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Telli Hasan Pasha
Born c.1530
Unknown
Died 1593 or c.1610
North of Senj, Croatia or Bosnia

Telli Hasan Pasha (born c.1530 - died 1593/c.1610) was an Ottoman beylerbey of Bosnia who led an invasion of Croatia during the Ottoman wars in Europe.

Invasion of Croatia

Ottoman-controlled Bosnia during Telli Hasan Pasha's lifetime

In 1592, Ottoman Sultan Murad III ordered a force of approximately twenty-thousand Ottoman janissaries to invade Croatia, which was then under the rule of the Austrian Empire, despite the fact that the two nations had signed a nine-year peace treaty in 1590. His goal was to seize the important town of Senj and its port and to elimate the Uskoci, anti-Ottoman Croatian Hapsburg soldiers and pirates who had engaged in guerilla warfare against the Ottomans. To lead this force, he selected his beylerbey of Bosnia, Telli Hasan Pasha.

Pasha assembled his soldiers and advanced into Croatia. At first, they met little resistance, allowing them to capture numerous Uskoci settlements, where they enslaved or slaughtered the entire population and burned the settlement. His forces soon besieged and captured Senj and exterminated the Uskoci population. For his successes, Pasha was awarded the title of "Vizier" by the Sultan. However, the following year, Pasha decided to advanced further into Croatia. His force of some twenty-thousand was soundly defeated and ultimately dispersed in a rout. Pasha is often considered to have died leading the battle's climactic counter-charge. However, other sources state that he survived the struggle, returned to Bosnia as governor, participating in future campaigns against the Uskoci and the Austrians, and ultimately dying of natural causes around 1610.

References

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