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Telemundo
The current logo of Telemundo
Type Spanish-language Broadcast Television Network
Country Puerto Rico, United States (the signal is capted in Mexico in frontier cities)

Headquarters: Hialeah, Florida

Availability International
Founded
by Ángel Ramos
Slogan "Atrévete a más" ("dare for more")
Area United States, Canada, Mexico and Puerto Rico
Owner NBC Universal
MSN (website with MSN Latino)
Launch date 1954 as WKAQ-TV in San Juan, Puerto Rico
1987 in the continental United States (KVEA of Los Angeles was the first Telemundo-owned & operated station launched in 1985).
Former names None
Official Website www.telemundo.com

Telemundo is an American television network owned and founded by Ángel Ramos, who launched the brand with a TV station in San Juan, Puerto Rico in 1954—and it evolved into the second-largest Spanish-language content producer in the world.[1] It is also the second-largest Spanish language network in the United States, behind Univision.

Telemundo is the only Spanish-language network producing most of its telenovelas.[2] Unlike Univision, many programs on Telemundo air with closed captions in both Spanish and English. Univision only has Spanish captions. The network reaches 93 percent of U.S. Hispanic households in 142 markets via over-the-air, cable and satellite TV.[3] An average of 1,035,000 total viewers (aged 2 and older) tuned in for its weekday prime time lineup during 2007.[4] Telemundo is headquartered at 2290 West 8th Avenue in Hialeah, a Miami, Florida suburb.[5]

Telemundo Communications Group, its parent company, is part of the NBC Universal division of General Electric, which paid $2.7 billion for the operation in 2002. Don Browne is Telemundo's president. Jeff Gaspin, who is president and COO of Universal Television Group, oversees the network. Telemundo has 1,800 employees.[6]

Contents

History

1954–1987

Angel Ramos - Founder

WKAQ-TV launched the Telemundo brand on March 28, 1954. The station was founded by Ángel Ramos, owner of "El Mundo," Puerto Rico's main newspaper at the time, and Puerto Rico's first radio station, WKAQ-AM, also known as "Radio El Mundo". Ramos wanted to maintain a consistent branding between its properties using the "mundo" theme (Spanish for "world"), and thus named WKAQ-TV Telemundo (in effect, "Teleworld" or "World TV"). He had tried to obtain a TV license as early as the mid 1940s, but due to an FCC licensing freeze for all new American TV stations, Ramos had to wait until 1954 to obtain the license.[7]

In the beginning, Ramos maintained continuity between his radio and television stations by signing an exclusive deal with the most famous and influential actor/comedian/producer in Puerto Rico, Ramón Rivero, better known as Diplo, whose "Tremendo Hotel" was the most popular radio show in the history of radio in Puerto Rico (broadcast through WKAQ Radio). It was Ramón Rivero who produced the first comedy/variety television shows for WKAQ Telemundo, La Taberna India, then La Farándula Corona; shows that catapulted WKAQ to the top of the ratings.

During the 1970s and 1980s, WKAQ-TV (then branded as Telemundo Canal 2) was a major producer of Puerto Rican Spanish soap operas. The channel was also known by its "fingers" logo (a bold number 2 with the silhouette of two upright fingers inside the number), calling itself "El canal de los dedos" (the channel of the fingers).

1985–1987

In 1985, Estrella Communications, owned by Joe Wallach, Paul Niedermeyer and Reliance Group Holdings, purchased KVEA in Los Angeles. It became the first full-time independent Spanish language station in Los Angeles. The next year, Reliance acquired the Telemundo brand when it purchased Blair Broadcasting. The purchase included WSCV in Ft. Lauderdale/Miami, Puerto Rico's WKAQ-TV (known for decades as "Telemundo Canal 2"). In late 1986, Reliance purchased New Jersey station WNJU serving the New York City metropolitan area.

Late '80s era Telemundo logo from 1987 to late 1992

In 1987, Saul Steinberg and Henry Silverman of Reliance Capital Group merged all these stations into the Telemundo Group.[4] The new corporation quickly went public and launched the Telemundo network. Later that year, it purchased additional stations in San Francisco, Houston and San Antonio.

Expansion

Between 1988 and 1991, Telemundo acquired stations in Texas, New Mexico, Arizona and Washington. The network decided to outsource their news division in 1988; CNN to produced two newscasts, branded "Noticiero Telemundo CNN". Produced in Atlanta, "Noticiero Telemundo CNN" was anchored by Jorge Gestoso and María Elvira Salazar. Lana Montalbán, who anchored the show known then as Telemundo HBC, returned to New York City where she anchored the WNJU newscast for four years. After that she went back to her native Argentina where she continued to work for local networks for ten more years. When Salazar decided to take a reporter's position at Noticiero Univision in Miami, in her place, Chilean former Miss Universe Cecilia Bolocco joined Gestoso. The final incarnation produced in Atlanta was co-anchored by Patricia Janiot.

In 1994, Telemundo caught the fever of producing 24 hour news. The network launched Telenoticias partnering with Argentina's Artear Network, Antena 3 from Spain, and Reuters. The venture was not successful and the service was sold to CBS. Rebranded as CBS Telenoticias, the network did air all over the Americas.

CBS Telenoticias was sold back to Telemundo and the network branded it Telemundo Internacional.

1992–1998

In 1992, Telemundo went through another management change under former Univision president Joaquin Blaya. Mr.Blaya, who fled from Univison with four other executives to run telemundo Network, Blaya at such time, could not conviced other executives from Univision to follow him, like Ray Rodriguez, who later became Univision President, Miguel Banojian http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Miguel_Banojian who later was accredited for turning around Univision's most important TV Station KMEX-34 in Los Angeles,http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/univision Richard Ramimez, GM of WXTV and others, stayed behind at Univision and refused to follow Blaya to Telemundo. The next year, Telemundo branded themselves with the campaign, Arriba, Telemundo, Arriba. Around the same time the famed Telemundo "T" logo was introduced.

Telemundo "T" logo used between 1993 and 1999

In 1993, Telemundo began the ongoing practice of producing original telenovelas. The first soaps were "Angelica, mi vida", "Marielena", "Guadalupe", "Señora Tentación", and "Tres Destinos". International markets and syndicators soon courted these shows. Telemundo's effort face an initial setback, when Mexico's industry leader, Televisa, bought Capitalvision, the production house that had been making the new soap operas.

In 1995, under the direction of Harry Abraham Castillo, the network's Executive Vice-President of Programming, Telemundo opened its first network studio on the West Coast. On the Raleigh Studios lot in Hollywood, three shows began daily production. La Hora Lunática hosted by LA radio personality Humberto Luna; El y Ella created and hosted by Gigi Graciette; a daily talkshow and Dando y Dando, a gameshow hosted by Rafael Sigler.

1998–2001

In 1998, Telemundo was bought by a partnership between cable's Liberty Media and entertainment conglomerate Sony Pictures Entertainment. Helmed by yet another management team under the leadership of former CBS executive Peter Tortoricci, hopes of attracting the bilingual market were explored. Lo mejor de los dos Mundos ("The best of both worlds") campaign was launched. Several billboards went up in cities such as Miami and San Francisco heralding a "new era" for Telemundo. Former CBS News Vice President, Joe Peyronnin, founded Telemundo's network news division 1999 and served as its Executive Vice-President until 2006.

After Mr. Tortoricci’s resignation Telemundo was lead by Jim Mc Namara as CEO and Alan Sokol as COO. Their programming strategy followed a more traditional approach to Spanish language Television than their predecessors, incorporating several telenovelas from Colombia and Brazil and entertainment programs. It was under Mc Namara that Telemundo incorporated the programs “Laura En America” hosted by Peruvian Lawyer Laura Bozzo, Betty La Fea starring Ana Maria Orozco, A Oscuras Pero Encendidos hosted by Paul Bouche, “Xica” starring Tais Araujo, The Spanish format Numeros Rojos, and the argentine format “Agrandaditos”.[8]

2001–Present-Future

The current logo of Telemundo

On April 12, 2002, Telemundo was purchased by NBC and is now a part of NBC Universal. Jim MacNamara remained at the helm of the network during and after the sale. Their main competitor, Univision, continues to have an upper hand in the ratings wars, although not in all time slots. Local stations began producing early morning news to be more competitive in their respective markets. Also at that time the Telemundo "T" logo received an overhaul. Telemundo produces far more programming than Univision and does not rely strictly on Mexican and Venezuelan shows. In contrast, Univisión's schedule is heavy on Mexican and Venezuelan shows due to long-term exclusive deals with media giants Televisa and Venevisión. After three years, NBC officials asked MacNamara to resign and replaced him with Don Browne who had been head of the NBC affiliate WTVJ in Miami.

News programs were created in the wake of 9/11. "Hoy en el Mundo," anchored by Marian de la Fuente and Jose Diaz Balart, went on the air informing viewers of national and international events. This program along with its companion show "De Mañanita" were cancelled by the much heralded arrival of Maria Antonieta Collins from Univisión. "Cada Día con Maria Antonieta" went on the air in October 2005. She continued to host the program along with the much recycled Diaz Balart as co-host. Balart was anchor of Telemundo's morning news program called "Noticero Telemundo Primera Hora," which is now anchored by Ana Patrica Candelani. (Previous attempts anchored by Diaz Balart were "Esta Manana" and the aforementioned "Hoy en el Mundo.") In an interview in "People En Espanol," Collins announced that she will leave Telemundo when her contract expires in August and that she wishes to return to news anchoring.

On May 28, 2008 Don Browne announced that "Cada Dia" would be cancelled on May 30. The show was reportedly canceled due to low ratings and 50 employees were fired. It was replaced by a new morning show called "Levantate" which airs live from Telemundo's WKAQ TV, with segments out of its Hialeah HQ, and also out of New York,Los Angeles,and Mexico studios

In 2004, Telemundo created Telemundo Television Studios in Miami, Florida. The network also began subtitling many of their telenovelas into English via closed captioning. Under NBC, Telemundo gave greater emphasis to original programming and product placement. The network currently spends $100 million a year producing its own shows.[6]

In March 2007, NBC Universal announced that it had restructured Telemundo's entertainment division in an effort to narrow Univision's ratings dominance.[9] Starting in the fall of 2007, the network was to have cut the first commercial break in every prime-time show to only 60 seconds in length.[10] It also plans to air the 2008 series Idolos de Juventud uninterrupted, using pervasive product placement instead of traditional ad spots.[11] NBC also announced that they were going to dispose of the original Telemundo station in Puerto Rico Channel 2 and Los Angeles' KWHY to finance the acquisition of Oxygen Media.

On 21 December 2007, NBC Universal announced that WKAQ-TV was no longer for sale, indicating that Telemundo Puerto Rico would stay within the NBC family.[12]

On March 18, 2008 Grupo Televisa and NBC-Universal announced a 10-year multiplatform agreement that would allow 1000 hours of Telemundo programming including news, entertainment, specials and sports to be broadcast over not only its Televisa free-to-air channels, but also its SKY Channel and cable system starting in April, as well as a planned Telemundo pay channel to be launched later this year. On October 8, 2008, Hillary Hattler the station's president gathered several employees and offered them a "retirement plan", this initiative gathered criticism from most of those present in the reunion.[13]

On November 14, 2008 it was announced that Telemundo would end its two year online relationship with Yahoo! in January 1, 2009 to launch a standalone hub at telemundo.com, with Microsoft as content distributor.[14]

On April 23, 2009 Telemundo became the first U.S.-based Spanish-language network to begin airing its prime-time programming in 1080i 16:9 high definition. Initially, Telemundo O&Os in nine markets (New York, Los Angeles, Chicago, Dallas-Fort Worth, San Francisco, Houston, Miami, Las Vegas and Puerto Rico) air Telemundo programming in HD. The remaining O&Os will phase in HD programming over the next twelve months. It is currently unknown if and when third-party-owned affiliates will follow suit. Coming soon, more new Telemundo Owned-and-operated television stations in the U.S. will expand to have new stations in Indianapolis, Detroit, and Cleveland.

On May 18, 2009 it was announced that Telemundo and Televisa will launch a joint owned network in Mexico in August 2009. The new network was launch in August and is available on cable and satellite in Mexico.

Programming

Primetime/daytime schedule

Telemundo airs its 8-11 pm (ET/PT) weekday programs (usually telenovelas) using a form of the Turner Time scheduling strategy used by TBS from 1981 until 1997. Each program starts a few minutes after its officially scheduled time, typically three or four minutes after the hour. Shows also bleed over into the next time slot. This encourages viewers to stay tuned to Telemundo instead of joining another channel's program in progress. The 11 pm news broadcasts start at the conventional time, however. The reverse is the case on weekends when football matches are aired, when all programs airing prior to the game are aired five minutes before the hour/half-hour; on weekend days when football matches are not aired, regularly scheduled programming is aired in their conventional timeslots.

Telemundo is the only Spanish network providing English subtitles of most prime time shows as closed captions on CC3. These subtitles are also available in HD on digital service 2.

Movies are in red; Reality/Game Shows are in green; Sports are in yellow; Primetime Talk Shows are in blue; Telenovelas are in purple.

7:00 PM 7:30 PM 8:00 PM 8:30 PM 9:00 PM 9:30 PM 10:00 PM 10:30 PM
Sunday Cine en Familia Cine Millonario
Monday 12 Corazones El Clon Perro Amor ¿Dónde Está Elisa?
Tuesday
Wednesday
Thursday
Friday
Saturday Mexican Football Soccer or specials Mexican Football Soccer or specials

Coming Soon in 2010

La Reina del Sur (Telenovela) w/ Kate del Castillo, and Guy Ecker
Casanova Sin Amor w/ Miguel Varoni, Sara Corrales and Katie Barberi
Mis Tres Hermanas w/ Elizabeth Gutierrez, Maritza Rodriguez, Gaby Espino and Christian Meier - (2010)
Playa Salvaje w/ Genesis Rodriguez, Arap Bethke and Lupita Ferrer - (2010-2011)
Yo Amo a Paquita Gallego w/ Carmen Villalobos and Mauricio Ochmann - (2010-2011)

English Subtitles

Screen bug

Telemundo is the only US Spanish-language network to provide English subtitles of its weekday prime-time programming. They appear as closed captions on CC3 in standard definition and digital service 2 in HDTV. The network produces the translations in-house and intends them to attract Hispanic viewers who may not be fluent in Spanish.[15] Programs appear with a special digital on-screen graphic at the start of each episode (see right).

Currently Telemundo includes English subtitles in the network feed of all three of prime-time telenovelas. Programs which had English captions during their original broadcast will also have them in repeats. Some programs (notably the long-running anthology, Decisiones), have translations in some episodes but not others, depending on when they were produced. Availability of English subtitles is limited to the technical capacity of the local station, cable or satellite provider, or other outlet to pass them on.

The captions premiered with La Cenicienta and Amor Descarado on September 8, 2003.[15] This generated a small, loyal fan base among English-speaking viewers.[16] Subtitles briefly disappeared without notice starting October 14, 2008, amid budget cuts at Telemundo. The network cited the need to concentrate resources on its core Spanish-speaking audience, but soon reversed the cancellation due to popular demand.[16] They began reappearing on March 30, 2009.

See also


Notes

  1. ^ Breaking News - In Landmark Move, NBC Universal Television Group Signs Development Deal With Galan Entertainment For Production Of Telenovelas In English Across Its Many Networks | Thefutoncritic.Com
  2. ^ Clorox and Wal-Mart Team up With Telemundo on New Episodes of Dame Chocolate Telenovela
  3. ^ Breaking News - In Landmark Move, Nbc Universal Television Group Signs Development Deal With Galan Entertainment For Production Of Telenovelas In English Across Its Many Networks | Thefutoncritic.Com
  4. ^ [1]
  5. ^ "Legal corporate english." Telemundo. Retrieved on February 3, 2009.
  6. ^ a b NBC tacks on Telemundo oversight to Gaspin's tasks - The Spanish-language network has been unable to attract a higher audience share since its acquisition. - Los Angeles Times
  7. ^ "Corporate Information." Telemundo. Retrieved on February 3, 2009.
  8. ^ Sutter, Mary. Telemundo sets fall sked. Variety, May 16, 2000. Retrieved 2008-02-24.
  9. ^ Telemundo divisions to be revamped - Entertainment News, TV News, Media - Variety
  10. ^ http://www.nbcumv.com/telemundo/release_detail.nbc/telemundo-20070604000000-telemundoreformats.html?rss=1
  11. ^ http://nbcumv.com/telemundo/release_detail.nbc/telemundo-20070524000000-telemundopresentsf.html
  12. ^ WKAQ-TV "Telenoticias a las 5:00 P.M." in a short message by Don Browne (NBC/Telemundo Network president).
  13. ^ Rosalina Marrero-Rodríguez (2008-10-10). "¿Telemundo los quiere retirar temprano?" (in Spanish). Primera Hora. http://www.primerahora.com/noticia/otros_asi/espectaculos_asi/¿telemundo_los_quiere_retirar_temprano?/237639. Retrieved 2008-10-11. 
  14. ^ http://finance.yahoo.com/news/Telemundo-Drops-Yahoo-For-paidcontent-13601161.html
  15. ^ a b [2]
  16. ^ a b [3]

External links








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