Tammy Baldwin: Wikis

  
  

Note: Many of our articles have direct quotes from sources you can cite, within the Wikipedia article! This article doesn't yet, but we're working on it! See more info or our list of citable articles.

Encyclopedia

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Tammy Baldwin


Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Wisconsin's 2nd district
Incumbent
Assumed office 
January 3, 1999
Preceded by Scott Klug

Member of the Wisconsin State Assembly
from the 78th district
In office
January 1993 – January 1999
Preceded by David E. Clarenbach
Succeeded by Mark Pocan

Born February 11, 1962 (1962-02-11) (age 47)
Madison, Wisconsin
Political party Democratic
Domestic partner Lauren Azar
Residence Madison, Wisconsin
Alma mater Smith College, University of Wisconsin–Madison
Occupation attorney
Website tammybaldwin.house.gov

Tammy Suzanne Green Baldwin (born February 11, 1962) is an American politician, and has been a Democratic member of the United States House of Representatives since 1999, representing Wisconsin's 2nd congressional district.

Contents

Early life and career

Baldwin was born to Pamela Green and grew up in Madison, Wisconsin.[1] Baldwin graduated from Madison West High School in 1980 as the class valedictorian. She earned a bachelor's degree from Smith College in 1984, and a law degree from the University of Wisconsin Law School in 1989.[2]

Baldwin was first elected to political office in 1986 when she was elected to the Dane County Board of Supervisors, a position that she held until 1994. She also served one year on the Madison, Wisconsin City Council to fill a vacancy in the coterminous district. Baldwin then served in the Wisconsin State Assembly from 1993 to 1999 and was elected to the House in 1998.

Baldwin is the first woman elected to Congress from the state of Wisconsin, and is currently serving her fifth term. She was also the first ever openly gay non-incumbent to be elected to the House of Representatives, her election having won the backing of the Gay & Lesbian Victory Fund. As of January 6, 2009, Baldwin is one of three openly gay members of Congress, the others being fellow Democrats Barney Frank of Massachusetts and Jared Polis of Colorado.[3] Her domestic partner is Lauren Azar.[4] She is a member of the Congressional Progressive Caucus.

On August 1, 2007, Tammy Baldwin signed on to cosponsor H. Res. 333, a bill proposing articles of impeachment against Vice President Dick Cheney and H Res. 589, a bill proposing the impeachment of Attorney General Alberto Gonzales.

Baldwin speaks during the second day of the 2008 Democratic National Convention in Denver, Colorado.

On July 26, 2004, she spoke at the 2004 Democratic National Convention in prime time on the issue of health care. For the 2008 presidential election, she pledged as a superdelegate to Hillary Clinton.

On October 10, 2002, Tammy Baldwin was among the 133 members of the House who voted against authorizing the invasion of Iraq.

During the 110th Congress, Baldwin has authored several pieces of legislation that have been passed by the House. The Reeve Paralysis Act authorizes more funding for treating ailments that result in immobility, while National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program Act increases funding for low-income women to receive preventative screenings. Another bill that she authored, the Veteran Vision Equity Act, guarantees benefits for military veterans.[4]

Women's rights

Tammy Baldwin is a self-described advocate for women's rights and equality.[5] She has stated her support for such legislation as the Equal Pay Act (EPA) and recently voted for the Ledbetter Fair Pay Act.[5][6] These acts criminalize and outline prosecution guidelines and punishments for wage discrimination based on sex. She received a grade of 100 from the League of Women Voters as of 2007.[7] She has received favorable evaluations from other civil rights groups, such as the American Civil Liberties Union.[7]

Representative Baldwin has also advanced what she sees as stronger enforcement of laws against sexual violence and violence against women.[5] She is a supporter of the Violence Against Women Act, which allowed victims of sexual violence and other sexual crimes to take their cases to federal courts as well as providing funding for various anti-sexual violence initiatives and programs. She is also among the sponsors of a resolution to promote and support National Sexual Assault Awareness and Prevention Month.[5]

Baldwin has also promoted her efforts on behalf of women's health and reproductive rights.[5] She sponsored of the National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program Reauthorization Act of 2007, which helped low-income, underinsured and uninsured women pay for cervical and breast cancer related medical services.[5][8 ]

Committee assignments

Tammy Baldwin presiding over the House while serving as Speaker Pro Tempore

Electoral history

  • 2008 Race for U.S. House of Representatives — 2nd District
    • Tammy Baldwin (D) (inc.), 69%
    • Peter Theron (R), 31%
  • 2006 Race for U.S. House of Representatives — 2nd District
    • Tammy Baldwin (D) (inc.), 63%
    • Dave Magnum (R), 37%
  • 2004 Race for U.S. House of Representatives — 2nd District
    • Tammy Baldwin (D) (inc.), 63%
    • Dave Magnum (R), 37%
  • 2002 Race for U.S. House of Representatives — 2nd District
    • Tammy Baldwin (D) (inc.), 66%
    • Ron Greer (R), 34%
  • 2000 Race for U.S. House of Representatives — 2nd District
    • Tammy Baldwin (D) (inc.), 51%
    • John Sharpless (R), 49%
  • 1998 Race for U.S. House of Representatives — 2nd District
    • Tammy Baldwin (D), 53%
    • Josephine Musser (R), 47%

Footnotes

External links

Articles / presentations
United States House of Representatives
Preceded by
Scott Klug
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Wisconsin's 2nd congressional district

1999 – present
Incumbent
Representatives to the 106th–111th United States Congresses from Wisconsin
106th Senate: H. Kohl | R. Feingold House: D. Obey | J. Sensenbrenner | T. Petri | J. Kleczka | T. Barrett | R. Kind | T. Baldwin | M. Green | P. Ryan
107th Senate: H. Kohl | R. Feingold House: D. Obey | J. Sensenbrenner | T. Petri | J. Kleczka | T. Barrett | R. Kind | T. Baldwin | M. Green | P. Ryan
108th Senate: H. Kohl | R. Feingold House: D. Obey | J. Sensenbrenner | T. Petri | J. Kleczka | R. Kind | T. Baldwin | M. Green | P. Ryan
109th Senate: H. Kohl | R. Feingold House: D. Obey | J. Sensenbrenner | T. Petri | R. Kind | T. Baldwin | M. Green | P. Ryan | G. Moore
110th Senate: H. Kohl | R. Feingold House: D. Obey | J. Sensenbrenner | T. Petri | R. Kind | T. Baldwin | P. Ryan | G. Moore | S. Kagen
111th Senate: H. Kohl | R. Feingold House: D. Obey | J. Sensenbrenner | T. Petri | R. Kind | T. Baldwin | P. Ryan | G. Moore | S. Kagen







Got something to say? Make a comment.
Your name
Your email address
Message