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Tatsunoko vs. Capcom: Ultimate All-Stars

Cover of the North American Wii version of Tatsunoko vs. Capcom: Ultimate All-Stars.
Developer(s) Eighting[1]
Publisher(s) Capcom
Director(s) Hidetoshi Ishizawa[2]
Producer(s) Ryota Niitsuma[3]
Series Vs. series
Native resolution 480p
Platform(s) Arcade, Wii
Release date(s) As Cross Generation of Heroes:
Arcade:
JP December 2008[4]
Wii:
JP December 11, 2008[5]

As Ultimate All-Stars:
NA January 26, 2010[6]
JP January 28, 2010
EU January 29, 2010

Genre(s) Fighting
Mode(s) Single-player, multiplayer, online multiplayer[6]
Rating(s) BBFC: 12
CERO: B
ESRB: T
PEGI: 12+
Input methods 8-way joystick, 4 buttons
Wii Remote, Nunchuk, Classic Controller, GameCube controller (Wii version)[6]
Arcade system Unnamed Wii-based arcade board[7]

Tatsunoko vs. Capcom: Ultimate All-Stars is a crossover fighting game developed by Eighting and published by Capcom for the Wii gaming console. The title is Capcom's seventh game in the Versus series, and will be released in North America, Japan and Europe in January 2010. The game was originally released exclusively in Japan as Tatsunoko vs. Capcom: Cross Generation of Heroes (タツノコ VS. CAPCOM CROSS GENERATION OF HEROES ?) for video arcades and the Wii in December 2008. Fan reception of the game led Capcom to localize it with help from Tatsunoko Production to deal with licensing issues involving the Tatsunoko characters.

Tatsunoko vs. Capcom features characters from the Japanese animation studio Tatsunoko Production and video game company Capcom.[8] Like traditional fighting games, gameplay consists of attempting to knockout the opponent on a 2D plane. This plane creates a 2.5D environment in conjunction with character models and backgrounds rendered in 3D—a first for the Vs. series. Tatsunoko vs. Capcom's simplified three-button attack system is a departure from Street Fighter and some previous Versus fighting titles since the game was developed with the Wii in mind.

Contents

Gameplay

Gameplay screen of Tatsunoko vs. Capcom: Ultimate All-Stars. Joe the Condor of Gatchaman fights against Batsu of Rival Schools with a kick attack.

Tatsunoko vs. Capcom is Capcom's seventh installment in its Vs. series, which includes the Marvel vs. Capcom and Capcom vs. SNK games. It is the first Vs. series game to feature 3D graphics on a 2D plane. This creates a 2.5D environment consisting of character models and backgrounds rendered in 3D, while gameplay remains on a 2D plane used in traditional fighting games.[9] Tatsunoko vs. Capcom does not have the more complex attack systems like in the Street Fighter series and some previous Versus fighting titles. The game uses a simplified three-button attack system with the option for a more simplified control scheme since it was developed with the Wii in mind. The three attack buttons are listed as "Weak", "Medium" and "Strong". Players face each other with a team of two in a one-on-one fight to deplete their opponent's health bar. To regenerate health, each player may switch out their characters at any time.[3] A team can perform two special moves at the same time (which however uses up three special bars). The match is over once one of the teams have no remaining fighters. The game's two large characters, Tatsunoko's Gold Lightan and Capcom's PTX-40A, fight on their own without a partner resulting in the inability to do universal techniques that require a partner.[3]

Universal mechanics are similar to the previous Marvel vs. Capcom games. Characters can call their partner to do a predefined "Variable Assist" attack. Characters can tag with another character, performing an attack upon entry called a "Variable Attack". Performing a "Variable Counter" also lets the player tag out with another character.[10] "Snapback" is an attack that forces the opponent to switch characters should it land. "Hyper Variable Combination" lets characters of one team perform their Hyper moves,[11] attacks that require a stock of level, at the same time, whereas "Delayed Hyper Cancellation" cancels a current Hyper move of the character with another Hyper move of the character's partner.[10] Each character has a launcher to send the opponent to the air, allowing the character to do an "Air Combo".

There are also new universal techniques found in the game. "Variable Aerial Rave" lets the character switch to his or her partner while in mid-air.[11] "Mega Crash" is a defensive maneuver that frees the character from the opponent while sacrificing a part of his or her life and two stocks of levels.[10] "Baroque Cancel" is a mode where the character glows in a rainbow of colors while sacrificing the red portion of the character's life - activating the mode cancels the current attack animation, allowing the player to extend combos and deal more damage relative to the amount of red life that is sacrificed.[3] Baroque ends when the character stops or performs a Hyper move.

Tatsunoko vs. Capcom: Cross Generation of Heroes has an Arcade mode, which involves the player battling against computer controlled opponents in multiple stages until he or she reaches the boss character, Yami from Ōkami. Time attack and Survival mode requires the player to defeat every character in the game. Survival limits health regeneration while Time attack is solely about completing it in the shortest time possible. There is a shop where unlockable characters, alternate character costumes, character profiles, movies, illustrations, background music for use in the gallery and minigames can be purchased with money obtained throughout the game. There are also modes exclusively for multiple players. Vs. Mode is the where two players can compete simultaneously, while Original Games is where up to four players compete in character-specific minigames.[12] Ultimate All-Stars will add new features, including online multiplayer via Nintendo Wi-Fi Connection[6], a new Top-down shooter minigame named "Ultimate All-Shooters"[13] and new character ending artwork by UDON.[14]

Characters

From Tatsunoko properties

Character Origin Voice Actor[15]
Ken the Eagle Science Ninja Team Gatchaman Katsuji Mori
Jun the Swan Science Ninja Team Gatchaman Kazuko Sugiyama
Casshan1 Neo-Human Casshern Daisuke Ono
Tekkaman Tekkaman: The Space Knight Katsuji Mori
Polimar Hurricane Polymar Kunihiko Yasui
Yatterman-12 Yatterman Eri Kitamura
Karas Karas Endo Daichi
Doronjo3 Yatterman Noriko Ohara
Hakushon Daimaō45 The Genie Family Tōru Ōhira
Ippatsuman4 Gyakuten! Ippatsuman Masayuki Katō
Gold Lightan6 Golden Warrior Gold Lightan Issei Futamata
Tekkaman Blade47 Tekkaman Blade Toshiyuki Morikawa
Joe the Condor47 Science Ninja Team Gatchaman Isao Sasaki
Yatterman-2478 Yatterman Emiri Katō
Notes:
1 Casshan is accompanied by Friender, who assists in some of his special attacks and hyper combos.
2 Yatterman-1 is accompanied by Yatterwan, who assists in his hyper combos. In Cross Generation of Heroes, Yatterpelican substitutes for Yatterwan when using Yatterman-1's alternate color scheme.
3 Doronjo is accompanied by Boyacky (voice: Jōji Yanami) and Tonzura (voice: Kazuya Tatekabe), who assist in all of her special attacks and hyper combos.
4 Wii-exclusive character.
5 Playable only in Cross Generation of Heroes.[16]
6 Single Entry (cannot be teamed up with another character) and Sub-Boss in Cross Generation of Heroes.
7 Playable only in Ultimate All-Stars.[17][18]
8 Yatterman-2 is assisted by Omotchama and Yatterpelican during her hyper combos.

From Capcom properties

Character Origin Voice Actor[15]
Ryu Street Fighter Hiroki Takahashi
Chun-Li Street Fighter II Fumiko Orikasa
Alex Street Fighter III Hiroki Yasumoto
Morrigan Aenslanda Darkstalkers Yayoi Jinguji
Batsu Ichimonji Rival Schools: United By Fate Nobuyuki Hiyama
MegaMan Volnutt Mega Man Legends Mayumi Tanaka
Kaijin no Soki Onimusha: Dawn of Dreams Toshiyuki Kusuda
Roll Mega Man Hiromi Igarashi
Saki Omokaneb Quiz Nanairo Dreams Yōko Honna
Viewtiful Joebc Viewtiful Joe Shinji Kawada
PTX-40Ad Lost Planet: Extreme Condition
Frank Westbef Dead Rising Peter Von Gomm
Zerobe Mega Man X Ryotaro Okiayu
Yamig Ōkami
Notes:
a Morrigan is assisted by Lilith during her Darkness Illusion hyper combo.
b Wii-exclusive character.
c Viewtiful Joe is assisted by Sexy Silvia during his Six Cannon hyper combo.
d Single Entry (means cannot be teamed up with another character) and Sub-Boss in Cross Generation of Heroes..
e Playable only in Ultimate All-Stars.[6][18]
f Frank West is assisted by zombies from Dead Rising.
g Final Boss character (non-playable).

Development

The concept of Tatsunoko vs. Capcom: Cross Generation of Heroes began when Tatsunoko Production approached Capcom to develop a game involving their characters. Capcom's Ryota Niitsuma said he was interested in making a fighting game at the time and they thought it was more suitable for Tatsunoko's characters to be in a Versus game as opposed to a Street Fighter game.[19] Capcom announced on May 22, 2008 its seventh fighting game in its Vs. series titled Tatsunoko vs. Capcom: Cross Generation of Heroes, for Japanese arcades.[20] It was produced by Ryota Niitsuma, directed by Hidetoshi Ishizawa, developed by Eighting and published by Capcom. After its announcement, the publisher then started to reveal the game's cast until its release.[21][22] The cast were all handpicked by the development team as their desirable line-up for a fighting game. Specifically, the Tatsunoko cast consisted of characters they were fond of from their youth.[23] By September, the game was 70% complete and announced for the Wii in Japan.[24] The game's opening song, "Across the border", is sung by Asami Abe.[25]

The development team sought to include the characters of Phoenix Wright and Franziska von Karma from the Ace Attorney series; while the latter would have been easy due to her use of a whip, they had struggled to find appropriate fighting moves for Phoenix beyond his finger-pointing gesture. Though they had come up with an attack that used his catch-phrase "Igiari!" ("Objection!" in English), with the letters themselves used to attack the opponent, they found that localization would have changed the four-character phrase (in kanji) to a ten-letter word and would have unbalanced the game.[26]

Localization

Capcom did not originally intend to release Tatsunoko vs. Capcom: Cross Generation of Heroes outside of Japan. Fan reception of the game led Capcom to attempt localization with help from Tatsunoko Production to deal with licensing issues involving the Tatsunoko characters. Most of Tatsunoko’s cast are licensed to different companies in North America, such as Time Warner.[23] Other problems involve its developers, Eighting, having already moved on to a new project and the obscurity of Tatsunoko's lineup to the non-Japanese market. This made some critics doubtful that the game would see an international release.[7][27] Adam Sessler from X-Play stated "clearing the American rights to show them all in one game would be a logistical nightmare."[28] Capcom's Community Manager Seth Killian said in an December 2008 interview the company was working to deal with these issues.[29] Capcom's Christian Svensson, vice president of business development and strategic planning reassured in March 2009, "Do not rule it out" and the company was currently attempting to work around licensing and resource issues.[1]

For Capcom's Electronic Entertainment Expo 2009 lineup, the publisher listed two "mystery games" on May 6, 2009 to be shown at the event.[30] "Capcom Mystery Game #1" was revealed in Nintendo Power to be the localization of Tatsunoko vs. Capcom dubbed with the subtitle "Ultimate All-Stars" for North America and Europe, which was playable at the company's booth.[7][31] A Capcom press release on June 2, 2009 stated that this version for North America will have more mini-games, an "enhanced" story mode, and Wi-Fi compatible for online play. In addition, the roster will be expanded by five characters but will lose one Tatsunoko character (Hakushon Daimaō) in its localization.[11] However, Capcom later revised this press release since it was incorrect and stated they are "looking into adding new features to the game, including possible additions of several new characters from both Capcom and Tatsunoko and is exploring the option of online gameplay."[27][32] Starting at the 2009 Tokyo Game Show, the publisher then revealed the game's cast before its release although some were leaked from the official site through its JavaScript code.[18][33] Tatsunoko vs. Capcom was optimized for the Wii, particularly its graphical characteristics, inhibiting it from being ported to other consoles without thoroughly re-building the game. The producer suggested a sequel would be more suitable and Capcom will first gauge reception of the Wii game.[34] He thought if gamers invested in arcade sticks for this title, it would be a "disservice to fans" to not produce more games.[16]

Ryota Niitsuma claimed that the character licensing acquirement process was difficult since it practically involved going through each character one at a time. Also, this process was done on a region-specific basis — what was cleared for North America also had to be checked for its European release.[16] Hidetoshi Ishizawa admitted that, just as Cross Generation of Heroes was not initially planned to be released internationally, neither was Ultimate All-Stars planned to be released in Japan. Fan appeals and the research and development team's own hopes eventually resulted in the announcement that the updated game would come to Japanese shores as well.[2]

Reception

Famitsu magazine scored Tatsunoko vs. Capcom: Cross Generation of Heroes a 32 out of 40 calling gameplay a bit flat since skilled players are conduced to repeat Baroque combos. The reviewers noted variety of characters and its fighting system as strong aspects.[8] As of June 2009, the Wii game sold 41,672 units in Japan.[35]

Ultimate All-Stars' debut at E3 2009 garnered it numerous genre-specific awards, thus winning the Game Critics Award for "Best Fighting Game".[36]

References

  1. ^ a b Orry, Tom (2008-11-03). "'Do not rule out' Tatsunoko vs. Capcom western release". VideoGamer.com. Pro-G. http://www.videogamer.com/news/do_not_rule_out_tatsunoko_vs_capcom_western_release.html. Retrieved 2009-05-25.  
  2. ^ a b Killian, Seth (2009-09-17). "Introducing Tatsunoko Vs Capcom Game Director Ishizawa-san". Capcom-Unity. Capcom. http://www.capcom-unity.com/s-kill/blog/2009/09/17/introducing_tatsunoko_vs_capcom_game_director_ishizawasan. Retrieved 2009-09-17.  
  3. ^ a b c d "When Heroes Collide". Nintendo Power (United States: Future US): pp. 47, 49-51. July 2009. ISSN 1041-9551.  
  4. ^ "Release Summary: Tatsunoko vs. Capcom". GameSpot. CBS Interactive. http://www.gamespot.com/arcade/action/tatsunokovscapcom/index.html. Retrieved 2009-05-25.  
  5. ^ "Release Summary: Tatsunoko vs. Capcom". GameSpot. CBS Interactive. http://www.gamespot.com/wii/action/tatsunokovscapcom/similar.html?mode=versions. Retrieved 2009-05-25.  
  6. ^ a b c d e Capcom (2009-09-23). "TGS 2009: Tatsunoko VS. Capcom: Ultimate All-Stars, It's Frank West, Baby!". Press release. http://www.capcom-unity.com/jgonzo/blog/2009/09/23/tgs_2009_tatsunoko_vs_capcom_ultimate_allstars_its_frank_west_baby. Retrieved 2009-12-05.  
  7. ^ a b c Killian, Seth. Interview with Ricardo Torres. Tatsunoko vs. Capcom Interview With Seth Killian (Video). GameSpot. 2009-05-27. Retrieved on 2009-05-29.
  8. ^ a b Gifford, Kevin (2008-12-03). "Japan Review Check: Tatsunoko vs. Capcom". 1UP.com. UGO Networks. http://www.1up.com/do/newsStory?cId=3171619. Retrieved 2009-05-25.  
  9. ^ Niizumi, Hirohiko (2008-07-10). "Tatsunoko vs. Capcom Beta Test Hands-On". GameSpot. CBS Interactive. http://www.gamespot.com/arcade/action/tatsunokovscapcom/news.html?sid=6193636. Retrieved 2009-06-04.  
  10. ^ a b c http://n-europe.com/news.php?nid=13261
  11. ^ a b c Capcom (2009-06-02). "E3 09: Five new characters coming to the US Tatsunoko". Press release. http://www.destructoid.com/e3-09-five-new-characters-coming-to-the-us-tatsunoko-134560.phtml. Retrieved 2009-06-04.  
  12. ^ http://wii.ign.com/articles/937/937796p1.html
  13. ^ http://www.famitsu.com/game/news/1231127_1124.html
  14. ^ http://www.capcom-unity.com/jgonzo/blog/2010/01/08/all-new_endings_in_tatsunoko_vs._capcom:_ultimate_all-stars,_courtesy_of_udon_
  15. ^ a b "Tatsunoko vs. Capcom Tech Info". GameSpot. http://www.gamespot.com/wii/action/tatsunokovscapcom/tech_info.html. Retrieved 2009-09-24.  
  16. ^ a b c Niitsuma, Ryota. Interview with Spencer. Tatsunoko vs. Capcom Producer Answers Questions About Online Play, Sequel Possibilities (Transcript). Siliconera at San Diego Comic-Con International. San Diego. July 2009. Retrieved on 2009-08-01.
  17. ^ "Tatsunoko vs. Capcom: Ultimate All-Stars Update- New character reveal". Gamespot. http://www.gamespot.com/wii/action/tatsunokovscapcom/news.html?sid=6217066&mode=previews. Retrieved 2009-09-09.  
  18. ^ a b c Bozon, Mark (2009-10-13). "Character Unveil: Tatsunoko vs. Capcom". IGN. Fox Interactive Media. http://wii.ign.com/articles/103/1034545p1.html. Retrieved 2009-10-13.  
  19. ^ Niitsuma, Ryota. Interview with Christian Nutt. Gamasutra Versus Capcom: The Tatsunoko Interview (Transcipt). Gamasutra. 2009-11-09. Retrieved on 2009-11-21.
  20. ^ Tanaka, John (2008-05-22). "Street Fighter Versus Anime". IGN. Fox Interactive Media. http://games.ign.com/articles/875/875970p1.html. Retrieved 2009-05-29.  
  21. ^ Tanaka, John (2008-07-25). "New Tatsunoko VS Capcom Characters". IGN. Fox Interactive Media. http://games.ign.com/articles/893/893800p1.html. Retrieved 2009-05-29.  
  22. ^ Tanaka, John (2008-12-01). "New Minigames Revealed for Tatsunoko VS Capcom". IGN. Fox Interactive Media. http://wii.ign.com/articles/934/934636p1.html. Retrieved 2009-05-29.  
  23. ^ a b Killian, Seth. Interview with Games Radar. E3 09: Tatsunoko vs Capcom - Interview (Audio). GamesRadar. 2009-06-11. Retrieved on 2009-06-16.
  24. ^ IGN Staff (2008-09-17). "Tatsunoko VS Capcom Set for Wii". IGN. Fox Interactive Media. http://wii.ign.com/articles/910/910758p1.html. Retrieved 2009-05-29.  
  25. ^ "第七話:みんなの知りたいこと" (in Japanese). Capcom Japan. 2008-11-28. http://www.capcom.co.jp/tatsucap/column07.html. Retrieved 2009-05-29.  
  26. ^ "Fighting Talk with Ryota Niitsuma, Tatsunoko vs. Capcom's Producer". NGamer. October 2009. pp. 35.  
  27. ^ a b Bozon, Mark (2009-06-03). "E3 2009: Tatsunoku vs. Capcom Hands-on". IGN. Fox Interactive Media. http://wii.ign.com/articles/991/991253p1.html. Retrieved 2009-06-04.  
  28. ^ "Dawn of the Afro". Host: Adam Sessler. X-Play. G4 (TV channel), Los Angeles. 2009-01-23. No. 20090123.
  29. ^ Killian, Seth. Interview with Ben PerLee. Capcom's Seth Killian (Transcript). Destructoid. San Francisco. 2008-12-19. Retrieved on 2009-05-21.
  30. ^ Chris Kramer (2008-05-06). "Capcom (and you!) At E3 2009". Capcom-Unity. Capcom. http://www.capcom-unity.com/kramez/blog/2009/05/06/capcom_and_you_at_e3_2009. Retrieved 2009-05-31.  
  31. ^ Kramer, Chris (2008-05-18). "Capcom E3 Mystery Game #1 revealed in July Nintendo Power". Capcom-Unity. Capcom. http://www.capcom-unity.com/kramez/blog/2009/05/18/capcom_e3_mystery_game_1_revealed_in_july_nintendo_power. Retrieved 2009-05-18.  
  32. ^ Sinclair, Brendan (2009-06-03). "Tatsunoko vs. Capcom might go online, add new fighters". GameSpot. CBS Interactive. http://e3.gamespot.com/story/6211236/tatsunoko-vs-capcom-might-go-online-add-new-fighters. Retrieved 2009-06-04.  
  33. ^ Gantayat, Anoop (2009-09-10). "Tatsunoko VS Capcom Characters Leak Out". IGN. Fox Interactive Media. http://wii.ign.com/articles/102/1023361p1.html. Retrieved 2009-11-23.  
  34. ^ Yin-Poole, Wesley (2009-10-07). "Capcom: No plans for Tatsunoko vs. Capcom XBLA/PSN port". VideoGamer.com. Pro-G. http://www.videogamer.com/news/capcom_no_plans_for_tatsunoko_vs_capcom_xbla_psn_port.html. Retrieved 2010-01-09.  
  35. ^ "Nintendo Wii Japanese Ranking". Japan Game Charts. 2009-06-24. http://www.japan-gamecharts.com/wii.php. Retrieved 2009-07-01.  
  36. ^ "Game Critics Awards - 2009 Winners". Game Critics Awards. http://www.gamecriticsawards.com/winners.html. Retrieved 2009-06-23.  

External links


Strategy wiki

Up to date as of January 23, 2010

From StrategyWiki, the free strategy guide and walkthrough wiki

Tatsunoko vs. Capcom: Ultimate All-Stars
Box artwork for Tatsunoko vs. Capcom: Ultimate All-Stars.
Developer(s) Eighting
Publisher(s) Capcom
Release date(s)
Arcade
 December, 2008
Wii
Cross Generation of Heroes
Ultimate All-Stars
Genre(s) Fighting
System(s) Arcade, Wii
Mode(s) Single player, Multiplayer
Rating(s)
BBFC: 12
CERO: Ages 12 and up
ESRB: Teen
PEGI: Ages 12+

Tatsunoko vs. Capcom: Ultimate All-Stars is a crossover fighting game in development by Eighting and published by Capcom for the Wii gaming console. The title is Capcom's seventh game in the Versus series, and will be released in North America, Japan and Europe in January 2010. The game was originally released exclusively in Japan as Tatsunoko vs. Capcom: Cross Generation of Heroes (タツノコ VS. CAPCOM CROSS GENERATION OF HEROES ?) for video arcades and the Wii in December 2008. Fan reception of the game led Capcom to localize it with help from Tatsunoko Production to deal with licensing issues involving the Tatsunoko characters.

Tatsunoko vs. Capcom features characters from the Japanese animation studio Tatsunoko Production and video game company Capcom. Like traditional fighting games, gameplay consists of attempting to knockout the opponent on a 2D plane. This plane creates a 2.5D environment in conjunction with character models and backgrounds rendered in 3D – a first for the Vs. series. Tatsunoko vs. Capcom's simplified three-button attack system is a departure from Street Fighter and some previous Versus fighting titles since the game was developed with the Wii in mind.

Table of Contents

Tatsunoko vs. Capcom: Ultimate All-Stars/Table of Contents








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