance with the law and the administrative rules and regulations, decisions and orders issued by the State Council.
  • Constitution of the People's Republic of China - The U.S. Constitution Online - USConstitution.net 28 January 2010 1:44 UTC www.usconstitution.net [Source type: Original source]

^ Within the limits of their authority as prescribed by law, they adopt and issue regulations and examine and decide on plans for local economic and cultural development and for the development of public services.
  • Constitution of the People's Republic of China - The U.S. Constitution Online - USConstitution.net 28 January 2010 1:44 UTC www.usconstitution.net [Source type: Original source]

) .However, a bus driver might stop a bus away from the curb just because he or she does not want to wait for overtaking traffic while leaving a bus stop.^ Page 22 PREV PAGE TOP OF DOC     So I believe that they are wary of this and will—just because they are wary of us does not mean that it is less of a threat to us.
  • MILITARY CAPABILITIES OF THE PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF CHINA 28 January 2010 1:44 UTC commdocs.house.gov [Source type: Original source]

^ However: You pay for the bus just before you get off.

^ Of course, what you really want is one of the big bookstores, like Kinokuniya, that carry just about everything, because they will have the widest selection of manga.

.Therefore, be much more careful when getting on or off a bus stopped away from a curb, as many motorcycles, motor scooters, and bicycles will definitely be tempted to overtake on the right side of the stopped bus where people get on and off!^ It's used more as an insult, and will turn people off of you.

^ If nothing else you'll notice that you're getting dirty looks from people if you so much as carry an empty pop can as you walk along.

^ Seoul is a much more relaxed version of Tokyo, and the people of most outlying cities have never seen foreigners.

(As traffic drives on the right side of the road in Taiwan, buses have doors on the right side.)
.In Taiwan you need to hail the bus you want as you see it coming - much like hailing a taxi.^ These would most likely be Taiwan, Japan, Vietnam, and the Philippines, where its chance of prevailing militarily are much better.
  • MILITARY CAPABILITIES OF THE PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF CHINA 28 January 2010 1:44 UTC commdocs.house.gov [Source type: Original source]

^ Clearly, they cannot come out against reunification because it has implications for Taiwan; but nonetheless, they are worried about what a unified Korea—reunified Korea would be like.
  • MILITARY CAPABILITIES OF THE PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF CHINA 28 January 2010 1:44 UTC commdocs.house.gov [Source type: Original source]

^ They see that the Russians are making too much money selling weapons to the PRC and they would like to do the same.
  • MILITARY CAPABILITIES OF THE PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF CHINA 28 January 2010 1:44 UTC commdocs.house.gov [Source type: Original source]

.Both end points of the route are listed on the front of the bus in Chinese and sometimes English, so it is important to make sure the bus you get on is going the right direction.^ If you plan on staying for one month or more, make sure that all medical and health concerns are addressed before you leave (ie.

^ There is still money to be made as an English teacher, but you're really going to have to hustle to find it.

^ And if you wear glasses or contacts, make sure that you bring a spare pair, and/or your prescription.

.In Taipei, you sometimes pay getting on the bus and sometimes getting off (whether with cash or the ubiquitous Easy Card).^ However: You pay for the bus just before you get off.

^ Assuming that you plan on staying for a few months, you should consider getting business cards printed with your address in Japan, both in English and Japanese.

^ Lockers:     Many train and bus stations have pay lockers where you can store your bags if you want to walk around a city for a few days.

.As you get into the bus there will be an illuminated sign opposite you.^ There will be a Marui (OIOI) store on the opposite corner, depending on which end of the station you exited.

^ A couple of buildings later, there's a doorway with the sign on the opposite side.

^ Is there any parallel that causes you to think that China would enter into adventurism a la the scenarios with Japan, Taiwan and the Philippines and their military orientation?
  • MILITARY CAPABILITIES OF THE PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF CHINA 28 January 2010 1:44 UTC commdocs.house.gov [Source type: Original source]

.If the first character is 上 pay as you get in, if it is 下 pay as you get out (or just watch the other people).^ To avoid paying for train fare, they will walk through the ticket gate of the fare adjustment window in the middle of the crush of other people that walk by flashing their pass cards.

^ Narita airport is quite a ways out from Tokyo, and Tokyo itself can be pretty confusing when you first enter it.

^ If you have a tattoo, be warned that some sentos have a restriction against people with tattoos, as a method intended for keeping Yakusa members out.

Taipei MRT
Taipei MRT
.Taipei has an excellent, fairly comprehensive subway system called the MRT that makes traveling around the city a snap, and Kaohsiung's metro finally opened in March 2008. Prepaid travel cards such as the Easy Card in Taipei for bus and metro travel are available at metro stations.^ The democratization process continued with the first direct elections of the Mayors of Taiwan's two largest cities (Taipei and Kaohsiung) and the Governor of Taiwan Province in December 1994.
  • 1996 Country Commercial Guides 19 September 2009 13:27 UTC dosfan.lib.uic.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Make sure that you have the toll-free information phone number for your card company -- to find the nearest office to you, just call that phone number.

^ Lockers:     Many train and bus stations have pay lockers where you can store your bags if you want to walk around a city for a few days.

.Easy Cards are read via proximity sensors so you do not need to remove the card from your wallet or purse.^ Your home country bank may tell you that you can use your ATM card at ATMachines in Japan.

^ Assuming that you plan on staying for a few months, you should consider getting business cards printed with your address in Japan, both in English and Japanese.

^ You need to contact your local consulate to get the paperwork for this visa, and to determine the requirements for receiving it.

.The MRT is very clean as there is no eating, drinking, or smoking inside of the stations or subway trains.^ Subways:     Now, Tokyo's subways are very much like the train lines, and the ticket machines work the same.

^ Make sure that you have some tissues for those times when you need to use a public toilet (as in the train stations) because there won't be any toilet paper.

^ By looking at the train map, you'll see that there is no station marked "Ginza."

.There is also a special waiting area that is monitored by security camera for those who are concerned about security late at night.^ There is no—if there are indeed Chinese analysts who are suggesting that we would be too concerned about our trade in order to defend Taiwan, they are very, very sadly mistaken.
  • MILITARY CAPABILITIES OF THE PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF CHINA 28 January 2010 1:44 UTC commdocs.house.gov [Source type: Original source]

^ The state helps the national autonomous areas train large numbers of cadres at different levels and specialized personnel and skilled workers of different professions and trades from among the nationality or nationalities in those areas.
  • CONSTITUTION OF THE PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF CHINA 28 January 2010 1:44 UTC english.people.com.cn [Source type: Original source]
  • Selected Legal Provisions of the People's Republic of China Affecting Criminal Justice 28 January 2010 1:44 UTC www.cecc.gov [Source type: Original source]

Betel nut beauties
.The highways of Taiwan are lined with brightly lit booths staffed by attractive, skimpily dressed girls, but they're not plying the world's oldest trade; instead, they're betel nut beauties, who compete for the attention of customers to sell the mildly addictive stimulant betel nut (檳榔 bīnláng), not themselves.^ Taiwan has been able to join the Asia-Pacific Cooperation (APEC) dialogue as on "economy" and is applying to join the World Trade Organization (WTO) as a "customs territory."
  • 1996 Country Commercial Guides 19 September 2009 13:27 UTC dosfan.lib.uic.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Under this ideology, Taiwan was seen as a place for mainlanders to resent as they waited for the re-conquest of the Maoist mainland.
  • Exploring Chinese History :: Database Catalog :: Biographical Database :: Republic of China (Taiwan)- (1949- Present) 28 January 2010 1:44 UTC www.ibiblio.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Beginning about 18 months ago, the Taiwan authorities accelerated the pace of reform in order to pave the way to accede to the World Trade Organization (WTO).
  • 1996 Country Commercial Guides 19 September 2009 13:27 UTC dosfan.lib.uic.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.The trade has prompted much moral hand-wringing and sale by scantily clad girls is banned in Taipei and a handful of other counties - mostly out of fears of a negative international reputation or more practically the fear of traffic accidents and congestion from rubber-necking.^ On the other hand, office drinking parties, where everyone from the department goes out together, are also common.

^ They—there is no one more painfully aware of the gap between Chinese mission requirements on the one hand and its desired capabilities on the other than the Chinese themselves.
  • MILITARY CAPABILITIES OF THE PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF CHINA 28 January 2010 1:44 UTC commdocs.house.gov [Source type: Original source]

^ Sapporo International Communication Plaza, Sapporo, Hokkaido (3rd floor)     phone: 011-211-2105     Much more professional, and aimed more at helping out foreigners.

Nonetheless, the practice is still going strong in much of the country, and Binlang is available everywhere from small roadside shops and stalls. Binlang itself is worth a try and there is a chance you will be offered it in the company of farmers or working-class Taiwanese. Be warned - it stains your teeth blood red. To consume it, bite and spit off the cap at the top of the nut, then chew the rest of the bundle. Spit frequently and enjoy the buzz. .One sampling on your trip shouldn't be a problem, but do keep in mind that this little treat is habit-forming and cancer-causing for long-term "users."^ Keep in mind, too, that the airport will be pure chaos during those days, and give yourself lots of time for waiting in long lines.

^ If your electronics have a power cord, keep in mind that some parts of Japan are 110vac - 60Hz, and other parts are not.

^ If you can hold your own and have plenty of cash, consider going to one of the more popular bars, and keep your ears open.

.Taxis are a dime a dozen in major Taiwanese cities.^ For travel within Taipei and various other major cities, taxi drivers are obliged to use the meter to calculate the fare.
  • 1996 Country Commercial Guides 19 September 2009 13:27 UTC dosfan.lib.uic.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.You don't need to look for a taxi - they'll be looking for you.^ Page 53 PREV PAGE TOP OF DOC     So what I am suggesting is that they don't need a computer-controlled system such as we are putting in place today.
  • MILITARY CAPABILITIES OF THE PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF CHINA 28 January 2010 1:44 UTC commdocs.house.gov [Source type: Original source]

^ They need to keep their industry going too, and I don't think that we need to look for deep reasons.
  • MILITARY CAPABILITIES OF THE PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF CHINA 28 January 2010 1:44 UTC commdocs.house.gov [Source type: Original source]

^ Contact a big university, and they may be able to put you in contact with the school you want, or look in the Yellow Pages under language schools in case KEN School is listed there.

The standard yellow cabs scour roads looking for potential riders such as lost foreigners. It is possible but generally unnecessary to phone for a taxi. .To hail one, simply place your hand in front of you parallel to the ground.^ And most places will let you store your big bags there while you go on a short trip for a few days (if you want to travel light at that time.

^ And, many places do not have towels for drying your hands when you wash them -- your handkerchief is supposed to be for wiping your face and hands, not blowing your nose.

^ If you want to meet some Japanese (and practice your language lessons on them), and any number of foreign English teachers, conversation houses are the places to be.

.But they'll often stop for you even if you're just waiting to cross the street or for a bus.^ That's where you are expected to put your money, and that's where they'll put your change.

^ And if you're looking for a particular address, you'll notice that the buildings aren't numbered sequentially (rather, it's in the order that they were constructed on that street.

^ When someone answers you, they'll probably speak too fast for you to follow them, even if you do know a little Japanese.

In less heavily trafficked areas further out from the transit hubs, taxis are always available by calling taxi dispatch centers.
.Drivers generally cannot converse in English or read Westernized addresses (except for special Taoyuan airport taxis).^ Since most taxi drivers cannot speak English, the visitor should always carry Chinese-language versions of both his hotel namecard and desired destination.
  • 1996 Country Commercial Guides 19 September 2009 13:27 UTC dosfan.lib.uic.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.Have the hotel desk or a Taiwanese friend write out your destination in Chinese, and also take a business card from the hotel.^ Assuming that you plan on staying for a few months, you should consider getting business cards printed with your address in Japan, both in English and Japanese.

^ The more experienced hitchers have a large notebook and black magic marker, for writing out their destinations both in hiragana and kanji (or maybe romanji and kanji.

^ You can convert your checks to cash at the hotel front desk for free once in the country.

.Show the driver the Chinese writing of where you are going.^ You should have your destination written down on paper, at least in Hiragana, and ask your driver (preferably, in Japanese) to tell you when you have reached where you are going.

.Taxis are visibly metered, and cab drivers are strictly forbidden from taking tips.^ For travel within Taipei and various other major cities, taxi drivers are obliged to use the meter to calculate the fare.
  • 1996 Country Commercial Guides 19 September 2009 13:27 UTC dosfan.lib.uic.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.A maximum of four people can ride in one cab, and for the price of one.^ Journalists from Xinhua News Agency and People's Daily were permitted to visit Taiwan but were not granted the maximum one-month stay.
  • Taiwan 28 January 2010 1:57 UTC www.state.gov [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ You can ride from one end of the line to the other, and back for the price of the cheapest ticket on the line (as long as you don't leave the train and exit one of the stations along the way.

Relative to American taxicabs, Taiwanese cabs are inexpensive.
.Although taxi drivers in Taiwan tend to be more honest than in many other countries, not all are trustworthy.^ The relationship between China, the United States, and other countries is complicated, and the debate about China and Taiwan is reemerging in our Country.
  • MILITARY CAPABILITIES OF THE PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF CHINA 28 January 2010 1:44 UTC commdocs.house.gov [Source type: Original source]

^ Now, there are more people looking for all kinds of jobs than there are open positions.

^ More than 80 percent of the U.S.- made process control systems sold in Taiwan go to state-run firms and large-scale private enterprises.
  • 1996 Country Commercial Guides 19 September 2009 13:27 UTC dosfan.lib.uic.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.An indirect trip might cost you half again as much.^ If you can read kanji, this map will tell you how much your trip will cost.

.A cab driver using night-time rates during the daytime will cost you 30% more (make sure he presses the large button on the left on his meter before 11PM).^ If you can, get as much sleep as possible during the "night" hours.

^ The cost is a little higher than for a business hotel, and is a great way to spend the night even if you sleep alone.

^ This is a great way to meet people, and possibly make friends, if you are on a real tight budget, or have lots of time for travelling.

.Avoid the especially overzealous drivers who congregate at the exits of train stations.^ You can ride from one end of the line to the other, and back for the price of the cheapest ticket on the line (as long as you don't leave the train and exit one of the stations along the way.

^ If you buy the cheapest ticket you can, you can pay the difference when you exit the train station.

.Also, stand your ground and insist on paying meter price only if any driving on mountain roads is involved - some drivers like to tack on surcharges or use night-time rates if driving to places like Wenshan or Wulai.^ This stands in sharp contrast to Chiang Kai-shek, whose pictures were mostly removed from public places in the 1990s, and whose likeness has gradually disappeared from coinage and currency.
  • Exploring Chinese History :: Database Catalog :: Biographical Database :: Republic of China (Taiwan)- (1949- Present) 28 January 2010 1:44 UTC www.ibiblio.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Phone Cards:     Phone cards are used in many pay phones, just like money.

^ The rates differ from place to place, and room to room, but you can rent a room for one hour or for the night.

Such attempts to cheat are against the law.
.From Taoyuan Airport (TPE), buses are a much more economical option but if you want a direct route Taoyuan airport drivers are the best choice.^ When you get your plane ticket, you'll want to arrive at Narita Airport, if you plan on spending most of your time in Tokyo.

^ The rules state that you have to study pretty much full-time, and can not work more that 20 hours a week.

^ Otherwise, when you change lines, you need to hand in your first ticket, follow the signs directing you to the train line you want, and the buy a second ticket.

.They're quite comfortable and get you to your destination as quick as possible.^ You're going to want to be as alert as possible when you arrive at the airport.

^ Again, you're best bet is to find a company in your home country that has a Japanese branch, and get posted that way.

^ It may be the case that countries you pass through en route to your destination may require a separate transit visa.
  • Taiwan Visa : Application, Requirements. Apply for Taiwan Visas Online. 28 January 2010 1:57 UTC taiwan.visahq.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.All the TPE taxi drivers are interlinked by radio so they could be forewarned if there are police.^ While there are Police Department buidings as we know them in the west, they're less common, and hard to find.

Sometimes, if there are traffic jams and no police around, the driver will drive in the emergency lane. .Taxis from TPE to destinations in Tao Yuan, parts of Taipei county and some other destinations are 'allowed' to add an additional 50% to the meter fare.^ For travel within Taipei and various other major cities, taxi drivers are obliged to use the meter to calculate the fare.
  • 1996 Country Commercial Guides 19 September 2009 13:27 UTC dosfan.lib.uic.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ In the people's congress of an autonomous region, prefecture or county, in addition to the deputies of the nationality exercising regional autonomy in the administrative area, the other nationalities inhabiting the area are also entitled to appropriate representation.
  • Constitution of the People's Republic of China - The U.S. Constitution Online - USConstitution.net 28 January 2010 1:44 UTC www.usconstitution.net [Source type: Original source]

^ In the people's congress of an autonomous region , prefecture or county, in addition to the deputies of the nationality or nationalities exercising regional autonomy in the administrative area, the other nationalities inhabiting the area are also entitled to appropriate representation.
  • CONSTITUTION OF THE PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF CHINA 28 January 2010 1:44 UTC english.people.com.cn [Source type: Original source]

The badge and taxi driver identification are displayed inside and the license number marked on the outside. .You must also be wary that the driver turns on his meter, otherwise he might rip you off - in such a case, you aren't obliged to pay; but make sure you can find a police officer to settle the matter.^ It's used more as an insult, and will turn people off of you.

^ If you have a train map, each of the lines will be color-coded, with a color chart at the bottom listing the names of the lines (make sure that you have an English version of the map.

^ There aren't many bargains left to be found here, and if you want inexpensive electronics or clothing, you're better off visiting Taiwan or Korea.

.If there are stories of passengers boarding fake taxis and being attacked by the driver, it is best not to be paranoid about it.^ It is not necessary to tip in taxis unless assistance with luggage is rendered, but most drivers do appreciate being allowed to keep small change.
  • 1996 Country Commercial Guides 19 September 2009 13:27 UTC dosfan.lib.uic.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ There is in the testimony various military scenarios that the PLA is arguing about which would be best.
  • MILITARY CAPABILITIES OF THE PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF CHINA 28 January 2010 1:44 UTC commdocs.house.gov [Source type: Original source]

Drivers may be more worried about passengers attacking them!
.If you do call a taxi dispatch center, you will be given a taxi number to identify the vehicle when it arrives.^ Make sure that you have the toll-free information phone number for your card company -- to find the nearest office to you, just call that phone number.

^ When you first arrive in Japan, you'll probably want to call your hotel or hostel to confirm your reservations or to simply find a place to stay.

^ You can find out how to join the IYHN by calling a travel agency, and asking for the phone number of the hostel office nearest to you.

.Generally, dispatch is extremely rapid and efficient, as the taxis are constantly monitoring dispatch calls from the headquarters using radio while they are on the move.^ In the meantime, they used so-called "milk names" (乳名) which were given to the infant shortly after his birth, and which were known only by the close family.
  • Exploring Chinese History :: Database Catalog :: Biographical Database :: Republic of China (Taiwan)- (1949- Present) 28 January 2010 1:44 UTC www.ibiblio.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ As the courtesy name is the name used by people of the same generation to call the person, Chiang Kai-shek soon became known under this new name.
  • Exploring Chinese History :: Database Catalog :: Biographical Database :: Republic of China (Taiwan)- (1949- Present) 28 January 2010 1:44 UTC www.ibiblio.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

This is also the safest way to take a taxi, especially for females.
.Taxis are also a flexible although relatively expensive way to travel to nearby cities.^ For travel within Taipei and various other major cities, taxi drivers are obliged to use the meter to calculate the fare.
  • 1996 Country Commercial Guides 19 September 2009 13:27 UTC dosfan.lib.uic.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.They have the advantage over the electric trains in that they run very late at night.^ Train cards are very similar to phone cards, except that they're a little smaller, and are used only for purchasing train tickets.

.Drivers are required to provide a receipt if asked, though you might find them unwilling to do so.^ These services can help you find an apartment, as well as providing job listings, fax and typewriter services, and message boards.

^ You should have your destination written down on paper, at least in Hiragana, and ask your driver (preferably, in Japanese) to tell you when you have reached where you are going.

^ If you are lost, or have an address for a place that you can't find, look for the nearest police box and ask for help.

Taxis, as elsewhere in Asia, are not keen on exchanging large bills. .Try to keep some smaller denomination bills on hand to avoid the hassle of fighting with the driver for change.^ It is not necessary to tip in taxis unless assistance with luggage is rendered, but most drivers do appreciate being allowed to keep small change.
  • 1996 Country Commercial Guides 19 September 2009 13:27 UTC dosfan.lib.uic.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ If you want a second-hand bicycle or VCR, trying visiting the backsides of apartment complexes some night.

.Taxi drivers are known for their strong political opinions as many spend all day listening to Taiwanese talk radio.^ Many old-fashioned scholars are of the opinion that they can solve the problem of sinographless vernacular morphemes by engaging in a search for what are known as běnzì 本字 ("original characters").
  • Taiwanese, Mandarin, and Taiwan's language situation 11 September 2009 12:18 UTC www.pinyin.info [Source type: Original source]

.Be careful about your opinions on sensitive political subjects (including, but not necessarily limited to cross-strait relations).^ According to Taiwan's Cross-Strait Relations Act, its citizens residing in the PRC will lose citizenship if they do not return within four years.
  • Taiwan 28 January 2010 1:57 UTC www.state.gov [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.In addition, if you see what looks like blood spewing from the driver's mouth, or him spitting blood onto the street - not to fret, it's merely him chewing betel nut (see box).^ And if you're looking for a particular address, you'll notice that the buildings aren't numbered sequentially (rather, it's in the order that they were constructed on that street.

^ By looking at the train map, you'll see that there is no station marked "Ginza."

^ By looking at the Bilingual Atlas , you'll see that the nearest train station to the Ginza is Yuurakucho, on the JR Yamanote line.

Keep in mind, however, that betel nuts are a stimulant.
.Taxi drivers are generally friendly towards foreigners, and a few of them take the opportunity to try their limited English skills.^ The people of Taiwan are generally outgoing toward foreigners and often will go out of their way to assist visitors.
  • 1996 Country Commercial Guides 19 September 2009 13:27 UTC dosfan.lib.uic.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.They are most likely to ask you about yourself, and are a patient audience to your attempts at speaking Mandarin.^ Most working visas can be extended at least once, and sometimes you can get up to 3 extensions before your passport is stamped with "Final Extension."

^ You should have your destination written down on paper, at least in Hiragana, and ask your driver (preferably, in Japanese) to tell you when you have reached where you are going.

^ So, if you don't have good directions to follow yourself, stop by the nearest police box and ask for help.

.If you are traveling with small children, don't be surprised if they are given candy when you disembark.^ If you have a satellite dish, you can get a lot more programs, but the Japan Times listings only state that there are "cartoons" on in any given slot, they don't give actual titles.

^ The common Japanese philosophy holds that you digest food better after a good hot bath in the evening (they don't bathe of shower in the morning, but that is when they do shave.

^ Travelling Lightly:     Do not bring things you don't want to carry.

Women are sometimes warned not to take taxis alone at night. This is not an extreme risk, although there have been incidents where women have been attacked. .To be more safe, women can have the hotel or restaurant phone a cab for them (ensuring a licensed driver), have a companion write down the license number of the driver (clearly displayed on the dashboard), or keep a cell phone handy.^ Travel agencies will book your hotel room for you, but you'll have to phone or write to a ryoukan or youth hostel on your own.

^ When a character in one of my stories says something, clearly it's one kind [of language], but when I write it down it's another kind [of language].
  • Taiwanese, Mandarin, and Taiwan's language situation 11 September 2009 12:18 UTC www.pinyin.info [Source type: Original source]

Do not get in if the driver doesn't have a license with picture clearly displayed in the cab.

By scooter or motorcycle

Scooters with an engine size of 50cc require a license to drive, and should be insured and registered in the owner's name. Until 2003 it wasn't possible to get a scooter above 150cc. .Many of the scooters within cities are only 50cc and incapable of going faster than 80 km/h (50 mph).^ More than 80 percent of the U.S.- made process control systems sold in Taiwan go to state-run firms and large-scale private enterprises.
  • 1996 Country Commercial Guides 19 September 2009 13:27 UTC dosfan.lib.uic.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ But, it's a lot more difficult to do within the bigger cities, so you'll be better off hitching only outside the cities.

.The more powerful versions known as zhongxing (heavy format) scooters are now quite common and can be rented for short-term use, or found for sale used at English In Taiwan [20] if you're going to need it for a while.^ It's used more as an insult, and will turn people off of you.

^ They are willing to absorb a short-term—they are sure it is going to be a short-term—hiccup in their economic growth in order to restore the national honor.
  • MILITARY CAPABILITIES OF THE PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF CHINA 28 January 2010 1:44 UTC commdocs.house.gov [Source type: Original source]

^ But for short-term crash space, they're rather pleasant.

.They are not allowed on freeways even if they are capable of going faster than 100 km/h (62 mph) unless used for certain police purposes, but that just means you have to take the scenic route.^ Otherwise, don't bother -- just go to the JR information window (or nearest tourist information office) and get a small copy of the map so you'll know what lines to take, and what stations to make your connections at.

^ If you just want to spend money on silly stuff, go to a grocery store and look around.

^ The approach to use here is to look to the side, say "Wakerimasen" -- I don't understand you -- and just keep walking.

.If you're just learning to drive a scooter on the streets of Taiwan, it would be a good idea to practice a bit on a back road or alley until you have a feel for the scooter - attempting to do so in the busier cities could easily be fatal.^ It could also attempt the and economic infrastructure to target the Taiwan equivalent of a blockade by declaring exercise or people’s confidence in their leadership.
  • Military Power Report of People's Republic of China 2008 28 January 2010 1:44 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Just take a look: come to America And speak Shanghainese, Cantonese, Speak Shandongese, Pekingese; Would anyone dare to beat you for it?
  • Taiwanese, Mandarin, and Taiwan's language situation 11 September 2009 12:18 UTC www.pinyin.info [Source type: Original source]

^ Since cards are required on nearly every business occasion, it is a good idea to carry sizable numbers of them at all times.
  • 1996 Country Commercial Guides 19 September 2009 13:27 UTC dosfan.lib.uic.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.Certainly, things can get pretty hairy on Taiwanese roads and Taipei in particular has narrower more congested roads than many other cities.^ In most major Chinese cities one of the main streets is named "Zhongshan" (中山) to memorialize him, a name even more commonly found than other popular choices such as "Renmin Lu" (人民路), or The People's Road, and "Jiefang Lu" (解放路), or Liberation Road.
  • Exploring Chinese History :: Database Catalog :: Biographical Database :: Republic of China (Taiwan)- (1949- Present) 28 January 2010 1:44 UTC www.ibiblio.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ In reality, more colloquial styles of Taiwanese would undoubtedly have fewer than 40% of their morphemes written with characters that everyone could agree were the right ones.
  • Taiwanese, Mandarin, and Taiwan's language situation 11 September 2009 12:18 UTC www.pinyin.info [Source type: Original source]

^ And, since Canadians, the British, and Australians can get working holiday visas, they are more likely to get work than other people that need to be sponsored for a working visa (which is a big hassle for the company.

.However if you know what you're doing, it's the perfect way to get around in a city.^ Most western airlines bury this tax in the cost of the ticket, so you don't know that you're actually paying it.

^ For the cost of repairing the flat, you have yourself a decent way to get around.

^ Again, you're best bet is to find a company in your home country that has a Japanese branch, and get posted that way.

.It should be possible to rent a scooter by the day, week or month, depending on the city in which you're staying.^ Please note that if one of the participants are in the United Kingdom, you should select a city there (e.g.
  • The World Clock Meeting Planner 19 September 2009 13:27 UTC www.timeanddate.com [Source type: News]

^ Airlines:     It's assumed that if you are only staying in Japan less than a month, that you have already booked your return flight.

^ If you plan on staying for one month or more, make sure that all medical and health concerns are addressed before you leave (ie.

.In Taipei, as of September 2008, the only place legally renting scooters and motorbikes to foreigners is the Bikefarm [21], which is run by a very friendly and helpful English guy called Jeremy.^ At the same time, word had gone out that Japan was a good place to come to for easy money -- the only qualification you needed was the ability to speak English.

^ It's a fun place to go climbing, and the people are very friendly.

^ The people are very friendly and helpful, the surroundings are more relaxed and user-friendly, and besides, Fukuoka is one of the most pleasant places I've visited in Japan.

.In Taichung, Foreigner Assistance Services In Taiwan F.A.S.T [22] offers a rental service for foreign visitors.^ In January 2006 CLA opened the Foreign Workers Service Center at Taiwan Taoyuan International Airport.
  • Taiwan 28 January 2010 1:57 UTC www.state.gov [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Up to NTD 40,000 and USD 5,000 can be brought into Taiwan by a foreign visitor.
  • 1996 Country Commercial Guides 19 September 2009 13:27 UTC dosfan.lib.uic.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Youth and Education Student Website Diplomatic History Student Career Programs Virtual Student Foreign Service Youth Exchange Programs Fulbright Program Exchange Visitor Program U.S. Diplomacy Center More...
  • Taiwan 28 January 2010 1:57 UTC www.state.gov [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.Otherwise, scooters are generally easy to rent in most major cities, with many such places being conveniently located near railway or bus stations.^ Police Boxes are located near most train stations, and at major intersections throughout the city.

^ However, the only real anime cards sold most places in each city are for Chibi Maruko Chan .

^ It should not be too surprising to know that alcoholism is a major problem in Japan, while most Japanese still don't recognise it as such.

.Most usually require some form of identification even if, in some cases, it consists of your expired Blockbuster video card!^ Therefore, even if you don't have a job, if you are staying at one place for more than a few weeks, you should have some cards made up with your home address and phone number included.

.The average price you may expect is $400 for 24 hours, this includes one or two helmets.^ Sometimes, you may need to take the JR line to one station, walk outside and downstairs to the underground, and then buy another ticket to hop the subway.

^ Don't pack more than you need for one or two weeks.

^ The rates differ from place to place, and room to room, but you can rent a room for one hour or for the night.

Another option is to rent a motorcycle. Many foreigners swear by their 125cc Wild Wolf motorcycles, and a trip around the island on a motorcycle can be a great way to see the island up close.
It is to be mentioned that since 2007, scooters and motorcycle over 450cc are allowed to go on expressway providing that they have a red license plate. .They are however to be considered as cars, and as such cannot be parked in scooter parking spaces.^ As a result of rising incomes, car ownership more than tripled from 1985 to 1994, causing a shortage of parking spaces, especially in urban areas.
  • 1996 Country Commercial Guides 19 September 2009 13:27 UTC dosfan.lib.uic.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

By car

.An international driving license is required for driving in Taiwan and may be used for up to 30 days, after which you'll need to apply for a local permit.^ In other cases where licenses are required, the importer may need to first obtain the authorization of numerous agencies, such as Taiwan's Department of Health for medical equipment, and the Council of Agriculture for fishing and sporting boats--in the rare instances where import licenses have been granted--and many agricultural items.
  • 1996 Country Commercial Guides 19 September 2009 13:27 UTC dosfan.lib.uic.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Sometimes, you may need to take the JR line to one station, walk outside and downstairs to the underground, and then buy another ticket to hop the subway.

^ You may be told that it's a 50 credit, or 100 credit card, but the magnetic strip is still convinced that it has been used heavily already.

Some municipalities may impose additional restrictions, so check ahead with the rental shop. VIP Rentals [23] in Taipei is quite happy to rent cars to foreigners, and will even deliver the car to a given destination. A deposit is often required, and the last day of rental is not pro-rated, but calculated on a per-hour basis at a separate (higher) rate.
.The numbered highway system is very good in Taiwan.^ Import Licenses Taiwan continues to maintain an import licensing system, but the number of items requiring import licenses is being gradually reduced.
  • 1996 Country Commercial Guides 19 September 2009 13:27 UTC dosfan.lib.uic.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ From 1955 to 1960 Chiang administered the construction and completion of the Taiwan's highway system.
  • Exploring Chinese History :: Database Catalog :: Biographical Database :: Republic of China (Taiwan)- (1949- Present) 28 January 2010 1:44 UTC www.ibiblio.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Japan does have a good health-care system, but it is expensive, and can be very stressful for foreigners.

.Most traffic signs are in international symbols, but many signs show names of places and streets in Chinese only.^ However, the only real anime cards sold most places in each city are for Chibi Maruko Chan .

^ Often it is shortened to Zhongshan only (as is usually done for Chinese names to show respect), and inside China one can find many instances of Zhongshan Avenue, Zhongshan Park, etc.
  • Exploring Chinese History :: Database Catalog :: Biographical Database :: Republic of China (Taiwan)- (1949- Present) 28 January 2010 1:44 UTC www.ibiblio.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Visitors who arrive at the Chiang Kai-shek International Airport in Taipei are greeted by signs in Chinese welcoming them to the "Zhongzheng International Airport."
  • Exploring Chinese History :: Database Catalog :: Biographical Database :: Republic of China (Taiwan)- (1949- Present) 28 January 2010 1:44 UTC www.ibiblio.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.Nevertheless, almost all official directional signs will be written in both Chinese and English.^ It is advisable for foreign visitors to have their cards printed in both English and Chinese.
  • 1996 Country Commercial Guides 19 September 2009 13:27 UTC dosfan.lib.uic.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ For both the trains and the subway, usually the signs will be in Kanji and English.

.However, the non-standardized Romanization means that English names can vary between road signs, making it rather confusing.^ BN- Birth Name PY- Pinyin romanization WG- Wade Giles romanization Y- Yale romanization Western names will be alphabetically sorted according to western biographical standards, or by surname.
  • Exploring Chinese History :: Database Catalog :: Biographical Database :: Republic of China (Taiwan)- (1949- Present) 28 January 2010 1:44 UTC www.ibiblio.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ To further expand the already confusing issue of Chiang Kai-shek's name, below are variations: .
  • Exploring Chinese History :: Database Catalog :: Biographical Database :: Republic of China (Taiwan)- (1949- Present) 28 January 2010 1:44 UTC www.ibiblio.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ If you have a train map, each of the lines will be color-coded, with a color chart at the bottom listing the names of the lines (make sure that you have an English version of the map.

The highways are in excellent shape with toll stations around every 30 km (19 mi). Currently a car driver pays $40 when passing each toll station on a highway. .Prepaid tickets may be purchased at most convenience stores, allowing faster passage and eliminating the need to count out exact change while driving.^ Sometimes, you may need to take the JR line to one station, walk outside and downstairs to the underground, and then buy another ticket to hop the subway.

^ It is not necessary to tip in taxis unless assistance with luggage is rendered, but most drivers do appreciate being allowed to keep small change.
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^ Although the department stores do purchase some merchandise on their own account, most of their sales are through the concessionaires.
  • 1996 Country Commercial Guides 19 September 2009 13:27 UTC dosfan.lib.uic.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.While driving may be the best way to get around the countryside, in larger cities like Taipei and Kaohsiung, traffic jams are a problem as well as the difficulty of finding a good parking space, especially during the rush hour and traffic tends to get chaotic so you might be better off relying on public transport instead.^ If you view this as a frat house, you may be better off.

^ This is good for short trips around a city.

^ If you can, get as much sleep as possible during the "night" hours.

By thumb

.While Taiwanese themselves don't generally hitchhike, foreigners who have done so say that it was very easy.^ It is very difficult for most Japanese to meet new people -- they're so afraid of embarassing themselves and other people that they won't say anything at all.

.However, in rural areas people may not recognize the thumb in the air symbol, and you may have to try other ways - flagging down a car might work on a country lane with little or no public transportation, but doing so on a major road might lead to confusion, with the driver assuming that you are in trouble.^ If you work for a company that has a branch office, try to get them to transfer you to Japan.

^ PLA, the People's Liberation Army journals and other military publications are full of scenarios in which the People's Liberation Army engages an unnamed enemy which is technologically superior, and really has to be us, no question about it.
  • MILITARY CAPABILITIES OF THE PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF CHINA 28 January 2010 1:44 UTC commdocs.house.gov [Source type: Original source]

^ But if you're at a gaijin house, or an older apartment, you may find that there're too many people competing for the shower, or that there's no hot water during the winter.

.A sign, especially one in Chinese, would therefore be of great help.^ I think it is the Chinese unhappiness with one superpower that is causing the problems, and Taiwan is a manifestation of that but it is certainly—if Taiwan were to disappear tomorrow, I believe that the problem would still be there with the United States.
  • MILITARY CAPABILITIES OF THE PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF CHINA 28 January 2010 1:44 UTC commdocs.house.gov [Source type: Original source]

.The East coast around Hualien and Taitung enjoys a reputation for being especially good for getting rides.^ U.S. goods enjoy a reputation for quality on the island; the reputation for high quality however, is coupled with a reputation for high-cost and, sometimes, poor service from U.S. vendors.
  • 1996 Country Commercial Guides 19 September 2009 13:27 UTC dosfan.lib.uic.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.Taiwanese people are very friendly and helpful, so striking up a conversation with someone at a transport cafe or freeway service station may well see you on your way.^ On a crowded train, someone may feel you up.

^ You can have your resume printed up for you, bilingually, at any of the Information Services.

^ Sometimes, you may need to take the JR line to one station, walk outside and downstairs to the underground, and then buy another ticket to hop the subway.

.However, to avoid possible confusion later, ensure that the driver realizes that you want a free ride.^ However, the bigger stations have maps on the wall, showing you where you are, and how to find the exit you want.

^ So, when you insert your money, you must first select the name of the train line you want to ride.

^ If you have a JR Rail Pass, you can ride any JR train or bus for free as long as the pass is good.

By bike

.While known for being a major player in the bicycle industry (though companies such as Giant and Meridia), until fairly recently, bicycles in Taiwan were considered an unwanted reminder of less prosperous times.^ Taiwan is a major investor in China, and China recently passed the United States as Taiwan's largest export market.
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^ A local partner can give the best advice on where and how to advertise, but participation in the major trade shows and advertisement in the relevant Taiwan trade journals and industry newspapers is important.
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^ Taiwan has comprehensive commercial laws, including a Company Law, Commercial Registration Law, Business Registration Law, Commercial Accounting Law, and laws for specific industries.
  • 1996 Country Commercial Guides 19 September 2009 13:27 UTC dosfan.lib.uic.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

Thankfully, this has changed in the Twenty-First Century. Bicycling is again on the rise, both as a tool for commuting and recreation, and support infrastructure is slowly being put into place. Several bike paths have been built, and recreational cycling has become quite popular amongst locals, especially on weekends. .However, you should also be aware that local drivers have a well deserved reputation for recklessness.^ You should have your destination written down on paper, at least in Hiragana, and ask your driver (preferably, in Japanese) to tell you when you have reached where you are going.

^ American-made chemical machinery has a strong reputation and is well accepted by local users.
  • 1996 Country Commercial Guides 19 September 2009 13:27 UTC dosfan.lib.uic.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

As such, you should exercise extreme caution when cycling outside of designated bicycle lanes and trails.
In recent years, the government has been promoting bicycling as a method of clean recreation. Several designated bicycle paths have been built throughout Taiwan (especially along riverside parks). .Additionally, long distance rides, including through the Central Mountain Range, and along the coastline around the main island have become popular [24].^ You can ride from one end of the line to the other, and back for the price of the cheapest ticket on the line (as long as you don't leave the train and exit one of the stations along the way.

.For long distance trips, bicycles can be shipped as is using standard freight service from the Taiwan Railway Administration between larger stations.^ Telecom services providers are expected to benefit from the planned signing of a financial MOU between Taiwan and China, through which they will be able...
  • Login to DIGITIMES archive & research 20 November 2009 10:28 UTC www.digitimes.com [Source type: General]

^ Despite their long-standing enmity, commercial ties between the two sides of the Taiwan straits have grown rapidly since the late 1980s.
  • 1996 Country Commercial Guides 19 September 2009 13:27 UTC dosfan.lib.uic.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ If you are making a long-distance call using a phone card, you can see the numbers on the readout decrease rather quickly.

A price table is available at: [25] (Chinese language only). .Non-folding bicycles may also be transported aboard the Taipei and Kaohsiung rapid transit systems if loaded at specific stations, during off peak hours (usually 10AM-4PM on weekdays, check with your local station personnel to confirm).^ If so, you may find that the non-reserved cars are completely filled with people at the peak times.

^ If your destination station is large (like Shinjuku,) getting out of the station may be as confusing as trying to find the train you want.

^ During peak tourist periods, you may need reservations for any given hostel.

  • Taipei MRT Bicycle Information: [26]
    • Taipei MRT Route Map, bicycles may be loaded at designated stations: [27]
  • Kaohsiung MRT Bicycle Information (passengers traveling with non-folding bicycles are assessed a flat rate NT$60 fare irrespective of distance): [28]
.Giant Bicycles Corporation operates a large network of bicycle retail stores that offer rentals for as little as $1000 per day, if requested one week in advance [29].^ Just remember that although Japan is a very modern country in most respects, an advanced, publically available computer network is not one of them.

^ You can get a variety of beers and cups of sake from vending machines on the streets in front of liquor stores, up until midnight on any day of the week.

^ Convenience Stores: Now over 1000 strong island wide, convenience stores, which offer food products and toiletries 24 hours a day, are major outlets for consumer food items, such as snack foods, beverages, and juices.
  • 1996 Country Commercial Guides 19 September 2009 13:27 UTC dosfan.lib.uic.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

Public shared bicycles are also available for rent at automated kiosks in Taipei's Hsinyi District, and in Kaohsiung. .Rental fees in Taipei may be paid using the rapid transit EasyCard system, but require a deposit paid via credit card.^ You may be told that it's a 50 credit, or 100 credit card, but the magnetic strip is still convinced that it has been used heavily already.

^ Your home country bank may tell you that you can use your ATM card at ATMachines in Japan.

^ Japan is a cash-based society, which means that checks are not used very much, and international credit cards are accepted mainly by hotels and restaurants.

.Additionally, many local police stations provide basic support services for cyclists, such as air pumps, and as a rest stop.^ Express trains are like locals, except that they only stop at certain stations along the line.

Further cycling references:
You say Zhongshan, I say Chungshan...
.The Romanization of Chinese used in Taiwan is not standardized.^ "Chinese National Standards (CNS)", written and published by the National Bureau of Standards of the Ministry of Economic Affairs, list relevant standards requirements for imported products into Taiwan.
  • 1996 Country Commercial Guides 19 September 2009 13:27 UTC dosfan.lib.uic.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Interim Provisions Concerning the Use of Donations in Foreign Exchange Made by Overseas Chinese and Compatriots From Hong Kong, Macao and Taiwan in the Regulation of Foreign Exchange .

.Most older place names and personal names are derived from a bastardized version of Wade-Giles.^ Chinese names will be alphabetically sorted according to Wade- Giles romanization of the Chinese name.
  • Exploring Chinese History :: Database Catalog :: Biographical Database :: Republic of China (Taiwan)- (1949- Present) 28 January 2010 1:44 UTC www.ibiblio.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Often, the name is shortened to Zhongzheng only (Chung-cheng in Wade-Giles) in the style of typical courtesy names (out of respect).
  • Exploring Chinese History :: Database Catalog :: Biographical Database :: Republic of China (Taiwan)- (1949- Present) 28 January 2010 1:44 UTC www.ibiblio.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ The "school name" was actually the formal name of a person, the name used by older people to call the person, so it was the name that the person would use the most in the first decades of his life (as the person grew older, younger generations would have to use one of the courtesy names instead).
  • Exploring Chinese History :: Database Catalog :: Biographical Database :: Republic of China (Taiwan)- (1949- Present) 28 January 2010 1:44 UTC www.ibiblio.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.Though the national government mandated the controversial and oft-maligned Tongyong Pinyin system in 2002, local governments are free to override the order.^ Wang Jingwei's National Government, though popular with the masses, was weak militarily and was soon overtaken by a local warlord, forcing Wang and his leftist government into joining him in Nanjing.
  • Exploring Chinese History :: Database Catalog :: Biographical Database :: Republic of China (Taiwan)- (1949- Present) 28 January 2010 1:44 UTC www.ibiblio.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ His government sought to impose Chinese nationalism and repressed the local culture, such as by forbidding the use of Taiwanese in mass media broadcasts or in schools.
  • Exploring Chinese History :: Database Catalog :: Biographical Database :: Republic of China (Taiwan)- (1949- Present) 28 January 2010 1:44 UTC www.ibiblio.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.Some local governments, such as that of Taipei City, have converted their street signs to Hanyu Pinyin, which sometimes results in a street sign posted by the city government next to a street sign by the national government having different romanization conventions.^ Some local trains will parallel the shinkansen lines and connect the cities together.

^ Although normal precautions should be taken by visitors, the streets of Taipei and other cities are safe at any hour.
  • 1996 Country Commercial Guides 19 September 2009 13:27 UTC dosfan.lib.uic.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ In 1928, Chiang was named Generalissimo of all Chinese forces and Chairman of the National Government, a post he held until 1932 and later from 1943 until 1948.
  • Exploring Chinese History :: Database Catalog :: Biographical Database :: Republic of China (Taiwan)- (1949- Present) 28 January 2010 1:44 UTC www.ibiblio.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

For example, Zhongshan, Chungshan, Jungshan and Jhongshan can easily be the same.
.This article attempts to use the Romanizations most commonly used in Taiwan (on street signs, buses, tourist maps, etc.^ Opened in 1980, the Hsinchu Science-Based Industrial Park is Taiwan's most visible attempt to move into technology-intensive industries.
  • 1996 Country Commercial Guides 19 September 2009 13:27 UTC dosfan.lib.uic.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

). People know Romanisation as 'Roma-Pinyin'.
.A mix of Taiwanese (Minnan), Mandarin, Hakka and other Asian languages are spoken on the island, as well as several aboriginal Austronesian languages.^ This is the period that sees China proliferating to Pakistan and several other countries as well, stealing American secrets from various laboratories, and the administration looking the other way.
  • MILITARY CAPABILITIES OF THE PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF CHINA 28 January 2010 1:44 UTC commdocs.house.gov [Source type: Original source]

^ There are also several domestic airports and domestic airlines that provide fast and convenient connecting flights between Taiwan's larger cities, as well as outlying islands.
  • 1996 Country Commercial Guides 19 September 2009 13:27 UTC dosfan.lib.uic.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

Mandarin is the lingua franca, but Taiwanese is spoken by some 70% of the population. .In the North where there is a large concentration of so-called "mainlanders" (those whose families came to Taiwan from China in the mid 20th century), most people speak Mandarin as their primary language (although Taiwanese is spoken in abundance), but in the South of the island, Taiwanese is far more common.^ Department Stores: There are over 50 department stores on Taiwan, concentrated in the large cities.
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^ English is by far the most popular foreign language, and large numbers of people speak it with fluency.
  • 1996 Country Commercial Guides 19 September 2009 13:27 UTC dosfan.lib.uic.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Traditionally, this name was not used in intercourse with people outside of the family, and inside mainland China or Taiwan few people know that his "real" name (the concept of real or original name is not as clear-cut in China as it is in the Western world) was Jiang Zhoutai (although other historical figures such as Mao Zedong are known by their "register name").
  • Exploring Chinese History :: Database Catalog :: Biographical Database :: Republic of China (Taiwan)- (1949- Present) 28 January 2010 1:44 UTC www.ibiblio.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.On the Matsu islands, the dominant Chinese dialect is Mindong or Eastern Min (also known as Hokchiu or Foochowese), which is also spoken in the area around Fuzhou and the coastal areas of northern Fujian.^ Taiwanese, a variant of the Fukien dialect, is also commonly spoken, especially in the southern and rural areas.
  • 1996 Country Commercial Guides 19 September 2009 13:27 UTC dosfan.lib.uic.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.The Mandarin in Taiwan is a bit different from the official Beijing Dialect; most notably, Taiwan continues to use traditional Chinese characters, not the simplified versions used on the mainland.^ His name also used to be officially written in Taiwan as "The Late President (space) Lord Chiang" (先總統 蔣公), where the one-character-wide space showed respect; this practice lost its popularity after Taiwan's democratization in the 1990s.
  • Exploring Chinese History :: Database Catalog :: Biographical Database :: Republic of China (Taiwan)- (1949- Present) 28 January 2010 1:44 UTC www.ibiblio.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Where possible, names will include Chinese character references in either traditional (BIG5) or simplified (GB) characters or both.
  • Exploring Chinese History :: Database Catalog :: Biographical Database :: Republic of China (Taiwan)- (1949- Present) 28 January 2010 1:44 UTC www.ibiblio.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Not surprisingly, the Chinese Communists always rejected the use of this name, and the name is not very well known in mainland China.
  • Exploring Chinese History :: Database Catalog :: Biographical Database :: Republic of China (Taiwan)- (1949- Present) 28 January 2010 1:44 UTC www.ibiblio.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

Taiwanese Mandarin also tends to not differentiate between the "S" and "Sh" sounds in Mandarin. .All people schooled after 1945 are generally fluent in Mandarin, although it is sometimes not the first language of choice.^ You don't necessarily have to speak the language to survive in Japan, because many signs are in English, and a fair number of people have at least studied English in school.

^ The "school name" was actually the formal name of a person, the name used by older people to call the person, so it was the name that the person would use the most in the first decades of his life (as the person grew older, younger generations would have to use one of the courtesy names instead).
  • Exploring Chinese History :: Database Catalog :: Biographical Database :: Republic of China (Taiwan)- (1949- Present) 28 January 2010 1:44 UTC www.ibiblio.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

Mandarin is fairly popular with young people. .Some in the older generation are not fluent in Mandarin as they were schooled in Japanese or not at all.^ It's especially bad when talking to someone from an anime or manga studio, when they are surrounded by Japanese otaku all the time.

^ The listings may be old, but you'll get some more addresses this way, and you can ask these schools if they can refer you to other schools that also have job openings currently.

^ It is very difficult for most Japanese to meet new people -- they're so afraid of embarassing themselves and other people that they won't say anything at all.

.Universally the Taiwanese are very accepting of foreigners and react with curiosity and admiration for trying the local tongue.^ However, he has stated that his actions were also based on the premise that a Chinese identity and a Taiwanese identity are ultimately incompatible, a notion that is very controversial on the island, even among supporters of localization.
  • Exploring Chinese History :: Database Catalog :: Biographical Database :: Republic of China (Taiwan)- (1949- Present) 28 January 2010 1:44 UTC www.ibiblio.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.Generally, most people in Taiwan converse using a combination of Mandarin and Taiwanese by code-switching.^ China might Taiwan’s military and political leadership, and use a variety of lethal, punitive, or disruptive military possibly break the Taiwan people’s will to fight.
  • Military Power Report of People's Republic of China 2008 28 January 2010 1:44 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ The "school name" was actually the formal name of a person, the name used by older people to call the person, so it was the name that the person would use the most in the first decades of his life (as the person grew older, younger generations would have to use one of the courtesy names instead).
  • Exploring Chinese History :: Database Catalog :: Biographical Database :: Republic of China (Taiwan)- (1949- Present) 28 January 2010 1:44 UTC www.ibiblio.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ As the courtesy name is the name used by people of the same generation to call the person, Chiang Kai-shek soon became known under this new name.
  • Exploring Chinese History :: Database Catalog :: Biographical Database :: Republic of China (Taiwan)- (1949- Present) 28 January 2010 1:44 UTC www.ibiblio.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.The Taiwanese dialect is a variant of Minnan which is similar to the dialect spoken across the Taiwan Strait in Xiamen.^ Taiwanese, a variant of the Fukien dialect, is also commonly spoken, especially in the southern and rural areas.
  • 1996 Country Commercial Guides 19 September 2009 13:27 UTC dosfan.lib.uic.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ On May 2, he met with Wang Daohan, the 90-year-old chairman of the mainland-based Association for Relations Across the Taiwan Straits, and the representatives of Taiwanese businesspeople.
  • Exploring Chinese History :: Database Catalog :: Biographical Database :: Republic of China (Taiwan)- (1949- Present) 28 January 2010 1:44 UTC www.ibiblio.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.While both variants are largely mutually intelligible, they are not identical as Taiwanese has borrowed a substantial number of words from Japanese due to 50 years of Japanese rule, so Minnan speakers from China may have some difficulty understanding certain words.^ Since the incident, a large quantity of rumors, conspiracy theories, claims and counter-claims have been generated and propagated both on the Internet and in the Taiwanese media.
  • Exploring Chinese History :: Database Catalog :: Biographical Database :: Republic of China (Taiwan)- (1949- Present) 28 January 2010 1:44 UTC www.ibiblio.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ They have attempted to bring India and China together, and, indeed, to some degree they have succeeded.
  • MILITARY CAPABILITIES OF THE PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF CHINA 28 January 2010 1:44 UTC commdocs.house.gov [Source type: Original source]

^ In 1945, Taiwan was restored to Chinese rule after 50 years as a Japanese colony.
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All public announcements in the transportation system will be made in Mandarin, Taiwanese and Hakka, with the exception of the Matsu islands, where announcements are made in Mandarin and the Mindong dialect.
.Especially in Taipei, people generally speak a little English.^ Moreover, many people, especially those educated before the Second World War, can also speak Japanese.
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^ You don't necessarily have to speak the language to survive in Japan, because many signs are in English, and a fair number of people have at least studied English in school.

^ Chiang was also nicknamed "the Gimo" (short for "Generalissimo") by some English-speaking foreigners, especially by Americans during the Second World War.
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.The children often understand more English than their parents, especially with the emphasis on English language education today, and English being a compulsory subject from mid elementary school onwards.^ But times have changed, and most English schools in the big cities are being much more picky -- demanding certification in an ESL (English as a Second Language) program at the very least.

^ As a result of rising incomes, car ownership more than tripled from 1985 to 1994, causing a shortage of parking spaces, especially in urban areas.
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^ But there is more open-source information available today from China and a greater degree of potential intelligence access than we have ever known.
  • MILITARY CAPABILITIES OF THE PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF CHINA 28 January 2010 1:44 UTC commdocs.house.gov [Source type: Original source]

.However, attempts to speak Mandarin or Taiwanese will be met with beaming smiles and encouragement, by and large.^ He speaks Taiwanese, Japanese, Mandarin, and English.
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.Quite a few people, especially in Taipei, are proficient in Japanese due to the high number of Japanese visitors.^ Moreover, many people, especially those educated before the Second World War, can also speak Japanese.
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.Staff for tourist attractions such as the Taipei 101, museums, hotels, popular restaurants and airport shops speak Japanese in addition to English, Mandarin and other local languages.^ You don't necessarily have to speak the language to survive in Japan, because many signs are in English, and a fair number of people have at least studied English in school.

^ If you want to meet some Japanese (and practice your language lessons on them), and any number of foreign English teachers, conversation houses are the places to be.

^ Foreign currency can be exchanged at the airport, as well as at authorities-designated banks, hotels, and shops.
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.In fact, if you are a visitor of East Asian descent who cannot understand Chinese, when a worker realizes this he or she may try speaking to you in Japanese before trying English.^ To get a feel for how much you do or don't understand, read Making Out in Japanese books 1 and 2, and Japanese Street Slang .

^ According to several people, the anime and manga artists don't really speak English much, so it's a little silly to drop in on a studio without an interpreter on hand.

^ It is a great honor and privilege to testify before you today on Russo-Chinese relations.
  • MILITARY CAPABILITIES OF THE PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF CHINA 28 January 2010 1:44 UTC commdocs.house.gov [Source type: Original source]

.In addition to this, some older people still understand and speak Japanese having lived through the fifty year period of Japanese rule.^ Moreover, many people, especially those educated before the Second World War, can also speak Japanese.
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^ The Taiwanese localization movement has its roots in the home rule groups founded during the Japanese era and sought to put emphasis on Taiwan as the center of people's lives as opposed Mainland China or Japan.
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^ In 1945, Taiwan was restored to Chinese rule after 50 years as a Japanese colony.
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See

Landscapes and Scenery

Taiwan is home to some very stunning landscapes, and it is worthwhile to leave the grimy and densely populated west coast for the sparsely populated countryside. The Taroko Gorge near Hualien in particular is very impressive, and should not be missed by any tourists. Much of Taiwan is covered with mountains so hiking opportunities are very diverse.
.
  • Spring Scream - A three day outdoor rock concert in Kenting held on 5-7 Apr 2007. Tickets $1,400 for all days, all venues.^ The following is a list of the 10 holidays and three festivals in Taiwan: Holidays Date -------------------------------------- -------------- Founding Day January 1 Spring Festival (Chinese New Year) Late Jan.
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    $650 for one day, one venue. Kenting's entire area gets swarmed by young people coming to party for 3 days, and Taiwanese TV heavily reports on the latest Bikini fashions seen on the spot.[31]
  • Buddha's Birthday - Colorful but simple ceremonies are held at Buddhist monasteries that generally consist of washing a statue of the Buddha and a vegetarian feast. It is appropriate to make offerings to the monks and nuns at this time, though it is not mandatory. .24 May 2008.
  • Dragon Boat Festival - A festival to commemorate the death of the Chinese patriotic poet Qu Yuan (born 340 BC), who drowned himself in a river out of despair that his beloved country, Chu, was being plundered by a neighboring country as a result of betrayal by his own people.^ If any of them are making return trips to the country, you may get them to help you out a little with either filling out the forms, or getting around in the airport.

    ^ Dates for the three festivals -- which include Chinese Lunar New Year day, Dragon Boat Festival, and Mid-Autumn (Moon) Festival -- change with the lunar calendar.
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    ^ In fact, many of the yearly festivals are supported and assisted by volunteer Yakusa who are helping out their community.

    .The festival falls on the 5th day of the 5th lunar month (19 June 2008), and is marked by races of colorful dragon boats at various locations throughout the island.
  • Cherry Blossom Season - Every spring, in Yangmingshan (陽明山).
  • Hot Springs - Taiwan's geographical location between an oceanic trench and volcanic system makes it an ideal hot springs vacation spot.^ It's generally best to visit Tokyo are mid-Spring, and early Fall: the winter is cold and damp, the summer is hot and sticky, and it rains heavily inbetween.

    ^ Dates for the three festivals -- which include Chinese Lunar New Year day, Dragon Boat Festival, and Mid-Autumn (Moon) Festival -- change with the lunar calendar.
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    ^ There are also several domestic airports and domestic airlines that provide fast and convenient connecting flights between Taiwan's larger cities, as well as outlying islands.
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    There are several hot springs destinations throughout the country, including Wulai (烏來) and Yangmingshan (陽明山).

Gambling

While gambling is technically illegal in Taiwan, mahjong (Mandarin: 麻将 má jiàng; Taiwanese: 麻雀 moâ-chhiok) remains popular in Taiwan. .The Taiwanese version of the game differs significantly from the better known Cantonese and Japanese versions, most notably because a hand consists of 16 tiles instead of the 13 used in other version.^ However, Chiang's allied commander Chang Hsueh-liang, whose forces were to be used in his attack and whose homeland of Manchuria had been invaded by the Japanese, had other plans.
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^ His classmates included other children of influential Chinese families, most notably the future Chinese Communist party leader, Deng Xiaoping.
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^ Like many other Chinese historical figures, Chiang Kai-shek used several names throughout his life, and he is known under several of these names.
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However, it remains mostly a family and friends affair and there are no publicly advertised mahjong parlours.

Buy

.The currency of Taiwan is the New Taiwan Dollar (NTD, but also referred to as TWD) (新臺幣 or just 臺幣), with one unit known locally as NT, yuan (元 or more formally 圓) when written in Chinese or colloquially in Mandarin as the kuai (塊).^ The New Taiwan dollar (NTD) is the official currency.
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^ Sun was a uniting figure in post-imperial China, and remains unique among 20th century Chinese politicians for being widely revered in both mainland China and Taiwan.
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^ I think it is the Chinese unhappiness with one superpower that is causing the problems, and Taiwan is a manifestation of that but it is certainly—if Taiwan were to disappear tomorrow, I believe that the problem would still be there with the United States.
  • MILITARY CAPABILITIES OF THE PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF CHINA 28 January 2010 1:44 UTC commdocs.house.gov [Source type: Original source]

One unit is known colloquially as the kho͘ (箍) in the Taiwanese dialect. .Consistent with Wikitravel policy, all $ prices in this guide are in New Taiwan Dollars.^ A new opposition party, the Chinese New Party consisting mainly of second generation "mainlanders" who have grown up in Taiwan, broke off from the KMT in 1993.
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^ Taiwan's new Consumer Protection Law requires that all imported goods have Chinese language labels and instructions which shall be at least as comprehensive as the language-of-origin labels and accompanying instructions.
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^ The New Taiwan dollar (NTD) is the official currency.
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.As of May 2009, the exchange rate for US$1 is around $33, or €/$45. Easy rules of thumb are that $100 roughly equals US$3/€2.5; $1000 roughly equals US$30/€25. Coins come in denominations of $0.50, $1, $5, $10, $20 and $50. The $0.50 coin is rare because of its small value and has very little practical use.^ You may be told that it's a 50 credit, or 100 credit card, but the magnetic strip is still convinced that it has been used heavily already.

^ In Korea, the departure tax comes to about US$10.

^ As the reserve capacity of the power grid has fallen from over 20 percent to around 5-10 percent, power outages occasionaly occur during the summer months.
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Banknotes come in denominations of $100, $200, $500, $1000 and $2000. Perhaps due to counterfeiting problems, the $200 and $2000 banknotes are rarely seen.
.Taiwanese currency is fully convertible and there are no restrictions on taking currency into or out of the island.^ There have been no reports of private or official efforts to restrict the participation of foreign-invested firms in industry standards-setting consortia or organizations.
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^ There has been no reporting in the American press of these reports out of Hong Kong about an alliance, whether to deny them or criticize them in any meaningful way.
  • MILITARY CAPABILITIES OF THE PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF CHINA 28 January 2010 1:44 UTC commdocs.house.gov [Source type: Original source]

^ There is no certainty that China will grow into a major power in the near future for reasons I have indicated and more.
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.Currency exchange is possible internationally, although you will get a much better rate if you wait until you arrive at the airport to exchange currency at the 24 hour window.^ If you can, get as much sleep as possible during the "night" hours.

^ You're going to want to be as alert as possible when you arrive at the airport.

^ Nightly rates drop if you arrive after the peak hours -- sometime after 11:00 PM.     Some love hotels work on the vending machine principle: a light panel in the lobby shows you which rooms are available.

.Most banks in Taipei and Kaohsiung will also exchange money or offer cash advances on credit or debit cards.^ Taipei Bank Chapter IX. Business Travel Business Customs Formal business introductions in Taiwan are not complete without an exchange of business cards.
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^ Methods of Payment Bank-to-bank Letters of Credit (L/C) constitute Taiwan's most important import payment process.
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.Should you bring American currency, please be sure to bring newer bills as the banks and exchange-centers (such as in department stores) will only accept the newer bills (bills from 1996 and 2003 are not accepted at most places, due to a high proportion of forgeries bearing these years).^ Nearly all of these tenders are open only to firms with a local presence, and it can be difficult for outsiders to obtain advance information on such tenders.
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^ Any electronics that you want to bring with you should be pre-registered with Customs.

^ Since the relaxation of foreign currency controls in 1987, exchange between foreign currency and the NTD has become relatively free although exchange is still limited to authorized banks and dealers.
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.Bills which are torn or damaged will probably not be changed, and old-style small-bust bills are not accepted.^ Pink phones: The old-style pay phone, which doesn't accept phone cards, and can not be used for home country operator-assisted international calls.

.Taiwan National Bank will take older bank notes and bank notes that are wrinkled or torn for exchange.^ Taipei Bank Chapter IX. Business Travel Business Customs Formal business introductions in Taiwan are not complete without an exchange of business cards.
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^ All banks on Taiwan that are authorized to handle foreign exchange have extensive ties with one or more U.S. banks.
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.Department stores will not exchange bills older than 1997. Don't forget to show your passport!^ The exchange rate varies from day to day, and you might be able to get a better rate from a bank in your own country, than from one in Japan.

^ When you get back home, and want to convert your yen back to western currency, don't forget that you can't convert coins.

^ The clerk will punch up your bill on a pocket calculator and show it to you.

.If you've forgotten to bring any money at all, but have your credit or debit card handy, there's no need to fret.^ First, insert your card or money.

^ So bring your diploma with you.

^ You can buy film there, but it's cheaper to bring your own.

.Taiwan's banking system is light-years ahead of most other countries, with the ability to use any of the abundant 24-hour ATMs to withdraw cash from anywhere in the world using the Plus or Cirrus systems.^ Taiwan has a tightly regulated banking system.
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^ The relationship between China, the United States, and other countries is complicated, and the debate about China and Taiwan is reemerging in our Country.
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^ Your home country bank may tell you that you can use your ATM card at ATMachines in Japan.

.Certain banks' ATMs will even tell you your available balance in your own currency or in NT$.^ You can buy film there, but it's cheaper to bring your own.

^ Your home country bank may tell you that you can use your ATM card at ATMachines in Japan.

^ If you can read kanji, this map will tell you how much your trip will cost.

.There is a per transaction limit of $20,000 for ATM cash withdrawals (HSBC Global Access customers may withdraw $30,000 from HSBC ATMs).^ These places rent out for 30,000 to 60,000 yen per month.

^ For instance, a single large weapon detonated 300 miles high over Nebraska would blanket our whole country and at the margins there would be at least 10- to 20,000 kilovolts per meter of energy.
  • MILITARY CAPABILITIES OF THE PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF CHINA 28 January 2010 1:44 UTC commdocs.house.gov [Source type: Original source]

.Visa debit cards are not accepted in many places, but can be used at ATMs in Chinatrust banks (but not those in 7-11s).^ Your home country bank may tell you that you can use your ATM card at ATMachines in Japan.

^ Japan is a cash-based society, which means that checks are not used very much, and international credit cards are accepted mainly by hotels and restaurants.

^ Pink phones: The old-style pay phone, which doesn't accept phone cards, and can not be used for home country operator-assisted international calls.

.Most hotels and department stores accept credit cards, generally Visa and Master Card as well as JCB. Diners Club or American Express cards are seldom accepted.^ Japan is a cash-based society, which means that checks are not used very much, and international credit cards are accepted mainly by hotels and restaurants.

^ There is a magnetic strip within the card, which is used to store the actual number of credits remaining.

^ Most department stores will also have games departments, with some kind of selection for most game systems.

.Most restaurants and small stores do not accept cards, and cash is the main form of payment.^ Japan is a cash-based society, which means that checks are not used very much, and international credit cards are accepted mainly by hotels and restaurants.

^ In addition, internationally-recognized credit cards are accepted in many hotels, restaurants, and shops.
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^ If you need more cash, most credit card companies have offices in the big cities throughout Japan.

.Because street crime is rare, it is common for people in Taiwan to carry large amounts of cash with them.^ While violent crime is rare, Taiwan's pickpockets and thieves are extremely clever, so valuables should be properly secured.
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Costs

.Taiwan is fairly expensive by Asian standards, though still significantly cheaper than Japan.^ It will be cheaper than if you have it done in Japan.

^ You can mail packages via Air Mail (very expensive, but only takes 5 days,) Sea Mail (cheaper, but takes 1-2 months and is more subject to theft,) or Surface Airlift (SAL) (still takes 1-2 months, and is cheaper than Sea Mail, but has a minimum weight requirement.

^ Political violence Taiwan is a multi-party democracy, with a stable, though still evolving, democratic political institutions.
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.For a budget traveller on a bare bones budget, $1000 will get you by for a day, but you'll probably want to double that for comfort.^ When you get your plane ticket, you'll want to arrive at Narita Airport, if you plan on spending most of your time in Tokyo.

^ Especially if you want to travel, sightsee, sample the food, and buy stuff.

^ And most places will let you store your big bags there while you go on a short trip for a few days (if you want to travel light at that time.

.A meal at a street stall may cost $50 or less, a meal at a Western fast food restaurant will run you about $100 and at the fanciest restaurants, you can expect a bill in excess $1000. On the high end of the spectrum, hotel rooms at a swanky hotel might cost $5000 or more.^ To date most franchise operations have been fast food restaurants such as MacDonalds, Kentucky Fried Chicken, TGIF, Pizza Hut, Burger King, etc.
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^ So, if you take one cash advance, and then return home and deposit that money in a high-interest savings account, you are earning compound interest on about $950 until you finally receive the bill for that $1000 -- which may not be for 4 to 6 months.

^ The cost is a little higher than for a business hotel, and is a great way to spend the night even if you sleep alone.

Tipping

Tipping is generally not practised in Taiwan, with the possible exception of bellhops in high end hotels. .Full service restaurants typically impose a service charge and that is usually considered to be sufficient.^ A 10 percent service charge is usually added to restaurant and hotel bills, eliminating the need for gratuities in such situations.
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.Tipping is also not expected in taxis and drivers would usually return your change to the last dollar.^ That's where you are expected to put your money, and that's where they'll put your change.

^ It is not necessary to tip in taxis unless assistance with luggage is rendered, but most drivers do appreciate being allowed to keep small change.
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A typical night market in Taiwan may sell anything from food to clothing to fortune telling services
A typical night market in Taiwan may sell anything from food to clothing to fortune telling services
As in many Asian countries, night markets are a staple of Taiwanese entertainment, shopping and eating. Night markets are open-air markets, usually on a street or alleyway, with vendors selling all sorts of wares on every side. Many bargains can be had, and wherever prices are not displayed, haggling is expected. .In the larger cities you will have a night market every night and in the same place.^ US$7.00 a night puts a roof over your head, and you'll be four blocks from City Hall.

^ The rates differ from place to place, and room to room, but you can rent a room for one hour or for the night.

^ At the same time, word had gone out that Japan was a good place to come to for easy money -- the only qualification you needed was the ability to speak English.

.In smaller cities, they are only open certain nights of the week, and may move to different streets depending on the day of the week.^ Express trains are like locals, except that they only stop at certain stations along the line.

^ Train cards are very similar to phone cards, except that they're a little smaller, and are used only for purchasing train tickets.

^ Chen was shot in the stomach while campaigning in the city of Tainan on March 19, 2004, the day before polls opened.
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.Every city has at least one night market; larger cities like Taipei may have a dozen or more.^ One exception, however, is "multi-level marketing" which is becoming more popular as a second job to supplement household income.
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Night markets are crowded, so remember to watch out for your wallet! Shops selling the same items tend to congregate in the same part of the city. .If you want to buy something, ask someone to take you to one shop and there will probably be shops selling similar things nearby.^ Sometimes, you may need to take the JR line to one station, walk outside and downstairs to the underground, and then buy another ticket to hop the subway.

^ Deciding where to go to buy what you want is a slightly different matter.

^ There aren't many bargains left to be found here, and if you want inexpensive electronics or clothing, you're better off visiting Taiwan or Korea.

.For those who do not like the concept of haggling and fake goods, there are many shopping centres in Taipei where prices are usually fixed and goods are genuine.^ There are local trade shows for most major industries and CETRA is the co-organizer of many of these shows (usually in conjunction with the relevant industry association).
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^ In particular, those working in hotels, business, or public organizations are likely to have a good command of the language.
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.Otherwise, shopping streets in larger cities like Kaohsiung and Taichung can also easily get you what you want.^ If your destination station is large (like Shinjuku,) getting out of the station may be as confusing as trying to find the train you want.

^ Otherwise, when you change lines, you need to hand in your first ticket, follow the signs directing you to the train line you want, and the buy a second ticket.

^ Lockers:     Many train and bus stations have pay lockers where you can store your bags if you want to walk around a city for a few days.

.And of course, there is the trendy Ximending in Taipei, where you can pretty much find anything associated with the youths, also at fixed prices.^ But if you're at a gaijin house, or an older apartment, you may find that there're too many people competing for the shower, or that there's no hot water during the winter.

^ The rules state that you have to study pretty much full-time, and can not work more that 20 hours a week.

^ There is no other place to go for buying from such a huge selection of paraphenalia, books, and tapes at prices lower than you'll find at home.

Bargaining is OK and expected in night markets and small stores. .Computer chain shops and department stores normally have fixed prices, but at least in department stores you may get a "registered member discount" if you're shopping a lot.^ (Others will give you a discount if you are a member.

^ But if you're at a gaijin house, or an older apartment, you may find that there're too many people competing for the shower, or that there's no hot water during the winter.

^ Huge department stores, little convenience shops, book stores, fruit shops, kiosks, etc.

Anyway it's always worth a try!
When bargaining at small stores, please note that the agreed prices are normally cash prices. .If you like to use a credit card, the seller normally wants to add anything up to 8% to the price as a "card fee" etc.^ If you find work in Japan, you're going to want to open up a savings account.

^ You may be told that it's a 50 credit, or 100 credit card, but the magnetic strip is still convinced that it has been used heavily already.

^ Japan is a cash-based society, which means that checks are not used very much, and international credit cards are accepted mainly by hotels and restaurants.

.The fee consists actually of the credit company's commission and also the local sales tax/VAT. Even if you pay cash, you normally don't get an official receipt, as then the seller would have to report & pay their taxes in full.^ The global corporations, in my opinion—you bring body bags back home and you will see a change like you have never seen, in my opinion, and that is a risk that I don't believe China would even anticipate taking.
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^ Most western airlines bury this tax in the cost of the ticket, so you don't know that you're actually paying it.

^ But, when you return home, you will have to pay this tax yourself.

.If you ask for a receipt or "fa piao", you will get it but you may need to pay 2-5% more.^ Sometimes, you may need to take the JR line to one station, walk outside and downstairs to the underground, and then buy another ticket to hop the subway.

^ Anything more than that may need to be stored somewhere while you travel.

^ Some hostels don't care if you stay more than 3 days, if you pay for one day at a time.

What to buy

Popular things to buy include:
  • Jade. .Although it can be hard to know for sure if the item you're buying is real jade or not, some beautiful objects are sold.^ While there are Police Department buidings as we know them in the west, they're less common, and hard to find.

    ^ Be sure to bring some snacks to munch on, because there's not much to buy when you finally get to the departure gates.

    ^ There is still money to be made as an English teacher, but you're really going to have to hustle to find it.

    .Most cities have a specific jade market dealing in jade and other precious stones.
  • Computers.^ Most big train stations have tourist offices, and there are other tourist offices located in each of the big cities.

    .Taiwan is a center of computer design and manufacture, so some places sell original equipment manufacturers' (OEM) items at good rates.^ If you can find a place to stay, then all you need are some good maps, the Walking Guide to Tokyo from one of the FTP sites, and some spending money.

    ^ Some of these rental places also sell their used games for 300-600 yen apiece.

    ^ Firms selling equipment or machinery frequently find it necessary to find a partner willing and able to do some assembly or manufacturing in Taiwan.
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    .In particular Taiwanese companies produce laptop computers under license to international companies and then sell the same items under different brands locally, effectively giving the same quality for much lower prices.^ They see that the Russians are making too much money selling weapons to the PRC and they would like to do the same.
    • MILITARY CAPABILITIES OF THE PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF CHINA 28 January 2010 1:44 UTC commdocs.house.gov [Source type: Original source]

    ^ A computer animation house that has produced a number of TV ads for different companies, some presentations for a couple of the local theme parks, and is listed in the closing credits for the new American Batman cartoon series.

    ^ Private industrial firms are major purchasers of Japanese systems because of their lower selling price and good after-sales service.
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    .Desktop computers and components however tend to be the same price in Taiwan as in other areas of the world, though peripherals such as cables and adapters tend to be noticeably cheaper.^ In fact, the production of personal computers and related peripherals has grown so rapidly that Taiwan is now the world's leading supplier of scanners, mice, motherboards and modems and now accounts for one quarter of the world market for 8 inch silicon wafers.
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    ^ Taiwan is the world's largest supplier of computer monitors.
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    ^ E. Health information As in many other tropical and sub-tropical areas, tap water in Taiwan should be boiled before drinking.
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    .If you're buying domestic it's best to go to tourist hangouts to buy your stuff as you might be saddled with Chinese documentation otherwise.^ Otherwise, you need to buy a ticket.

    ^ When you have your ticket, go to the ticket gates.

    ^ The best approach is to go to your local library and get a copy of the Tokyo area yellow pages.

    Also, notebooks are typically only available with a Chinese and English keyboard.
  • Lingzhi (靈芝). A type of bracket fungus that is often used as a Chinese herb. It supposedly has many health benefits with an apparent absence of side effects, earning it a high reputation in East Asian countries and making it rather expensive. Taiwanese lingzhi is particularly famous for being of the highest quality.
  • Tea. .Taiwan is particularly famous for its oolong tea(烏龍茶) and this is available in at many tea shops.^ Foreign visitors should not overlook the fragrant teas for which Taiwan is justly famous.
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    Tea tasting in Chinese culture is akin to wine tasting in Western culture and you will find many grades of this same type of tea, with different methods of treating the tea leaves.
.Note: In order to protect the environment, a government policy rules that plastic bags cannot be given freely at stores in Taiwan, but have to be bought (at a flat rate of NT$1) - bakeries being an exception as the items need to be hygienically wrapped.^ Import Licenses Taiwan continues to maintain an import licensing system, but the number of items requiring import licenses is being gradually reduced.
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^ The government permitted free debate within the confines of the legislature, but jailed dissidents who were either labeled as supporters of Chinese communism or Taiwan independence.
  • Exploring Chinese History :: Database Catalog :: Biographical Database :: Republic of China (Taiwan)- (1949- Present) 28 January 2010 1:44 UTC www.ibiblio.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Further, Taiwan law stipulates that expropriation can be based only on national defense needs, and that "reasonable" compensation shall be given.
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Re-useable canvas and nylon bags are sold at most supermarkets.
Stinky tofu
Undoubtedly the most infamous Taiwanese delicacy, stinky tofu (臭豆腐 chòudòufu) is fermented tofu with a strong odor often likened to rotting garbage. .It's usually sold only by outdoor stalls, as the smell would overwhelm most restaurants, but if you can hold your nose long enough to eat it, the taste is quite mild — but with distinct earthy overtones that many visitors find off-putting.^ Since drinking is such an important activity, many strange and beneficial deals can be made at a bar or other drinking establishment if you're lucky or wait long enough.

^ But if you're at a gaijin house, or an older apartment, you may find that there're too many people competing for the shower, or that there's no hot water during the winter.

^ When you get your plane ticket, you'll want to arrive at Narita Airport, if you plan on spending most of your time in Tokyo.

It's most commonly eaten fried, but for extra Fear Factor points, find some mala hotpot with stinky tofu and duck blood.
Taiwanese beef noodle soup
Taiwanese beef noodle soup
Lemon aiyu jelly
Lemon aiyu jelly
.Generally speaking, the foods of Taiwan are derived from mainland Chinese cuisines.^ Sun Yat-sen remains unique among twentieth-century Chinese leaders for having a high reputation both in mainland China and in Taiwan.
  • Exploring Chinese History :: Database Catalog :: Biographical Database :: Republic of China (Taiwan)- (1949- Present) 28 January 2010 1:44 UTC www.ibiblio.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ The aircraft May-ling evacuated them to Taiwan on the same day, forever removing them from the Chinese mainland.
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^ Chiang Ching-kuo followed his father and the retreating Nationalist forces to Taiwan after the Nationalists lost control of mainland China to the Communists in the Chinese Civil War.
  • Exploring Chinese History :: Database Catalog :: Biographical Database :: Republic of China (Taiwan)- (1949- Present) 28 January 2010 1:44 UTC www.ibiblio.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.It is possible to find Szechuan food, Hunan food, Beifang food, Cantonese food and almost every other Chinese cuisine on the island.^ If you can find a gaijin house, you can try to keep your expenses down to 4000 yen a day (1600 for the lousy apartment, the rest for food and other expenses.

^ G. Food Chinese cuisine ranks among the best in the world, and there is no better place to sample it in all its infinite variety than in Taiwan.
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^ However, in the Chinese world, almost nobody uses the Mandarin version Sun Yixian, nor the Cantonese version Sun Yat-sen.
  • Exploring Chinese History :: Database Catalog :: Biographical Database :: Republic of China (Taiwan)- (1949- Present) 28 January 2010 1:44 UTC www.ibiblio.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

Taiwanese renditions of these cuisines tend to be somewhat greasy, though, and completely authentic mainland cuisines are rare. This is especially true for Cantonese cuisine, as demonstrated by the lack of Cantonese speakers on the island. .The Taiwanese are also passionately in love with eggs and seafood, as you will discover during your stay on the island.^ Assuming that you plan on staying for a few months, you should consider getting business cards printed with your address in Japan, both in English and Japanese.

^ Airlines:     It's assumed that if you are only staying in Japan less than a month, that you have already booked your return flight.

^ So, when you meet someone for the first time, it's standard to hand over your card -- either during a job interview, at a nightclub, or a conversation house.

Fruits are another famous part of Taiwanese food. A wide range of fruits can be found at local fruit shops and stations. The subtropical climate allows different fruits to grow nicely. .Actually you can find almost every kind of fruits you can think of in Taiwan.^ It's not easy to find a good apartment that you can afford, in Tokyo, that you actually want to live in.

Taiwan also has many of its own local specialties. A few found island wide include:
  • Beef noodles (牛肉麵 niúròu miàn), noodle soup with chunks of meltingly soft stewed beef and a dash of pickles
  • Oyster omelet (蚵仔煎 kézǎi jiān), made from eggs, oysters and the leaves of a local chrysanthemum, topped with sweet red sauce
  • Aiyu jelly (愛玉 àiyù), made from the seeds of a local fig and usually served on ice — sweet, cool and refreshing on a hot day
  • Taiwan Sausage (香腸 xiāngcháng), usually made from pork, it is a modified version of the Cantonese laap cheong (臘腸) which has been emulsified and is much sweeter in taste. .Unlike laap cheong, which is almost always eaten with rice, Taiwanese xiangchang is usually eaten on its own with some garlic.
  • Taiwanese Orange (柳丁 liŭdīng) is a type of citrus fruit which is similar to usual oranges, except that the skin and flesh tend to look more yellowish like lemon.^ By flashing this, and looking like he's going to do a write-up on some activity, he could get into museums, rides, and other stuff for free.

    Unlike lemon, it is usually quite sweet.
  • Taiwanese Porridge (粥 zhōu in Mandarin, 糜 beh in Taiwanese) is rice porridge cooked with sweet potato. It is usually eaten with several different dishes.
.Most cities and towns in Taiwan are famous for special foods because of the Taiwanese passion for food and influences from many different countries.^ Western food is gaining in popularity, as can be seen from the many western-style restaurants and foreign fast food chains that have set up branches in Taiwan's large cities in recent years.
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^ The Party's most salient policy difference with the KMT has been the controversial issue of Taiwan independence.
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For example, Ilan is famous for its mochi, a sticky rice snack often flavored with sesame, peanuts or other flavorings. Yonghe, a suburb of Taipei, is famous for its soy milk and breakfast foods. .Taichung is famous for its sun cakes (太陽餅 tàiyáng bǐng), a kind of sweet stuffed pastry and the best place to buy some is arguably Taiyang Tang (太陽堂) along Freedom Road (自由路), where the pastry was supposedly invented.^ So, when you are buying something, look for a tray of some kind.

In Chiayi, it's square cookies, also called cubic pastry, crispy layered cookies cut into squares and sprinkled liberally with sesame seeds. .Tainan is particularly famous among the Taiwanese for its abundance of good food and should be a stop for all gourmands.^ Vietnamese, Thai, Indian, Malaysian, Korean and Japanese food are all big favorites with the city's residents, with the latter two being particularly popular.
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The most famous dish is arguably the coffin bread (棺材板). .Virtually every city has its own famous specialties; many Taiwanese tourists will visit other cities on the island simply to try the local foods and then return home.^ You can come to Japan on some other visa status (although temporary tourist is the least desired form) and try to find a company to sponsor you.

^ If you can find a gaijin house, you can try to keep your expenses down to 4000 yen a day (1600 for the lousy apartment, the rest for food and other expenses.

^ However, he has stated that his actions were also based on the premise that a Chinese identity and a Taiwanese identity are ultimately incompatible, a notion that is very controversial on the island, even among supporters of localization.
  • Exploring Chinese History :: Database Catalog :: Biographical Database :: Republic of China (Taiwan)- (1949- Present) 28 January 2010 1:44 UTC www.ibiblio.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

Taiwan also has remarkably good bakery items. .Most specialize in sweet Chinese pastries or Western pastries adjusted to local tastes, but look out for We Care bakeries which also offer Western options such as whole wheat loaves, sour breads and ciabatta.^ Temporary Tourist:     For most western countries, if you are just planning on visiting the Japan for a few days, you don't have to do anything special.

Places to eat

If you're on a budget, the cheapest food can be found in back-alley noodle shops and night market stalls, where you can get a filling bowl of noodles for around $35-70.
.The Taiwanese love to snack and even many restaurants advertise xiaochi (小吃), literally "small eats", the Taiwanese equivalent of Cantonese dim sum.^ The hotel will also have a public bath, tv room, vending machines, small locker for your street clothes, a sleeping robe, and maybe even a little restaurant.

.There are also the standard fast food places such as McDonalds (a standard Big Mac Meal costs $115), KFC and MOS Burger.^ To date most franchise operations have been fast food restaurants such as MacDonalds, Kentucky Fried Chicken, TGIF, Pizza Hut, Burger King, etc.
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^ G. Food Chinese cuisine ranks among the best in the world, and there is no better place to sample it in all its infinite variety than in Taiwan.
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.In addition there are large numbers of convenience stores (such as 7-11) that sell things like tea eggs, sandwiches, bento boxes and drinks.^ Otherwise, there's a chance that things like your electric razor may run noisier and hotter than normal.

^ There is a magnetic strip within the card, which is used to store the actual number of credits remaining.

^ Department Stores: There are over 50 department stores on Taiwan, concentrated in the large cities.
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.Night markets are also a good place to try some delicious local Taiwanese fare at attractive prices.^ If you can find a place to stay, then all you need are some good maps, the Walking Guide to Tokyo from one of the FTP sites, and some spending money.

^ If you want a second-hand bicycle or VCR, trying visiting the backsides of apartment complexes some night.

^ So, the only good place to get phone cards with anime designs are at Animate stores, and some other places that carry paraphenalia.

.Examples would be the Shilin Night Market in Taipei and the Liouho Night Market in Kaohsiung, each of which has its own special dishes not to be missed.^ These chain stores combine the advantages of central purchasing (nearly all operate their own central warehouses) with product specialization and are gaining market share rapidly.
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Etiquette

.As with Chinese cuisine elsewhere, food in Taiwan is generally eaten with chopsticks and served on large plates placed at the center of the table.^ A new opposition party, the Chinese New Party consisting mainly of second generation "mainlanders" who have grown up in Taiwan, broke off from the KMT in 1993.
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^ G. Food Chinese cuisine ranks among the best in the world, and there is no better place to sample it in all its infinite variety than in Taiwan.
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.Unlike in the West, however, a serving spoon might not accompany the dishes, and instead guests will use their own chopsticks to transfer food to their plates.^ Interim Regulations of the People's Republic of China Concerning the Assignment and Transfer of the Right to the Use of the State-owned Land in the Urban Areas .

.Some people unaccustomed to this way of eating may consider this unhygienic, though it is usually quite safe.^ The listings may be old, but you'll get some more addresses this way, and you can ask these schools if they can refer you to other schools that also have job openings currently.

.However, those who prefer to use a separate utensil for serving have the option of requesting communal chopsticks (公筷 gongkuai), and can gently encourage friends to use them if they do not automatically do so.^ Because U.S interest rates tend to be lower than those offered through Taiwan's EXIMBANK, however, this resource is not heavily used by U.S. exporters.
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.The usual traditional Chinese taboos when eating with chopsticks apply in Taiwan as well.^ The local Taiwan cuisine and traditional Buddhist vegetarian restaurants are also well represented.
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For instance, do not stick your chopsticks straight up or into your bowl of rice. This is reminiscent of incense sticks at a temple, and has connotations of wishing death upon those around you. .When putting down chopsticks, either place them on the provided porcelain chopstick rest (at fancier restaurants) or rest the chopsticks across the top of your bowl.^ Face the plumbing, drop your pants, squat down over the porclean bowl, and grab 'the grunt bar' (the water pipe running to the floor.

^ If you can find a gaijin house, you can try to keep your expenses down to 4000 yen a day (1600 for the lousy apartment, the rest for food and other expenses.

^ Either memorize these phrases, or write them down on a separate piece of paper that you can carry in your hand along with your map and/or train ticket.

Also, do not use your chopsticks to spear your food or move bowls and plates.

Dietary restrictions

All Mahayana Buddhists, which account for the majority of adherents in Taiwan, aspire to be pure vegetarian in deference to the Buddha's teaching of non-violence and compassion. So, vegetarian restaurants (called su-shi 素食 tsan-ting 餐廳 in Mandarin, and often identified with the 卍 symbol) can be found in abundance all over the island, and they run from cheap buffet style to gourmet and organic. .Buffet styled restaurants (called 自助餐, which means "Serve Yourself Restaurant") are common in almost every neighborhood in large cities, and unlike the 'all-you-can-eat' buffets (which charge a set price, usually ranging from $250-350 including dessert and coffee/tea), the cost is estimated by the weight of the food on your plate.^ US$7.00 a night puts a roof over your head, and you'll be four blocks from City Hall.

^ When you get back home, you should be able to convert your money back without being charged a second time.

^ Keep your passport with you at all times.

.Rice (there is usually a choice of brown or white) is charged separately, but soup or cold tea is free and you can refill as many times as you like.^ There aren't many bargains left to be found here, and if you want inexpensive electronics or clothing, you're better off visiting Taiwan or Korea.

^ But if you're at a gaijin house, or an older apartment, you may find that there're too many people competing for the shower, or that there's no hot water during the winter.

^ The problem with teaching in a small town is that there is little to do in the evenings, and you will feel like a real outsider if you can't speak Japanese.

$90-$120 will buy you a good sized, nutritious meal.
.However, if you cannot find a veggie restaurant, don't fret.^ However, the bigger stations have maps on the wall, showing you where you are, and how to find the exit you want.

^ However, if you don't have a map, or you can't find the station name you want on the signs, go to the manned ticket window at the ticket gates, and say "Sumimasen, 'station' wa nanban des ka?"

^ And, although some restaurants may have non-smoking areas, don't be too surprised if someone lights up next to you, anyway.

.Taiwanese people are very flexible and most restaurants will be happy to cook you up something to suit your requirements.^ Most working visas can be extended at least once, and sometimes you can get up to 3 extensions before your passport is stamped with "Final Extension."

^ You need to contact your local consulate to get the paperwork for this visa, and to determine the requirements for receiving it.

^ As always, play things smart (and buy from the yakuza if you want something for your own consumption.

The following sentences in Mandarin might be helpful: 我吃素 (Wo chi su) - I'm vegetarian, 我不吃肉 (Wo bu chi rou) - I don't eat meat. .However, as Mandarin is a tonal language, you might need to say both, plus practice your acting skills to get yourself understood.^ Assuming that you plan on staying for a few months, you should consider getting business cards printed with your address in Japan, both in English and Japanese.

^ Otherwise, try to get your travel agent to book your hotel in advance (which saves you the long-distance phone bill if you do it yourself.

^ If you want to meet some Japanese (and practice your language lessons on them), and any number of foreign English teachers, conversation houses are the places to be.

Good luck! NB: If a restaurant refuses your order, don't push the issue. .The reason will not be an unwillingness to accommodate your request, but because the basic ingredients of their dishes may include chicken broth or pork fat.^ If you've got everything packed and ready to go: You can use a notebook computer on the flight, but Walkmans are prohibited, and you may be requested to not play your GameBoy.

.Although vegetarian restaurants in Taiwan do not aspire to vegan principles, due to the fact that Taiwanese do not have a tradition of eating dairy products, almost all non-dessert dishes at Chinese style veggie restaurants will actually be vegan.^ And, although some restaurants may have non-smoking areas, don't be too surprised if someone lights up next to you, anyway.

Ensure that your dish does not contain eggs, however.
Drinks vending machine in Taiwan
Drinks vending machine in Taiwan
As Taiwan is a subtropical island with the south part in the tropics, it cannot hurt to drink a lot, especially during summertime. .Drink vending machines can be found virtually everywhere and are filled with all kinds of juices, tea and coffee drinks, soy milk and mineral water.^ There are stores of all kinds, everywhere.

^ There are three kinds of ticket vending machines: Fixed denomination: This machine only sells one value of ticket.

^ Coffee and tea are free, drinks are cheaper than in a bar, and some places also serve munchies and alcohol.

Water

As a general rule, with the exception of Kaohsiung, tap water in Taiwan is safe for drinking after boiling. Any water or ice you are served in restaurants will already have been processed. Water fountains in Taiwan always incorporate filters, and they can be found in practically every lodge or hotel as well as (for example) larger museums and Taipei MRT stations. .You can refill and reuse your bottles at these fountains as well.^ Again, most of these guys don't speak English, so you may have to be a little creative to get your question understood.

^ These services can help you find an apartment, as well as providing job listings, fax and typewriter services, and message boards.

^ Either memorize these phrases, or write them down on a separate piece of paper that you can carry in your hand along with your map and/or train ticket.

.If you can't find one, then you should buy bottled water.^ Bring a water bottle, or buy one here.

^ Sometimes, you may need to take the JR line to one station, walk outside and downstairs to the underground, and then buy another ticket to hop the subway.

^ If you can find a place to stay, then all you need are some good maps, the Walking Guide to Tokyo from one of the FTP sites, and some spending money.

Note that in Kaohsiung, most people do not drink the tap water, even after filtering or boiling, since the water contains trace amounts of arsenic that is detrimental to health. .Whether the trace amounts are dangerous or not is debatable, especially if you're just passing through, but the locals obtain potable water using pumps that look like gasoline pumps that are strewn throughout the residential areas.^ If you just want to spend money on silly stuff, go to a grocery store and look around.

^ And if you're looking for a particular address, you'll notice that the buildings aren't numbered sequentially (rather, it's in the order that they were constructed on that street.

^ The approach to use here is to look to the side, say "Wakerimasen" -- I don't understand you -- and just keep walking.

.For tourists, most hotels would provide 2 bottles of mineral water in each room and you should use that as your drinking water.^ Most working visas can be extended at least once, and sometimes you can get up to 3 extensions before your passport is stamped with "Final Extension."

^ You should have your destination written down on paper, at least in Hiragana, and ask your driver (preferably, in Japanese) to tell you when you have reached where you are going.

^ When you get your plane ticket, you'll want to arrive at Narita Airport, if you plan on spending most of your time in Tokyo.

.If that is not enough, there are many 24 hours convenience stores around so you can get additional bottled water from there.^ But if you're at a gaijin house, or an older apartment, you may find that there're too many people competing for the shower, or that there's no hot water during the winter.

^ And most places will let you store your big bags there while you go on a short trip for a few days (if you want to travel light at that time.

^ There will be a Marui (OIOI) store on the opposite corner, depending on which end of the station you exited.

Alcohol

Traditional alcoholic drinks in Taiwan are very strong. Kaoliang (高粱酒) is the most famous alcoholic drink. A distilled grain liquor, it is extremely strong, usually 140 proof or more, and often drunk straight.
Taiwan also produces many types of Shaoxing (紹興酒), rice wine, which are considered by many as being some of the best in the world.
Taiwanese people enjoy beer on ice. A wide variety of imported beers are available, but the standard is Taiwan Beer (台灣啤酒), produced by a former government monopoly. It is brewed with fragrant penglai rice in addition to barley giving it a distinctive flavor.
Pearl milk tea and pudding milk tea, Chiayi
Pearl milk tea and pudding milk tea, Chiayi
Taiwan's specialty teas are High Mountain Oolong (高山烏龍, Gao-shan wulong) - a fragrant, light tea, and Tie Guan-yin (鐵觀音) - a dark, rich brew. .Enjoying this tea drank in the traditional way using a very small teapot and tiny cups is a experience you should not miss.^ You may find yen denomination travellers checks to be a very good way to convert money prior to going to Japan.

^ Either way, make sure you have a universal power adapter, and an extra battery just in case the main battery dies after a few months of use.

This way of taking tea is called lao ren cha - 'old people's tea', and the name is derived from the fact that only the elderly traditionally had the luxury of time to relax and enjoy tea in this way. .Check the small print when visiting a traditional tea house though: in addition to the tea itself, you may be charged a cover (茶水費, literally "tea-water fee") for the elaborate process of preparing it as well as for any nibbles served on the side.^ You will be charged a conversion fee.

^ You may even get a TV, tea warmer, teapot, and tea.

^ So, you may want to prepare yourself for a bit of travelling.

.One should also try Lei cha (擂茶; léi chá) a tasty and nourishing Hakka Chinese tea-based beverage consisting of a mix ground tea leaves and grain.^ If you have an open-ended return ticket and are trying to leave near one of the big holiday rush periods, you're in for lots of headaches.

Some stores specialize in this product and allows one to grind their own lei cha.
Pearl milk tea (珍珠奶茶 zhēnzhū nǎichá), aka "bubble tea" or "boba tea", is milky tea with chewy balls of tapioca added, drunk through an over sized straw. .Invented in Taiwan in the early 1980s and a huge Asia-wide craze in the 1990s, it's not quite as popular as it once was but can still be found at nearly every coffee/tea shop.^ While karaoke is not as popular as it once was, it's still a standard pastime on a Friday or Saturday night.

Look for a shop where it is freshly made.
.The cafe culture has hit Taiwan in a big way, and in addition to an abundance of privately owned cafes, all the major chains, such as Starbucks, have a multitude of branches throughout major towns and cities.^ Local trains owned by JR or private companies cover the inner cities.

^ Police Boxes are located near most train stations, and at major intersections throughout the city.

^ Each NTT branch throughout Japan has its own set of card designs.

Soft drinks

Taiwan is a great place for fruit drinks. Small fruit-juice bars make them fresh on the spot and are experts at creating fruit-juice cocktails (non-alcoholic, of course). zong-he - mixed - is usually a sweet and sour combination and mu-gwa niou-nai is iced papaya milk. .If you don't want ice (though it is safe in Taiwan, even at road side vendors) say, chu bing and no sugar - wu tang.^ Also, you can mail back home whatever you don't want to hand carry.

^ There aren't many bargains left to be found here, and if you want inexpensive electronics or clothing, you're better off visiting Taiwan or Korea.

^ The approach to use here is to look to the side, say "Wakerimasen" -- I don't understand you -- and just keep walking.

Soy milk, or doujiang (豆漿), is a great treat. Try it hot or cold. Savoury soy milk is a traditional Taiwanese breakfast dish. It is somewhat of an acquired taste as vinegar is added to curdle the milk. Both sweet and savory soy milk are often ordered with you-tiao, or deep fried dough crullers.
.There are a lot of pseudo health drinks in Taiwanese supermarkets and convenience stores.^ They are not good places for staying more than a few days, and there is no place to store lots of belongings or anime purchases.

Look out for asparagus juice and lavender milk tea for example.
The Grand Hotel, Taipei
The Grand Hotel, Taipei
Taiwan doesn't sleep - just look at the number of 24-hour stores out there. But since you have to....
.For the budget-minded, there are hostels in Taipei and most other sizeable cities.^ Before you come to Japan, if this is the first time, there are a number of things to keep in mind: Japan is a very modernized country, and most of the preconceptions you have will probably be wrong.

^ Most big train stations have tourist offices, and there are other tourist offices located in each of the big cities.

Camping is also available in many areas.
.Motels (汽車旅館) can be easily found in suburbs of major cities.^ Post Offices can easily be found in all cities.

Despite the name, these have little if anything to do with the cheap functional hotels that use the name elsewhere; in Taiwan, motels are intended for romantic trysts and can be quite extravagant in decor and facitilies. Many feature enormous baths with massage jets, separate massage showers, marble tiles, and so forth. Suites come with flat screen TVs as well as centrally controlled sound systems. .During the daytime, most offer "rests" (休息) of a few hours, and indeed check-in times for overnight stays (住宿) can be as late at 10 PM. Taichung is considered the motel-capital of Taiwan.^ Working:     The most coveted visa status if you're trying to stay here for any length of time, and make money.

Taiwanese hotels range in quality from seedy to very luxurious. Desipite the complexities of doing business with both mainland China and Taiwan, most Western hotel chains operate in Taiwan such as Sheraton, Westin and Hyatt. Also, there are plenty of five-star hotels around. .Keep in mind, however, that many of the international hotels tend to be outrageously expensive, while comparable and much cheaper accommodation is usually available in the same vicinity.^ Japan is a cash-based society, which means that checks are not used very much, and international credit cards are accepted mainly by hotels and restaurants.

^ Keep in mind, Japan is a big, busy, expensive place.

^ The better schools will usually be much more expensive -- which is a problem if you're studying on a student or cultural visa.

.For example, the airport hotel at CKS International charges about three or four times as much as a hotel in Taoyuan which is a half hour cab ride away.^ The rules state that you have to study pretty much full-time, and can not work more that 20 hours a week.

^ Japan is a cash-based society, which means that checks are not used very much, and international credit cards are accepted mainly by hotels and restaurants.

Taxi drivers and tourist offices are invaluable resources for finding cheaper hotels.
Many hotels in Taiwan have both Chinese and Western names, which can differ radically. .Find out and bring along the Chinese name (in Chinese characters), as locals will usually not be able to identify the English ones.^ Contact your local consulate to find out what's necessary if you want to apply from outside of Japan.

^ If you want to find work as an English teacher, take a course in English as a Second Language (ESL,) or one of the other similar programs.

^ There is only one studio listed with the Tokyo Tourist Information Center (TIC) that is identified as conducting tours in English, and it's one that I've never heard of.

.Especially when you visit the regions less traveled by westerners (mostly because there is no business there), don't be shy to walk in on the more pricey hotels, especially off-season.^ Business Hotel:     This is a more upscale option.

^ There aren't many bargains left to be found here, and if you want inexpensive electronics or clothing, you're better off visiting Taiwan or Korea.

^ The approach to use here is to look to the side, say "Wakerimasen" -- I don't understand you -- and just keep walking.

.The Ceasar, the Chateau and the Howard Beach Resort at Kenting, for example, located at one of the nicest beaches of tropical Taiwan, can be of exceptional value if you stay there during wintertime, as the rooms not yet let for the night are offered far below their normal price at last minute.^ But if you're at a gaijin house, or an older apartment, you may find that there're too many people competing for the shower, or that there's no hot water during the winter.

^ In a Japanese house, there will be a pair of toilet slippers that you are to wear only in the toilet room.

^ Youth hostels usually require you to leave after 3 days (if you stay one night elsewhere, you can come back for another three nights.

.Hotel beds in Taiwan are generally much harder than in the West because of the old Asian tradition to sleep on a wood board.^ Women are still treated as sex-objects, sex is much more open than in the West, and racism is a blatant problem (especially for Koreans and blacks.

.Modern mattresses can be found in most hotels, but only in the most upscale Western style hotels will you find beds in a real western style.^ However, the only real anime cards sold most places in each city are for Chibi Maruko Chan .

^ If you are planning on finding work once you enter the country, keep in mind that working visas are issued only to university graduates.

^ Pay phones can be found near any train station, or convenience store, although it's not always easy to find an international phone if you need one (look inside hotels, and near train stations.

Learn

Mandarin Chinese

.Some universities in Taiwan have Chinese Promoting Programs (華語文推廣中心) that offers Chinese lessons to foreigners who wish to live in Taiwan or to learn Mandarin Chinese as their second or foreign language.^ If you want to meet some Japanese (and practice your language lessons on them), and any number of foreign English teachers, conversation houses are the places to be.

^ If you want to find work as an English teacher, take a course in English as a Second Language (ESL,) or one of the other similar programs.

The romanisation system taught here nowadays is Hanyu Pinyin, whereas in the past they taught Zhuyin, or BoPoMoFo. The writing system taught is Traditional Chinese.

Martial arts

.There are many styles of kung fu taught in Taiwan, largely by masters who came here with the Kuomintang in the late 1940's.^ There aren't many bargains left to be found here, and if you want inexpensive electronics or clothing, you're better off visiting Taiwan or Korea.

Styles include Ba Gua, Tai Chi, Wing Chun, Praying Mantis, Shway Shiao and various weapons systems. .Many of the students are westerners in these classes, which has led to the rise of several NHB Allegra [32] schools, as well as Ju Jitsu and Aikido from Japan.^ Take as many as they give you -- these tissues are intended to be used in the public toilets, and it's one of the really good bargains in Japan.

.Some of the more famous teachers will provide you with the paperwork needed to extend a student visa twice.^ Most working visas can be extended at least once, and sometimes you can get up to 3 extensions before your passport is stamped with "Final Extension."

^ You need to contact your local consulate to get the paperwork for this visa, and to determine the requirements for receiving it.

^ Any travel guide for Japan that you buy will have at least some useful phrases in it to help you get around more easily.

Taekwondo is also extremely popular and is often a mandatory part of school children's physical education.

Work

The majority of travellers who work in Taiwan pick up temporary jobs teaching English. .Jobs teaching other languages (mainly European or Japanese) do exist but have a much smaller proportion of the market.^ Some newcomers have gotten jobs, both teaching and modeling, others have gotten dates, and most have made useful contacts this way.

.Job requirements - in finding employment with a language school, experience, teaching qualifications and references are not required but obviously help.^ These services can help you find an apartment, as well as providing job listings, fax and typewriter services, and message boards.

.On paper, a big issue is also made about accents, with the North American English accent being heavily favored over British, Australian and South African accents in many language schools' sales marketing.^ Contact a big university, and they may be able to put you in contact with the school you want, or look in the Yellow Pages under language schools in case KEN School is listed there.

^ But times have changed, and most English schools in the big cities are being much more picky -- demanding certification in an ESL (English as a Second Language) program at the very least.

^ You don't necessarily have to speak the language to survive in Japan, because many signs are in English, and a fair number of people have at least studied English in school.

However, in practice, many schools that advertise 'American English' and claim that their teachers are all from Canada or the USA, actually employ teachers from anywhere. Age is a factor, with applicants in their 20s seemingly being preferred. .More than anything, appearance is probably the major factor in finding employment with most schools - Do you 'look Western'? - and reliability and turning up on time for work is then the major factor for keeping your job.^ Keep your passport with you at all times.

^ Apartments:     If you find work, you'll probably want your own place.

^ When you get your plane ticket, you'll want to arrive at Narita Airport, if you plan on spending most of your time in Tokyo.

.Therefore, if you look the part, it is very easy to find a school willing to take you on for at least a few days.^ Contact a big university, and they may be able to put you in contact with the school you want, or look in the Yellow Pages under language schools in case KEN School is listed there.

^ Others are fly-by-nights that take your money and shut their doors a few days later.

^ And most places will let you store your big bags there while you go on a short trip for a few days (if you want to travel light at that time.

This 'look Western' point has quite a bearing. Unfortunately, Taiwan is hardly a great promoter of equal opportunities. .In many schools there is a prejudice against teachers applying for jobs who are not of white Caucasian appearance, seen as the typical Western appearance in Asian countries.^ But, if you want to stay longer, get a job, or enter the country as a student, you do need to apply for some kind of visa.

This is independent of whether or not the teacher has relevant teaching ability and citizenship of one of the permitted ARC countries. .Many parents who send their children to schools to be taught English expect the teacher to look like they are from the U.S., Canada, the UK, Australia, and so on, and so the decision on the part of the school managers is mainly about economics.^ Contact a big university, and they may be able to put you in contact with the school you want, or look in the Yellow Pages under language schools in case KEN School is listed there.

^ You don't necessarily have to speak the language to survive in Japan, because many signs are in English, and a fair number of people have at least studied English in school.

^ Of course, what you really want is one of the big bookstores, like Kinokuniya, that carry just about everything, because they will have the widest selection of manga.

For those affected by this, it's a sad fact of Taiwan that is unlikely to change in the near future. Good employers without such prejudiced requirements do exist, but greater perseverance is needed when looking for them.
.It is illegal to work without a work permit and an ARC (or Alien Residency Permit), and legal work officially requires a university degree and usually a long (two month+) application process.^ However, you must have an University degree to receive a working visa.

However, illegal employment is easy to find with many school managers being willing to pay under the table for short durations. Be aware that if caught or reported, you risk criminal charges and could be deported. The government tends to waver from being very lax on this issue under one administration to suddenly taking action under the next; but remember that it only takes one disgruntled student to report you and have you fined and deported. Consider your options carefully!
.The rules for getting an ARC do change often and each administrative part of Taiwan has its own ways of handling them, so it is best to check the pages of the website Forumosa [33] and find out what the experiences of others are in your area.^ Just go through the motions, and continue on your own way when it is over.

^ Contact your local consulate to find out what's necessary if you want to apply from outside of Japan.

^ If you can find a gaijin house, you can try to keep your expenses down to 4000 yen a day (1600 for the lousy apartment, the rest for food and other expenses.

.Keep in mind, that you can only get an ARC for English teaching if you are a 'citizen of a native English speaking country'. Taiwan's government defines these countries to be only the U.S., Canada, the UK, Australia, New Zealand, Ireland and South Africa.^ Keep in mind that you can't convert coins.

^ The money is not bad, but a number of these workers are in the country illegally, and there is a slowly mounting pressure for the government to clamp down on them.

^ The thing to keep in mind is that after a while, you'll find yourself going through 1000 yen bills rather quickly.

.Almost all teachers apply for an ARC through their employers only after starting work and it is tied to their ongoing employment with that school.^ Gaijin House:     This is the only long-term option if you can't get an apartment through your work.

Therefore, if the teacher wishes to leave their employment, they will have to quickly find an alternative employer or lose their ARC and hence be required to leave Taiwan. .Also, very few schools will arrange an ARC without at least a year-long contract being signed.^ But times have changed, and most English schools in the big cities are being much more picky -- demanding certification in an ESL (English as a Second Language) program at the very least.

^ Some schools have an iron-clad contract requiring you to pay for a full year in advance, with no refunds.

Frankly, with all this inflexibility, it's no wonder so many teachers opt for the non-legal route. That and tax evasion.
.A lot of the illegal teaching work that the majority of English teachers partake in is simply through private student tuition with payment being cash-in-hand.^ I haven't found one post office that has English speakers working it, so you just have to bluff your way through the process of mailing packages.

^ If you want to find work as an English teacher, take a course in English as a Second Language (ESL,) or one of the other similar programs.

You can find a lot of private students around universities that have a Chinese-teaching department - look for the areas where all the foreign students will be and check the noticeboards. .Because the majority of adult private students want to practise English conversation, you won't need to have any Chinese ability.^ Because you won't be able to afford food.

^ If you are young, blond, outgoing, and attractive, you'll probably be able to get a job within a week if not less, and you don't need a university degree because you won't get sponsored for a working visa this way.

^ Otherwise, when you change lines, you need to hand in your first ticket, follow the signs directing you to the train line you want, and the buy a second ticket.

.However, it is definitely a selling point and, if you do have Chinese-speaking ability, it's worthwhile mentioning that in any advertising of your services.^ You can have your resume printed up for you, bilingually, at any of the Information Services.

^ When filling out the Immigrations form, your "Point of Departure" will be the airport you departed from, and your "Point of Arrival" will be the airport you are going to in Japan (probably Narita.

^ At the same time, word had gone out that Japan was a good place to come to for easy money -- the only qualification you needed was the ability to speak English.

.Also, once you have some regular students, remember that in Taiwan, as in most Asian countries, 'connections' or 'guanxi' are very important - if your students like you, they will in all likelihood recommend you to their family and friends.^ That's where you are expected to put your money, and that's where they'll put your change.

^ Check with your nearest embassy, but for most western countries (including England, Canada, Australia, and the U.S,) you can just enter Japan and stay up to 90 days (This is called "a temporary tourist visa."

^ Most working visas can be extended at least once, and sometimes you can get up to 3 extensions before your passport is stamped with "Final Extension."

.Teaching English in Taiwan can be lucrative, as the salaries are very high compared to the cost of living, typically ranging $500-650 per hour before deductions in most language schools, with anything between $500-1000 per hour being negotiable for private students.^ But times have changed, and most English schools in the big cities are being much more picky -- demanding certification in an ESL (English as a Second Language) program at the very least.

^ You don't necessarily have to speak the language to survive in Japan, because many signs are in English, and a fair number of people have at least studied English in school.

^ Most foreigners come to Japan to make easy money, usually teaching English.

In the past few years, the flow of would-be teachers into Taiwan has increased dramatically, resulting in stiffer competition for jobs as well as a general drop in wages and this trend may continue. .On top of this, the Taiwanese dollar has been sliding in value over the past five years, meaning you get less and less for your dollar in foreign currency at the end of the month.^ Airlines:     It's assumed that if you are only staying in Japan less than a month, that you have already booked your return flight.

^ Assuming that you plan on staying for a few months, you should consider getting business cards printed with your address in Japan, both in English and Japanese.

^ I don't actually recommend joining the navy just so that you can take your six-month leave here, but if you're already in the military, do everything you can to get stationed here.

.Aside from English-teaching, other common kinds of employment available for mainly native English-speaking travellers include such tid-bits as small acting parts for TV and film, voice talent (video games, dubbing tracks, etc), editing and even writing educational materials.^ The hotel will also have a public bath, tv room, vending machines, small locker for your street clothes, a sleeping robe, and maybe even a little restaurant.

^ Call for directions (yes, they speak English,) or check the Travel Survival Kit .

^ Some of these schools have arrangements where you can make some money back by teaching English part time.

.Many of these will be advertised on billboards in Chinese language-teaching institutes and universities, where there are likely to be many foreign students.^ Contact a big university, and they may be able to put you in contact with the school you want, or look in the Yellow Pages under language schools in case KEN School is listed there.

^ And many of these places really soak their customers for every cent they can get, while treating their employees like shit.

^ The problem with teaching in a small town is that there is little to do in the evenings, and you will feel like a real outsider if you can't speak Japanese.

.If after travelling and living there, you find you are serious about working in Taiwan, the most lucrative employment to be had is if you are employed by a multinational company, perhaps in a high-paying country like the UK, U.S. or Australia, and you are sent across to their office in Taiwan.^ If you work for a company that has a branch office, try to get them to transfer you to Japan.

^ Although there are still a number of quiet little farms, and temples nestled in the mountains, much of the country has been industrialized, and will be like what like you are familiar with at home, but over a greater scale.

^ Most working visas can be extended at least once, and sometimes you can get up to 3 extensions before your passport is stamped with "Final Extension."

.Many foreigners end up doing the same job as their colleagues who were employed in the Taiwan office, but for perhaps 3 or 4 times their pay.^ Your local university will have an office that receives announcements of foreign job listings -- call up information, and track down that office.

^ Other:     There are other jobs that crop up at times, and other sources for job listings.

.
  • Go2TeachEnglish - [34] - teaching English as a Second Language in Taiwan
  • English in Taiwan [35] - Mainly focused on English teachers In Taiwan wanting jobs in Taiwan.^ If you want to meet some Japanese (and practice your language lessons on them), and any number of foreign English teachers, conversation houses are the places to be.

    ^ If you want to find work as an English teacher, take a course in English as a Second Language (ESL,) or one of the other similar programs.

    Rich in resources for teachers and Expats living in visiting Taiwan. Daily updates
  • Taiwan Deal - Jobs resource for teachers and expats living in Taiwan.
Sign of the Taiwan Police
Sign of the Taiwan Police
Taiwan is very safe for tourists, even for women at night. .This is not to say, however, that there is no crime, and you should always exercise caution.^ Please note that if one of the participants are in the United Kingdom, you should select a city there (e.g.
  • The World Clock Meeting Planner 19 September 2009 13:27 UTC www.timeanddate.com [Source type: News]

^ This utility should help you find a convenient time, so that no one has to be up during the middle of the night.
  • The World Clock Meeting Planner 19 September 2009 13:27 UTC www.timeanddate.com [Source type: News]

^ By looking at the train map, you'll see that there is no station marked "Ginza."

In crowded areas such as night markets or festivals, for example, pickpockets are a known problem. However, it is fair to say that the streets of Taiwan are generally very safe and that violent crime and muggings are very rare.
In addition, it is also very unusual to see drunks on the street, day or night.
Like anywhere else in the world, women should be cautious when taking taxis alone late at night. .Although they are generally safe, it's a good idea to arrange to have a friend call you when you get home and to be seen making the arrangements for this by the cab driver.^ This is a great way to meet people, and possibly make friends, if you are on a real tight budget, or have lots of time for travelling.

^ By dialing 0039 and then a country code, you can get an operator in your home country to place the call for you -- costs you 10 yen.

^ AmEx has good exchange rates, and you can use travellers checks to send money to friends in Japan.

.It also helps if a friend sees you being picked up as taxis have visible license numbers.^ This utility should help you find a convenient time, so that no one has to be up during the middle of the night.
  • The World Clock Meeting Planner 19 September 2009 13:27 UTC www.timeanddate.com [Source type: News]

^ If you are making a long-distance call using a phone card, you can see the numbers on the readout decrease rather quickly.

^ You probably won't get to tour the studio (Robert keeps saying that there's nothing to see,) but you might be able to set up a lunch appointment.

.As an additional safety precaution, tell taxi drivers just the street name and section instead of your exact address.^ You should have your destination written down on paper, at least in Hiragana, and ask your driver (preferably, in Japanese) to tell you when you have reached where you are going.

^ If you can, make your bank give you exact addresses for the right locations before you leave.

A Police Station in Taiwan
A Police Station in Taiwan
.Police departments in most jurisdictions have a Foreign Affairs Police unit staffed by English speaking officers.^ Again, most of these guys don't speak English, so you may have to be a little creative to get your question understood.

^ Most foreigners come to Japan to make easy money, usually teaching English.

^ Look for a bank that is friendly, has English-speaking officers, and offers low-cost electronic transfers.

When reporting a major crime, it is advisable to contact the Foreign Affairs unit in addition to officers at the local precinct. Police stations are marked with a red light above the door and display a sign with the word "Police" clearly printed in English. For more information see the National Police Agency website [36].
Foreign victims of a major crime in Taiwan are also advised to report the matter to their government's representative office in Taipei.
Also, remember that you call 110 for police in Taiwan, and 119 for Fire Dept. or Medical Help. .Most of the public telephone booths will allow you to call 110 or 119 for free.^ The Yakusa can be most easily identified by their full-body tattoos, if you see them at the public baths, and by the missing digits from their hands.

^ Make sure that you have the toll-free information phone number for your card company -- to find the nearest office to you, just call that phone number.

.See "Emergency Phone Numbers" section below.^ Single-line, multiple denomination: These machines sell a variety of ticket values, and some of them accept train cards (see the section on Phone and Train Cards.

^ If you are making a long-distance call using a phone card, you can see the numbers on the readout decrease rather quickly.

  • Police: 110
  • Fire/Ambulance: 119
.For those who need assistance in English, the Taiwanese government[37] has a 24-hour toll-free foreigner service hotline at 0800-024-111, which you may call for assistance.^ Sometimes, you may need to take the JR line to one station, walk outside and downstairs to the underground, and then buy another ticket to hop the subway.

^ Otherwise, you can ask for a (free to foreigners) copy at any Tokyo NTT office.

^ Again, most of these guys don't speak English, so you may have to be a little creative to get your question understood.

Natural hazards

.Taiwan often experiences typhoons during the summer months and early fall, especially on the East Coast.^ It's generally best to visit Tokyo are mid-Spring, and early Fall: the winter is cold and damp, the summer is hot and sticky, and it rains heavily inbetween.

^ Sapporo can be beautiful in the winter, but it's also a great place to start a hiking trip from into the mountainous regions farther east during the summer.

Heavy monsoon rainfall also occurs during the summer. Hikers and mountaineers should be sure to consult weather reports before heading into the mountains. A major hazard following heavy rainfall in the mountains is falling rocks caused by the softening of the earth and there are occasional reports of people being killed or injured by these.
Taiwan is also located on the Pacific Ring of Fire, which means that earthquakes are a common occurrence. Most earthquakes are barely noticeable, though the effect may be slightly amplified for those in higher buildings. While the local building codes are extremely strict, general precautions should still be observed during an earthquake, including opening the door for preventing it being jammed, taking cover and checking for gas leaks afterwards.
.Taiwan's wild areas are home to a variety of poisonous snakes, including the bamboo viper, Russel's viper, banded krait, coral snake, Chinese cobra, Taiwan habu, and the so-called "hundred pacer". Precautions against snake bites include making plenty of noise as you hike, wearing long trousers and avoiding overgrown trails.^ And if you wear glasses or contacts, make sure that you bring a spare pair, and/or your prescription.

^ If it's going to be a lengthy call, make sure that you have a second card ready, and stuff it into the slot when you get the warning beep.

^ If you are making a long-distance call using a phone card, you can see the numbers on the readout decrease rather quickly.

.Most snakes are scared of humans, so if you make noise you will give them time to get away.^ Working:     The most coveted visa status if you're trying to stay here for any length of time, and make money.

^ Just make sure you allow yourself plenty of time, if you're trying get to an appointment.

^ And most places will let you store your big bags there while you go on a short trip for a few days (if you want to travel light at that time.

.Walking quietly means that you may suddenly startle them around a corner when you appear, and trigger an attack.^ Sometimes, you may need to take the JR line to one station, walk outside and downstairs to the underground, and then buy another ticket to hop the subway.

^ If any of them are making return trips to the country, you may get them to help you out a little with either filling out the forms, or getting around in the airport.

^ But these do exist, so you just need to look around a little (the Walking Guide will help you out, too.

The Russel's viper, one of the most dangerous snakes in Taiwan, is an exception...it generally prefers to take a stand against threats.

Traffic

Local drivers have a well-deserved reputation for being somewhat reckless. .It is possible (even normal) to obtain a driving license in Taiwan without ever having driven on the roads, and this may be a reason (along with the overcrowded roads) why courteous or defensive driving is definitely not the norm.^ But, this is the easiest money to be made, and you can get big tips from nice people even without having to go to bed with any of them.

The guiding principles seem to be that the right of way belongs to the larger vehicle, i.e. trucks have the right-of-way over cars, cars over motorcycles, motorcycles over people, etc. Despite traffic's chaotic appearance, it is viscerally intuitive to yield the right-of-way to a much larger vehicle barreling towards you. It is advisable to use slow and smooth movements over quick or sudden ones. Local drivers regularly cut in front of moving traffic into spaces that seem too small, try to change lanes regardless of the fact their destination is already full, etc. Be aware that during busy traffic (i.e. nearly always) two-lane roads will spontaneously become three-lane, an orange light will be interpreted as 'speed up', and the smallest moment's pause in oncoming traffic will result in everybody that's waiting trying to turn across it. .Drivers routinely enter a junction when their exit is blocked, and are therefore frequently still there long after the lights change, blocking traffic traveling in other directions.^ And most places will let you store your big bags there while you go on a short trip for a few days (if you want to travel light at that time.

^ Do not forget that traffic travels in the opposite direction than it does in North America.

.Many motorcycle riders also have a tendency to zip through any space, no matter how tiny.^ No matter how lost and alone you feel, there's always someone to turn to for help.

^ If the person you're talking to will answer you when you speak Japanese (no matter how bad it is,) then feel free to keep at it.

^ No matter how much you want to fit in, you won't be able to pull it off.

Also be aware that motorcycles often travel through areas typically considered as pedestrian-only spaces, like the night-markets.
.If you happen to drive a car or a motorcycle, the obvious rule is that if someone turns in front of you, you should be the one to adapt.^ No matter how lost and alone you feel, there's always someone to turn to for help.

To avoid collisions, drivers need to be extremely vigilant for other vehicles creating hazards and always be willing to adjust speed or direction to accommodate. Do not expect drivers to yield way, or respect traffic lights in many areas, especially in central and southern Taiwan. Sounding the horn is the usual way a Taiwanese driver indicates that they do not intend to accommodate a driver trying to encroach on their lane, etc, and does not necessarily imply the anger or criticism, as it does in other countries. .One bright side of Taiwan's chaotic traffic is that drivers tend to have an exceptional awareness of the spatial extents of their vehicle, so that even though it continuously looks like somebody is about to drive straight into you, it's relatively rare that they actually do so.^ Contact a big university, and they may be able to put you in contact with the school you want, or look in the Yellow Pages under language schools in case KEN School is listed there.

^ The common Japanese philosophy holds that you digest food better after a good hot bath in the evening (they don't bathe of shower in the morning, but that is when they do shave.

^ By flashing this, and looking like he's going to do a write-up on some activity, he could get into museums, rides, and other stuff for free.

.Be extra careful when crossing the road, even to the extent of looking both ways on a one-way street.^ Even if you look Japanese, and speak the language flawlessly, people will recognize you as being different from them and treat you that way.

.When crossing at a pedestrian-crossing at a T-junction or crossroads, be aware that when the little green man lights up and you start crossing, motorists will still try to turn right, with or without a green feeder light.^ You can turn down these challenges, but it's a lot more fun to go along with the crowd and try them out, believe me.

^ Do not be surprised if someone comes up to you and starts to talk to you.

^ Cross the street, turn right, and walk another 4 blocks (about 2 sets of signal lights.

.Even on roads where traffic is infrequent and the green light is in your favor, bike-riders are still strongly advised to check the opposite lane.^ If it's an automated gate, follow the crowd to one of the gates that has a green light on the front (wickets with red lights are for people walking the opposite direction.

^ If it's an automatic gate, look for the gates with the green lights on the front, and insert your ticket in the slot -- you won't get your ticket back this time.

Stay healthy

Eating and Drinking

Westerners should be cautious of relatively undercooked food. Many Taiwanese restaurants offer plates of raw, sliced red meat and uncooked seafood that are brought to the table and either barbecued or simmered in a pot of stock. As this constitutes a staple of the Taiwanese diet, any bacteria that may remain doesn't affect the locals, but it can wreak havoc with foreigners. .The best policy is to make sure you cook the food in a manner to which you are accustomed.^ Manners, or Mistakes you do not want to make: .

^ If you plan on staying for one month or more, make sure that all medical and health concerns are addressed before you leave (ie.

^ And if you wear glasses or contacts, make sure that you bring a spare pair, and/or your prescription.

Don't drink tap water without boiling it, though it's safe for brushing your teeth.

Healthcare

Medicines are available for minor ailments at drug stores. .You may also find common drugs requiring a prescription in the west (like asthma inhalers and birth control pills) cheaply available from drug stores without a prescription.^ Go to any store, you'll find something.

^ While there are Police Department buidings as we know them in the west, they're less common, and hard to find.

^ But if you're at a gaijin house, or an older apartment, you may find that there're too many people competing for the shower, or that there's no hot water during the winter.

Taiwan has both Chinese physicians and Western doctors, both of which are taken equally seriously. However, as a foreigner, the assumption would generally be to direct you to a Western doctor. .The quality of the hospitals in Taiwan is excellent and on par, if not better, with those found in the West.^ There aren't many bargains left to be found here, and if you want inexpensive electronics or clothing, you're better off visiting Taiwan or Korea.

Taiwan's health care program is considered as one of the best health care in the world. .Legal residents with a National Health Card can avail themselves of the very convenient and efficient national health service, which covers treatment and medication using both Western and traditional Chinese medicine.^ Japan is a cash-based society, which means that checks are not used very much, and international credit cards are accepted mainly by hotels and restaurants.

^ Train cards are very similar to phone cards, except that they're a little smaller, and are used only for purchasing train tickets.

However, this service is not available to short term visitors on tourist visas; nor does it cover major hospitalization expenses. .Still, hospital visits and medicine in Taiwan tends to be far less expensive than in the west.^ The better hotels are quite expensive, but are ok for stays less than a week.

^ Women are still treated as sex-objects, sex is much more open than in the West, and racism is a blatant problem (especially for Koreans and blacks.

For minor ailments and problems (flu, broken bones, stitches, etc). .Note that outside the major cities, it might be difficult to find a doctor who speaks English, so try to learn some basic Mandarin before heading off the beaten track.^ Unless you live outside of the bigger cities, you won't be able to find a house you can afford.

^ But, it's a lot more difficult to do within the bigger cities, so you'll be better off hitching only outside the cities.

^ I quit my job at home, dumped my car (which had to be replaced anyway,) unloaded my apartment, and sold off some of much belongings before coming to Japan.

Hiking

Watch out for mosquito bites when hiking in the mountains. Especially in the summer, the humid and hot weather makes mosquitos very active. .Most mosquito bites only cause skin irritation and itching, but in some areas of Taiwan it's possible to contract Dengue Fever or Japanese Encephalitis (though they are both on the rare side in Taiwan).^ It is very difficult for most Japanese to meet new people -- they're so afraid of embarassing themselves and other people that they won't say anything at all.

^ They come in 500 yen, 1000 yen, 5000 yen denominations, but most phones only take the 500 yen and 1000 yen cards.

Mosquito/insect repellent spray can be found at convenient stores (such as 7-11 and Family Mart) and local pharmacies. If you are bitten by mosquitos, apply a small amount of ointment for irritation relief.

Respect

Culture

Taiwan shares several cultural taboos with other East Asian nations.
  • Some Taiwanese are superstitious about anything connected with dying – unlucky things should never be mentioned.
  • Do not write people's names in red. This again has connotations of death. When writing someone's English name, this is not a problem, but avoid writing Chinese names in red.
  • Do not whistle or ring a bell at night. This is an "invitation to ghosts".
  • Do not point at cemeteries or graves. This means disrespect to the deaths.
  • There are numerous taboos dictating that certain objects shouldn't be given to others, often because the word for that object sounds like another unfortunate word:
    • Umbrellas, which in Mandarin sound the same as the word for "break up". Friends should therefore never give friends umbrellas. Instead, friends will euphemistically "rent" each other umbrellas for a tiny amount ($1, for example).
    • Clocks. The phrase "to give a clock" ("song zhong"), in Mandarin, has the same sound as the word "to perform last rites." .If you do give someone a clock, the recipient may give you a coin in return to dispel the curse.
    • Shoes.^ And, although some restaurants may have non-smoking areas, don't be too surprised if someone lights up next to you, anyway.

      ^ On a crowded train, someone may feel you up.

      ^ The recipient will then be forced to determine how much your gift was and to give you another one in return.

      Never ever offer shoes as a gift to old people, as it signifies sending them on their way to heaven. .This is acceptable only if by mutual arrangement it is nominally sold, where the receiving party gives a small payment of about $10.
    • Knives or sharp objects, as they are made for or could be used to hurt the person.
  • The Taiwanese are certainly not puritanical and enjoy a drink, especially the locally brewed Taiwan Beer and Kaoliang.^ Train cards are very similar to phone cards, except that they're a little smaller, and are used only for purchasing train tickets.

    ^ Take as many as they give you -- these tissues are intended to be used in the public toilets, and it's one of the really good bargains in Japan.

    ^ Try to avoid buying too many soft drinks since they'll go for about $1 each, and during the summer, may add up to $10 a day, easily.

    However, Taiwan does not have a culture of heavy drinking and is rare to see anyone drunk on the streets. While over indulging in alcohol is not a social taboo as such (and some people do so at weddings), it is considered a sign of lack of self-confidence and immaturity, and doing so certainly won't gain you any respect among Taiwanese friends.
  • You are expected to remove your shoes before entering a house. You will find some slippers to be worn by visitors next to the entrance door. It is likely to be the same ritual for bathrooms and balconies where you will be expected to remove your slippers to wear a pair of plastic sandals (though it is less shocking not to use the sandals by then).
  • In public places, especially in Southern Taiwan, physical contacts of any sorts should be avoided.
  • As you will get along with Taiwanese people, you are very likely to receive small presents of any sorts. This will be drinks, food, little objects... These are a very convenient way to lubricate social relations for Taiwanese people, and are specially commons betweens friends in their 20s. You should reply to any such presents with something similar, but it does not need to be immediate, or specific to the person (i.e. keep it simple). As a teacher you are not expected to offer anything in return (i.e. in a classroom environment) as long as the relationship stays formal. However beware of the sometime overly generous parents who can go as far as offering presents running in the thousands of NT$ and who will then expect you to take special care of their child (understand that their expectations will be considered as fair in Taiwanese culture).
  • You are not expected to tip in hotels, restaurants and taxis, though bellhops may still expect $50 or so for carrying your luggage.
  • If you should need to use a temple's washroom, bow to any statues of deities you see on the way whether or not you believe in them. While most people will not mind you using the temple's washroom, they expect you to treat their place of worship with respect.

Politics

Taiwanese society is rather polarized by allegiance between supporters of the two major political blocks informally known as "Pan-Blue Coalition" and "Pan-Green Coalition", although there are large numbers of people who are either centrist or who don't care. To simplify a complex situation, pan-blue supporters tend to be more favorable toward the idea of (re)unification or maintaining a status-quo with China and pan-green supporters tend to be more favorable toward the idea of establishing a formally independent Republic of Taiwan, among other differences. There is even a small group of people who consider Taiwan a part of Japan, due to 50 years of Japanese occupation.
Although there are some correlations, it is highly unwise to assume anything about a particular persons political beliefs based on what you think you know about their background. Also, the very brief sketch of Taiwanese politics obscures a large amount of complexity.
Unless you know your listener well, it is unwise to say anything (either positive or negative) about the current government, about historical figures in Taiwanese history, about Taiwan's international relations, or about relations with mainland China. Some political figures such as Sun Yat-sen and Chiang Ching-kuo are generally seen positively, but others (Chiang Kai-shek, Lee Teng-hui and Chen Shui-bian in particular) arouse very polarized feelings.
Some Taiwanese will get very offended if you imply that Taiwan is part of China. Others will get very offended if you imply that Taiwan is not part of China. Referring to the PRC as "mainland China" (中國大陸 zhōngguó dàlù) rather than simply China will tend not to offend anyone as the term is generally used to exclude Hong Kong and Macau as well, making it less subjective. Referring to the Republic of China as a whole as "Taiwan Province" will draw a negative reaction from most Taiwanese. "Greater China" may be used in certain business contexts. Keep in mind however, that there are so many subtleties and complexities here that if you are talking about these things, you've already wandered into a minefield.
However, simply referring to the island as 'Taiwan' is fine, as that is the name used by the locals, regardless of their political persuasion. Titles such as 'Republic of China' are reserved for official matters only.

Gay and lesbian travelers

Taiwan is quite liberal when it comes to homosexuality, as Taiwan does not have laws against homosexuality. Regardless, openly displaying your homosexuality in Taiwan wouldn't stir much upset and violence against gays and lesbians rarely occurs.
Gays and lesbians may wish to attend the annual Taiwan Pride parade event (which started around 2003). This event takes place sometime between September and November, and has become the biggest Pride Parade in Asia throughout the years.

Contact

Getting Online

Internet cafes are plentiful, although you may have to wander around before finding one. Rather, Internet cafes in Taiwan should be called gaming cafes. They will be located on the second story of a building, and equipped with very comfortable chairs and large screens. Although people do surf the Internet, most people primarly go there for a smooth experience of online gaming. Each hour of Internet access/game play is cheap, coming in at around $20. Some machines in the internet cafes are coin operated. For free internet access in big cities, try out the local libraries. In addition, a wireless internet accessing net covering all of Taipei City is available (it was free before May 2006 and is now payable at convenient stores in Taipei City) and Kaohsiung City is currently under construction; it already works in some huge MRT stations and on some special points. You will need some sort of login. There is also a common wifi network available at every McDonald's. The login is partly in English.

Telephone

The standard prefix for international calls from Taiwan is 002, though some other companies may use alternative prefixes at lower rates. Check with your telecom operator for more details. Calls to mainland China, Hong Kong or Macau require international dialling. For calls to Taiwan, the country code for Taiwan is 886.
Mobile phone coverage is generally excellent in Taiwan, with the exception of some remote mountainous areas. Among the major providers are Chunghwa Telecom (中華電信), Taiwan Mobile (台灣大哥大), Vibo (威寶電訊) and Far EasTone (遠傳電訊). Taiwan has both GSM 900/1800 and 3G (UMTS/W-CDMA) networks and roaming might be possible for users of such mobile phones, subject to agreements between operators. Most payphones work with telephone cards (電話卡)which are available at all convenience stores.
Numbers Starting With 0800 are commercial toll-free numbers, just like the 1-800 numbers in North America.

Media

Taiwan has a very free and liberal press. There are three daily newspapers available in English:
Other news sources:
  • Central News Agency [41]
  • Government Information Office's periodicals [42]
  • RTI (Radio Taiwan International) [43]
  • the Taiwan Economic News [44]
  • Taiwan Headlines [45]
  • Taiwan Journal [46]
  • TaipeiNews.net [47]
  • Taiwan Sun [48]
Free magazines:
  • Highway 11 Magazine [49] - A free east coast travel & lifestyle magazine in Hualien County - bilingual
  • Xpat [50] - a magazine dedicated to promoting Arts and Culture in Taiwan - English.
  • Lifestyle - info on Taiwan relating to what's on and current trends - bilingual.
  • Taiphoon [51] - a magazine dedicated to promoting peace and environmental awareness in Taiwan - bilingual.
  • Journey East [52] - a travel & lifestyle magazine for northern Taiwan - bilingual.

Cope

Foreign Missions

As the People's Republic of China (PRC) does not allow other nations to have official diplomatic relations with both itself and the ROC in Taiwan, many of the world's major nations do not have official embassies or consulates in Taiwan. However, as the PRC allows recognition of Taiwan as a separate economy, many nations maintain a "Trade Office", "Institute" or something of similar nature such as American Institute in Taiwan (AIT) or European Economic and Trade Office and these usually perform limited consular activities such as issuing visas. For more information, visit the Ministry of Foreign Affairs [53] web-site.
This is a usable article. It has information about the country and for getting in, as well as links to several destinations. An adventurous person could use this article, but please plunge forward and help it grow!

Wiktionary

Up to date as of January 15, 2010

Definition from Wiktionary, a free dictionary

See also Taiwán, Taïwan, and Táiwān

Contents

English

Etymology

.From Tayuan, Tayoan, or other variants, referring to “I/us”, in the Siraya Formosan language.^ Languages : Putonghua (Mandarin Chinese, official), Holo Taiwanese, Hakka (spoken by the Hakka minority group), other indigenous languages (Formosan).
  • Taiwan - Republic of China - ROC - Country Profile - T'ai-wan - Asia 28 January 2010 1:44 UTC www.nationsonline.org [Source type: News]

Similar to tayo in Tagalog.

Proper noun

Singular
Taiwan
Plural
-
Taiwan
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Wikipedia has an article on:
.
  1. Common name for a country in East Asia.^ Wikipedia has an article on: Taiwan Common name for a country in East Asia .
    • Taiwan (East Asia, China, Mainland China, Formosa) @ Reference.tw 28 January 2010 1:57 UTC www.reference.tw [Source type: News]

    ^ This island country is positioned off the southeastern coast of Asia, directly east of China, and bordered by the Pacific Ocean, East China Sea, South China Sea, Luzon Strait and the Taiwan Strait.
    • Map of Taiwan - Asian Countries, Taiwan Information Map History - World Atlas 28 January 2010 1:57 UTC www.worldatlas.com [Source type: News]

    ^ THE EXTRAORDINARY record of economic growth in the newly industrializing countries of East Asia has powerfully influenced the conventional wisdom about both economic policy and geopolitics.
    • The Myth of Asia's Miracle 11 September 2009 12:18 UTC web.mit.edu [Source type: Original source]

    Official name: Republic of China, Its de facto capital is Taipei.
  2. An island off the coast of mainland China, also known as Formosa since 16th century.

Derived terms

Translations