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Television systems before 1940: Wikis

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A number of experimental and broadcast pre World War II television systems were tested. The first ones were mechanical based (mechanical TV) and of very low resolution, sometimes with no sound. Later TV systems were electronic (electronic TV).

Contents

France

  • France 1932 (mechanical): 60 lines, 12.5 frame/s, 3:7 vertical aspect ratio, vertical scanning ~35x60 pixels per frame, sound, live images
  • France 1935: 375 lines, abandoned 1936
  • France 1935-1939 (electronic): 455 lines
  • France 1943-1956 (electronic): 441 lines

Germany

  • Doberitz 1932 (mechanical): 48 lines, 25 frame/s, 4:3 horizontal aspect ratio, ~64x48 pixels per frame, sound, talking movies
  • Berlin R.P.Z. 1932 (mechanical): 60 lines, 25 frame/s, 4:3 horizontal aspect ratio, ~83x60 pixels per frame, test movies and live images
  • Germany 1932: 90 lines
  • Germany 1935: 180 lines
  • Germany 1937: 441 lines, 25 frame/s, line frequency 11025 Hz. Vision 46.0 MHz Sound 43.2 MHz.
  • Germany 1940: 1.000 lines signal projection, no glass screen but projection screen (successful experiments in Reichspost labors, but no mass production, note that in Germany public telegraphy, telephone, and radio services were subject to the Reichspostministerium since the early 20th century, and TV was regarded a postal issue as well until the 1980s)

Netherlands

  • Netherlands 1930s: 441 lines, 25 frame/s, line frequency 11025 Hz
  • Late 1940s: 567 lines

Poland

  • Warsaw 1937 (mechanical): 120 lines, test movies and live images from a studio
  • Electronic TV (343 lines) was under development and was publicly demonstrated during the Radio Exhibition in Warsaw in August 1939, regular operations planned to start at the beginning of 1940, work stopped because of the outbreak of World War II.

Switzerland

  • Switzerland 1932 (mechanical): 30 lines, 16.6 frame/s, 4:3 horizontal aspect ratio, ~40x30 pixels per frame, test movies and live images

Italy

During the 1930s there were also experimental transmissions from the Vatican - but further details are unknown

  • Italy 1932 (mechanical): 60 lines, 20 frame/s, 4:3 horizontal aspect ratio, ~45x60 pixels per frame, test movies and live images
  • Italy 1937 (electronic): 375 lines, 25 frame/s, 4:3 horizontal aspect ratio, daily from Rome, between 6pm and 9.30pm on 6.9 meters with a power of 2 kW
  • Italy 1939 (electronic): 441 lines, 25 frame/s, 4:3 horizontal aspect ratio, regular service from Rome and Milan. 2 kW transmission power on VHF 45 MHz

UK

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Mechanical

  • England 1926 (Baird mechanical): 30 lines, 5 frame/s, black-and-white experimental transmissions
  • England 1928 (Baird mechanical): 30 lines, 5 frame/s, first experimental color TV transmissions
  • London 1932 (Baird mechanical) : 30 lines, 12.5 frame/s, 3:7 vertical aspect ratio, vertical scanning, ~70x30 pixels per frame, sound, live TV from studio
  • England 1936 (Baird): 240 lines, 25 frame/s, line frequency 6000 Hz, used from November 1936 to February 1937

Electronic

  • UK (1936, EMI): 405 lines / 50 Hz. Used from November 1936 to 1985.
    • The EMI 405 lines system (1938-1939) was the first to have an ITU System Letter Designation.
    • The EMI system is officially known as System A. As the EMI system predates PAL, there is no PAL designator in the ITU television system table.

USSR

  • USSR 1932 (mechanical): 30 lines, 12.5 frame/s, 4:3 horizontal aspect ratio, ~40x30 pixels per frame, test movies and live images

North America

See also

Individual television stations

Broadcast television systems

Related topics in television systems

External links


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