The Full Wiki

More info on Ted Sizemore

Ted Sizemore: Wikis

Advertisements
  

Note: Many of our articles have direct quotes from sources you can cite, within the Wikipedia article! This article doesn't yet, but we're working on it! See more info or our list of citable articles.

Encyclopedia

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Ted Sizemore
Second baseman
Born: April 15, 1945 (1945-04-15) (age 64)
Gadsden, Alabama
Batted: Right Threw: Right 
MLB debut
April 7, 1969 for the Los Angeles Dodgers
Last MLB appearance
May 27, 1980 for the Boston Red Sox
Career statistics
Batting average     .262
Hits     1,311
Runs batted in     430
Teams
Career highlights and awards

Ted Crawford Sizemore (born April 15, 1945 in Gadsden, Alabama) was a second baseman for Major League Baseball's Los Angeles Dodgers (1969-70 and 1976), St. Louis Cardinals (1971-75), Philadelphia Phillies (1977-78), Chicago Cubs (1979) and the Boston Red Sox (1979-80).

In 1969 he was named NL Rookie of the Year and finished 30th in voting for the NL MVP.

In 1973 he led the National League in Sacrifice Hits with 25.

He helped the Phillies to win the NL Eastern Division in 1977 and 1978.

Sizemore grounded into a league-leading 25 double plays in 1977 which tied the Phillies single season record set by Del Ennis in 1950.

In his first American League game as a member of the Red Sox he went 3 for 3 with 2 RBIs.

In 12 seasons he played in 1,411 games, had 5,011 at bats, 577 runs, 1,311 hits, 188 doubles, 21 triples, 23 home runs, 430 RBI, 59 stolen bases, 469 walks, a .262 batting average, a .325 on-base percentage, a .321 slugging percentage, 1,610 total bases, 110 sacrifice hits, 38 sacrifice flies and 60 intentional walks.

After Sizemore's retirement as a player, he went to work for baseball glove manufacturer Rawlings, as their chief liaison with major league players.[1]

External links

References

  1. ^ Boyle, Matthew. "Luxury baseball: The $400 glove", Fortune (reprinted at CNN.com), published August 24, accessed August 25.
Preceded by
Johnny Bench
National League Rookie of the Year
1969
Succeeded by
Carl Morton
Advertisements

Advertisements






Got something to say? Make a comment.
Your name
Your email address
Message