Temper: Wikis

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Encyclopedia

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Temperare (to mix correctly) is the Latin origin of words like "temperature" and "tempering"; it and "tempo" come, in turn, from tempus (time or season). Thus, the word "temper" can refer (at least informally) to any time- and temperature-sensitive process (as for chocolate tempering or tempered glass), a material's thermo-mechanical history, or even its composition.

Contents

Temper

Music

Temperament

  • Temperament, in psychology, the general nature of an individual's personality
  • Musical temperament, a tuning system which allows fixed-pitch instruments, such as the piano, greater flexibility in changing keys
  • The Well-Tempered Clavier, a composition by Bach

Tempered

Tempering

  • Tempering, in metallurgy, a heat treatment technique for metals and alloys; also a method for producing tempered glass
  • Tempering, in cooking, refers to the frying of spices (particularly in the cuisines of South Asia) to release their aroma; called chaunk in Hindi, or Tadka.
  • Chocolate tempering, a method of increasing the shine and durability of chocolate couverture

1911 encyclopedia

Up to date as of January 14, 2010

From LoveToKnow 1911

TEMPER (from Lat. temperare, to mingle or compound in due proportion, to qualify, rule, regulate, to be moderate, formed from tempus, time, fit or due season), to blend, modify, or qualify by mixing, to combine in due proportions, hence to restrain, calm. A specific application of the word is to the bringing of steel or other metal to a proper hardness and elasticity (see Metal and Iron And Steel). The word is also used as a substantive, especially in the transferred sense of disposition or frame of mind, generally with some qualifying epithet, but when used absolutely signifying a hasty, passionate temper, or display of such.


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Wiktionary

Up to date as of January 15, 2010
(Redirected to temper article)

Definition from Wiktionary, a free dictionary

Contents

English

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Etymology

From Middle English temperen < Old English *temprian < Latin temperare (to divide or proportion duly, mingle in due proportion, qualify, temper, regulate, rule, intr. observe measure, be moderate or temperate) < tempus (time, fit season); see temporal.

Pronunciation

Noun

Singular
temper

Plural
tempers

temper (plural tempers)

  1. A tendency to anger or lose patience easily.
    He has quite a temper when dealing with salespeople.
  2. State of mind.
    • 1719- Daniel Defoe, Robinson Crusoe
      ...I must testify, from my experience, that a temper of peace, thankfulness, love, and affection, is much the more proper frame for prayer than that of terror and discomposure...
  3. The heat treatment to which a metal or other material has been subjected; a material that has undergone a particular heat treatment.

Derived terms

Translations

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

Verb

Infinitive
to temper

Third person singular
tempers

Simple past
tempered

Past participle
tempered

Present participle
tempering

to temper (third-person singular simple present tempers, present participle tempering, simple past and past participle tempered)

  1. To moderate or control.
    Temper your language around children.
  2. To heat-treat a material, particularly a metal.
    Next, temper the steel by dropping the white hot metal into cold water.
  3. To mix clay, plaster or mortar with water to obtain the proper consistency

Translations

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

External links

  • temper in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913
  • temper in The Century Dictionary, The Century Co., New York, 1911

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