Tchoukball: Wikis

  
  

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Symbol of Tchoukball
Tchoukball match in progress.
Tchoukball match in progress.

Tchoukball (pronounced chukeball) is an indoor team sport developed in the 1970s by Swiss biologist Hermann Brandt, who believed that "The objective of all physical activities is not to make champions, but make a contribution to building a harmonious society". His aim was to develop a team sport which did not involve the horrific injuries which he viewed as plaguing other sports.

The sport is played on an indoor court measuring forty metres by twenty metres (130 feet x 65 feet). At each end there is a 'frame' (a device similar to a trampoline off which the ball bounces) which measures one square metre and a semicircular 'D' measuring three metres (10 feet) out from the frame in all directions. Each team can score on both ends on the field, and comprises twelve players, of which nine may be on the court at any one time. In order to score a point, the ball must be thrown by an attacking player, hit the frame and bounce outside the 'D' without being caught by the defending team. Physical contact is prohibited, and defenders may not attempt to intercept the attacking team's passes. Players may take three steps with the ball, hold the ball for a maximum of three seconds, and teams may not pass the ball more than three times before shooting at the frame.

Tchoukball has come to be an international sport, played in Taiwan, Great Britain, Switzerland, India, Japan, Canada, the United States, Italy, the Czech Republic, Hong Kong, Macau and Singapore. It is governed by the Féderation Internationale de Tchoukball (FITB, founded in 1971). Taiwan hosted the 2004 World Championships and won both the women's and junior championships, with the Swiss men winning the men's championship. The 2006 European Championships were held in Switzerland, with Great Britain taking both the Men's and Under-18's titles, while the hosts won the Ladies event.

Contents

History

Tchoukball was born thanks to the research of Dr. Hermann Brandt, who was concerned by the numerous serious injuries among athletes resulting from sports prone to aggression and physical contact. He believed that sports should not only form champions, but also contribute to the creation of a better and more humane society.[1] Hence the invention of tchoukball, which combines elements of handball (it is played with hands, and the balls used are similar), volleyball (as the defending team must prevent the ball from falling) and squash (since there is a bounce). This sport can be played by anyone at his or her respective level, irrespective of the players sex, age or physical abilities.

Basic rules

Two teams of 9 players each (men or women) compete to score points

  • A player scores a point when he bounces the ball onto either of the two trampolines and it touches the ground outside the semicircle facing the trampoline.
Frame
  • If a player of the attacking team misses the frame, or if the ball touches the ground outside the court before or after the bounce, then the defending team scores a point.
  • Each team can score a point on either of the two trampolines.
  • 1 field of 16x32m and a ball (almost similar to a handball)

Playing the game

  • The player can take 3 steps and is not allowed to bounce the ball on the ground between these steps.
  • The attacking team cannot make more than 3 passes before shooting
  • When a pass is dropped or not completed (i.e. the ball touches the ground), the other team gets possession
  • The defending team cannot hamper the attacking one
  • Touching the ball with one’s feet or legs below the knee is forbidden

International Tchoukball Federation (FITB)

The FITB, founded in 1971, is based in Geneva. It now comprises 13 member associations and 22 affiliated associations (that means it has relations with 35 countries). In spite of limited financial and human resources, it is developing numerous contacts throughout the world. It supports and advises national associations and individuals willing to implant tchoukball in new areas. For instance, tchoukball was recently integrated in the school program of some regions of Senegal.

The international, continental and world tournaments of tchoukball and beach tchoukball are an excellent way to make tchoukball more famous, and the FITB is now trying to enhance the television broadcasting of these competitions, which also creates an additional motivation for the players. The FITB will be integrated in the 2009 World Games, which will take place in Kaohsiung (Taiwan).

International Competitions

Year Competition Host Nation Men Winners Women Winners M-18 Men Winners M-18 Women Winners
1984 World Tchoukball Championships  Republic of China  Republic of China  Republic of China Not Held Not Held
1987 World Tchoukball Championships  Switzerland  Republic of China  Republic of China Not Held Not Held
1989 World Tchoukball Championships  Germany  Republic of China  Republic of China Not Held Not Held
1990 World Tchoukball Championships  United Kingdom  Republic of China  Republic of China Not Held Not Held
2000 World Tchoukball Championships  Switzerland  Republic of China  Republic of China Not Held Not Held
2001 European Tchoukball Championships  Switzerland  United Kingdom  Switzerland Not Held Not Held
2002 World Tchoukball Championships  United Kingdom  Republic of China  Republic of China Not Held Not Held
2003 European Tchoukball Championships  Italy  Switzerland  Switzerland Not Held Not Held
2003 Asian Tchoukball Championships  India  Republic of China  Republic of China Not Held Not Held
2004 World Tchoukball Championships  Republic of China  Switzerland  Republic of China Not Held Not Held
2005 World Beach Tchoukball Championships  Switzerland  Republic of China  Republic of China  Republic of China  Switzerland
2006 European Tchoukball Championships  Switzerland  United Kingdom  Switzerland  United Kingdom Not Held
2006 Asian Tchoukball Championships  Republic of China  Republic of China  Republic of China Not Held Not Held
2006 South American Tchoukball Championships  Argentina  Brazil  Brazil Not Held Not Held
2008 Asian Tchoukball Championships  Hong Kong  Republic of China  Republic of China Not Held Not Held
2008 European Tchoukball Championships  Czech Republic  Switzerland  Switzerland  Switzerland Not Held
2008 South American Tchoukball Championships  Argentina  Brazil  Brazil Not Held Not Held
2009 World Games  Republic of China  Chinese Taipei  Chinese Taipei Not Held Not Held

Notes

  1. ^ Brandt, H., Etude scientifique des sports d’équipe, Ed. Roulet, Geneva, 1971)

External links

Associations

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