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Tamaulipas
Free and Sovereign State of Tamaulipas
—  State  —

Flag

Seal
Location of Tamaulipas within Mexico
Municipalities of Tamaulipas
Coordinates: 24°17′14″N 98°33′48″W / 24.28722°N 98.56333°W / 24.28722; -98.56333Coordinates: 24°17′14″N 98°33′48″W / 24.28722°N 98.56333°W / 24.28722; -98.56333
Country  Mexico
Capital Ciudad Victoria
Municipalities 43
Largest City Reynosa
Government
 - Governor Eugenio Hernández Flores (PRI)
 - Federal Deputies PAN:5
PRI:3
 - Federal Senators PAN:2
PRI:1
Area
Ranked 7th
 - Total 79,384 km2 (30,650.3 sq mi)
Population (2005)
 - Total 3,024,238 (Ranked 13th)
 - Demonym Tamaulipeco
Time zone CST (UTC-6)
 - Summer (DST) CDT (UTC-5)
HDI (2004) 0.8111 - high
Ranked 11th
ISO 3166-2 MX-TAM
Postal abbr. Tamps.
Website Tamaulipas state government

Tamaulipas is one of the 31 states of Mexico and is located in the central-northeastern part of the Mexican federation. It borders the U.S. state of Texas to the north, the Gulf of Mexico to the east, Veracruz to the south, San Luis Potosí to the southwest, and Nuevo León to the west.

The name Tamaulipas is derived from Tamaholipa, a Huastec term in which the tam- prefix signifies "place where." As yet, there is no scholarly agreement on the meaning of holipa, but "high hills" is a common interpretation. (However, a native population of Tamaulipas, now extinct, was referred to as the "Olives" during the early colonial period, which is a likely Spanish transformation on holipa.)

According to the 2006 census, Tamaulipas has a population of 3,024,238. Its capital is Ciudad Victoria. Other important cities include Reynosa, Matamoros, Nuevo Laredo and Tampico.

Contents

History

The area currently known as Tamaulipas has been inhabited for at least 8,000 years. Several different cultures (north coastal, south coastal, lowlands, and mountains) have passed during that period.

Although Hernán Cortés conquered the Aztecs rather quickly, it took a gradual process for Spain to subjugate the inhabitants of Tamaulipas in the 16th and 17th centuries. The first permanent Spanish settlement in the area was Tampico in 1554. More work along these lines was done by Franciscan missionaries, although repeated indigenous rebellions kept the area unstable. What is now Tamaulipas was first incorporated as a separate province of New Spain in 1746 with the name Nuevo Santander. The local government capital during this time moved from Santander to San Carlos, and finally to Aguayo.

After Mexico's independence from Spain, Tamaulipas continued to be an unstable region. The fight in the national government between federalist and centralist factions resulted in repeated rebellions. In January 1854, Tamaulipas was declared a state of the union during the civil war between Santa Anna and the liberal guerrilla factions that had been in power before him. Its capital was kept at Aguayo, which would later be renamed Ciudad Victoria.

It briefly became a part of the Republic of the Rio Grande.

The French occupation and reign of Emperor Maximilian during the 1860s was difficult for Tamaulipas, at least on the borders and in the city of Tampico. Portions of Tamaulipas supported the guerrilla fighters resisting the French, especially in the north. It was not until two years after French occupation began that Tamaulipas as a state finally acceded to Maximilian's rule, and it was not until 1866 that the last French soldiers left the state, leading up to Maximilian's execution in 1867.

However, the years after Maximilian's defeat were ones of rebuilding and great growth in Tamaulipas. International trade began to blossom, especially with the coming of the railroad to Tampico, which was developing as not only a port city, but an industrial and commercial center as well. The railroad allowed goods to flow quickly from the mines and cities of the interior and the Texas border to Tampico for processing and shipment. This in turn caused significant growth in towns such as Matamoros and Nuevo Laredo.

Since the revolution of 1910, successive governments have dedicated themselves to building industry and infrastructure in Tamaulipas, including communications and educational systems. Norberto Treviño Zapata founded the state university system as well as reformed the state oil industry. Marte Gómez provided increased farm sizes for private family farmers. And more recently, Emilio Martínez Manautou led industrial growth. Lately a push has been to strengthen fishing, including efforts to increase the price of fish and shellfish on the international market.

Geography

The geographic imaginary line known as the Tropic of Cancer crosses the northern part of the capital city of Ciudad Victoria.

The coastal plains along the Gulf have a large presence in the state, whereas in-land the landscape is adorned by cactus species and pasture. Predominant fauna in the region include the Cougar (Puma concolor), Long-tailed Weasel (Mustela frenata), Ocelot (Leopardus pardalis), American Badger (Taxidea taxus), North American Beaver (Castor canadensis), Plain Chachalaca (Ortalis vetula) and quail.

In the southeast, the Sierra Madre Oriental displays warm valleys and high sierras with peaks reaching 3,280 m (10,800 ft) in the Pedragoso Sierra; 3,240 m (10,600 ft) in the Borregos Sierra; 3,220 m (10,600 ft) in La Gloria Sierra; 3,180 m (10,400 ft) in Cerro el Nacimiento; and 3,000 m (9,800 ft) above sea level in the Sierra el Pinal.

In terms of hydrology, the Bravo, Purificacion and Guayalejo rivers flow into the Gulf of Mexico after crossing the state from the western inland. On their way, their basins and zones of influence naturally correspond to the areas destined for agricultural use. The Rio Bravo, preferably known in Mexico as the Rio Grande, represents the northern frontier shared with the United States. One of the tributaries of this natural border, the San Juan River, feeds the Falcon International Reservoir and the Marte Gomez Dam, which, in conjunction with the "Friendship Dam", reach a capacity of 12,940 million cubic meters of stored water. Agricultural and cattle raising activities are served by other 14 dams across the state, with a total capacity of 7,500 million cubic meters of water.

As much as 90% of the state reports a dry or semi-dry climate, while the Huasteca mountain range presents hot and semi-humid conditions, along with humid winds coming from the Gulf, which means it is located in a zone highly influenced by cyclones, with predominant winds coming from the east and southeast.

Economy and culture

Northern Tamaulipas shares its culture with that of Texas, and is primarily characterized by agriculture and strong growth in all industrial sectors. This region is home to many of the maquiladoras, factories owned by foreign companies but worked primarily by Mexicans.

Southern Tamaulipas' economy is based primarily on the petrochemical industries. There are petrochemical production plants around Altamira as well as a principal Gulf coast container port, refinery facilities in Ciudad Madero and many oil-industry support service companies in Tampico, as well as a major general and bulk cargo port.[1] Also of importance are the tourism and fishing industries, as well as much commercial shipping, based in Tampico and Altamira. The little village of La Pesca, in the municipality of Soto La Marina, about midway between Brownsville, Texas and Tampico, is a rapidly growing tourist area with lovely beaches and excellent fishing both in the Gulf of Mexico and the Rio Soto La Marina. The central zone contains the capital, Ciudad Victoria, and is home to much forestry and farming, as well as some industrial development. About 30% of the population lives here, both in the capital and in Ciudad Mante. Ciudad Victoria is a significant educational center, home to the Autonomous University of Tamaulipas (which also has campuses in other cities in the state), the Regional Technical Institute of Ciudad Victoria, the University of Valle de Bravo, and other institutions of learning.

As of the 1990 Mexican census, 13 percent of the homes had only dirt floors, nearly 19 percent had no running water, and over 15 percent of the homes had no electricity. This was better than the national average, but was skewed because of the high rate of development in the urban centers — in rural communities in Tamaulipas, access to running water was available in less than 40 percent of homes.

As of 2005, Tamaulipas’s economy represents 3.3% of Mexico’s total gross domestic product or 21,664 million USD.[2] Tamaulipas's economy has a strong focus on export oriented manufacturing (i.e. maquiladora / INMEX). As of 2005, 258,762 people are employed in the manufacturing sector.[3] Foreign direct investment in Tamaulipas was 386.2 million USD for 2005. The average wage for an employee in Tamaulipas is approximately 240 pesos per day, $2.00 to $3.00 an hour.[4]

Largest cities and projects

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Major cities

The state is subdivided into 43 municipalities.

City City
Population[5]
Metropolitan
Population[6]
Metropolitan
area type
Reynosa 507,998 1,007,538 International
Matamoros 422,711 864,756 International
Nuevo Laredo 348,387 718,073 International
Tampico 303,635 818,102 Bi-State
Ciudad Victoria 278,455 282,178 In-State
Ciudad Madero 193,045 193,045 City
Rio Bravo 83,736 - see Reynosa
Miramar 82,079 - see Altamira
Ciudad Mante 81,884 112,061 Municipality
Altamira 58,896 162,628 Municipality
Valle Hermoso 47,696 62,193 Municipality

Education

Tamaulipas enjoys standards slightly higher than the national averages, since illiteracy has been reduced to 5% for those over 15 years of age, average schooling reaches 8,7 years, and as much as 11% have earned a professional degree.

Institutions of higher education include:

Notable natives and residents

References

  1. ^ "Puerto de Tampico". Ports in Mexico. World Port Source. http://www.worldportsource.com/ports/MEX_Puerto_de_Tampico_237.php. Retrieved 2009-12-17.  
  2. ^ Industrial Costs in Mexico - A Guide for Foreign Investors 2007. Mexico City: Bancomext. 2007. pp. 102.  
  3. ^ Industrial Costs in Mexico - A Guide for Foreign Investors 2007. Mexico City: Bancomext. 2007. pp. 102.  
  4. ^ Tamaulipas Investment Guide - Understand Mexico
  5. ^ Link to tables of population data from Census of 2005
  6. ^ World Gazetteer

External links


Travel guide

Up to date as of January 14, 2010

From Wikitravel

Contents

Tamaulipas is a state in Northern Mexico.

  • Frontera - The area along the Mexican-US border.
  • Sierra Madre - Mountainous region along the West of the state.
  • Gulf Coast - Tropical region along the coast.
  • Huasteca - Cultural region beginning at the southern tip of the state.
  • Biosfera El Cielo, [1].

Understand

Tamaulipas lies between Nuevo León and the Gulf of Mexico in the north of the country. It shares a border with the US state of Texas in the north and the states of San Luis Potosí and Veracruz to the south.

  • Presa Vicente Guerrero - This large lake lies about 30 miles northwest of Ciudad Victoria
  • Fish - The coast has many "fishing hotels", hotels with their own piers for easy fishing access. The state has a number of lakes as well.
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1911 encyclopedia

Up to date as of January 14, 2010

From LoveToKnow 1911

TAMAULIPAS, a northern Gulf-coast state of Mexico, bounded N. by Texas, U.S.A., E. by the Gulf of Mexico, S.E. by Vera Cruz, S. by San Luis Potosi, W. by Nuevo Leon, and N.W. by Coahuila. Area 32,128 sq. m. Pop. (1900) 218,948. The central and southern parts of the state are mountainous, but there are extensive fertile plains in the N. sloping gently N.E. toward the Rio Grande, and the coastal zone is sandy, much broken by lagoons and uninhabited. Except in the N. this coastal zone is only 5 to 7 m. wide, but the foothills region back of this is usually well wooded and fertile, and the low alluvial river valleys penetrate deeply into the sierras. There are four navigable rivers in the state - the Rio Grande del Norte, or Rio Bravo, which forms the boundary line with the United States, the Conchas or Presas, the Soto da Marina, and the Tamesi. The Panuco forms the southern boundary for a short distance. A peculiar feature of the hydrography of Tamaulipas is the series of coastal lagoons formed by the building of new beaches across the indentations of the coast. The largest of these is the Laguna de la Madre, 125 m. long, which receives the waters of the Rio Conchas, and is separated in places from the Gulf by only a narrow ridge of sand dunes. The climate is hot, humid and malarial on the coast, but is pleasant on the more elevated lands of the interior. On the plains bordering the Rio Grande frosts are frequent. The rainfall is abundant, especially on the mountain slopes of the south. The principal industry is agriculture. Sugar, cereals, tobacco, cotton and coffee are produced, and probably fruit may be raised successfully. Stock-raising receives some attention and hides and cattle are exported. The preparation of ixtle fibre for export is becoming an important industry. Copper is mined and extensive deposits of petroleum and asphalt are being exploited. Railway communication is provided by the Mexican National which crosses the northern end of the state, the Belgian line from Monterrey to Tampico, and a branch of the Mexican Central from San Luis Potosi to Tampico.

The capital of Tamaulipas is Ciudad Victoria (pop. in 1900, 10,086), a small sierra town on the Monterrey and Tampico railway about 120 m. from Tampico. Its public buildings are good and it has the improvements of a modern town. It has a fine climate, a good trade, and is a summer resort for residents of the coast. The city is near the Rio Santander, and was once called Nuevo Santander. Among other towns in the state may be mentioned: Matamoros, on the Rio Grande; Tampico (q.v.), on the Panuco, the principal port of the state; Tula (6935(6935 in 1900); Jaumave (about 10,000 in 1900, chiefly Indians), 38 m. S.W. of Ciudad Victoria, in the heart of a prominent ixtle-producing region; Mier (7114 in 1895), on the Rio Grande, 95 m. E.N.E. of Monterrey; San Carlos (6871 in 18 95), 57 m. N.E. of the capital; Camargo (6815 in 1895), on the San Juan near the Rio Grande, once the old Spanish mission of San Augustin Laredo; and Reynosa (6137 in 18 95), 54 m. W.N.W. of Matamoros.


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Wiktionary

Up to date as of January 15, 2010

Definition from Wiktionary, a free dictionary

Contents

English

Map of Mexico highlighting Tamaulipas

Etymology

Wastek.

Proper noun

Singular
Tamaulipas

Plural
-

Tamaulipas

  1. A state of Mexico.

Translations

See also


Spanish

Etymology

Wastek.

Proper noun

Tamaulipas m.

  1. A state of Mexico.

Related terms

See also

  • Wikipedia-logo.png Tamaulipas on the Spanish Wikipedia.es.Wikipedia

Simple English

State of Tamaulipas
File:Flag of
Flag
File:Coat of arms of
Coat of arms
Location within Mexico
Country
Capital Victoria
Municipalities 43
Largest City Tampico
Government
 - Governor Eugenio Hernández Flores (PRI)
 - Federal Deputies PAN:5
PRI:3
 - Federal Senators PAN:2
PRI:1
Area
Ranked 7th
 - Total 79,384 km2 (30,650.3 sq mi)
Population (2005)
 - Total 3,024,238 (Ranked 13th)
 - Demonym Tamaulipeco
Time zone CST (UTC-6)
 - Summer (DST) CDT (UTC-5)
HDI (2004) 0.8111 - high
Ranked 11th
ISO 3166-2 MX-TAM
Postal abbr. Tamps.
Website Tamaulipas state government

Tamaulipas is a state in the northeast of Mexico. About 3,025,000 people live there. Its capital is called Ciudad Victoria.


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