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TUJ's Azabu Hall

Temple University, Japan Campus (Abbreviated: TUJ, Japanese: テンプル大学ジャパンキャンパス) is an international campus of Temple University in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. TUJ has classrooms and student facilities in two buildings in Minato, Tokyo, Japan. It is the oldest and largest campus of any foreign university in Japan, with an estimated 1,286 matriculated students, of which approximately one-half are Japanese and one-half are from the United States and more than 40 other countries. Of this number, 851 are undergraduates, and 435 are in graduate programs (48 MBA, 154 Law School and 233 TESOL). Non-degree enrollment is about 978, and there are approximately 987 enrollees in continuing education programs. [1]

The campus offers B.A. (11 majors), M.S.Ed., Ed.D., MBA and LL.M programs, and also offers semester and year-long study abroad programs for U.S. undergraduates and law students (the latter is the first American Bar Association-accredited study abroad program in Asia). In addition, TUJ has non-degree English-language, continuing (adult) education, and corporate education programs.

Source: Temple University

Contents

Gaining Current Status in Japan

James Zumwalt, Charge d'Affaires, spoke at the Graduation Ceremony. (June, 2009)

After extended negotiations involving the U.S. and Japanese governments, in February 2005 TUJ became the first recognized foreign university campus (外国大学日本校, gaikoku daigaku nihonkō) in Japan. As a result, its credits and degrees are recognized as being equivalent to those of Japanese universities (while still being regular Temple University credits and degrees) and it can sponsor visas for international students. TUJ students are also given Japanese student identification cards and can obtain student discounts on train passes, mobile phone contracts, and other items.

The one remaining issue of contention between TUJ and the Japanese government is that TUJ is taxed as a for-profit company, even though the main campus is a non-profit, state university. This puts a significant financial burden on TUJ and its students.


Source: Temple University

Programs Offered

Student Housing

TUJ offers guaranteed housing for all first semester international students. The school operates two dormitories, a student shared house, and several apartments.

Campus Facilities

TUJ is equipped with several computer labs; a library with over 50,000 books, 300 journal subscriptions and access to an extensive online collection; a Career Development Office; a Counseling Office; an audio production studio; video editing capabilities and a Teaching and Learning Center providing free tutoring to students.

Additional Information

References

  1. ^ "Temple University Japan Fact Sheet". http://www.tuj.ac.jp/about/pdf/factsheet.pdf.  

Coordinates: 35°38′54.65″N 139°44′10.44″E / 35.6485139°N 139.7362333°E / 35.6485139; 139.7362333

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Temple University, Japan Campus (Abbreviated: TUJ, Japanese: テンプル大学ジャパンキャンパス) is an international campus of Temple University in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. TUJ has classrooms and student facilities in two buildings in Minato, Tokyo, Japan. It is the oldest and largest campus of any foreign university in Japan, with an estimated 1,286 matriculated students, of which approximately one-half are Japanese and one-half are from the United States and more than 40 other countries. Of this number, 851 are undergraduates, and 435 are in graduate programs (48 MBA, 154 Law School and 233 TESOL). Non-degree enrollment is about 978, and there are approximately 987 enrollees in continuing education programs.[1]

The campus offers B.A. (11 majors), M.S.Ed., Ed.D., MBA and LL.M programs, and also offers semester and year-long study abroad programs for U.S. undergraduates and law students (the latter is the first American Bar Association-accredited study abroad program in Asia). In addition, TUJ has non-degree English-language, continuing (adult) education, and corporate education programs.

Source: Temple University

Contents

Gaining Current Status in Japan

File:James Zumwalt
James Zumwalt, Chargé d'affaires, spoke at the Graduation Ceremony. (June, 2009)

After extended negotiations involving the U.S. and Japanese governments, in February 2005 TUJ became the first recognized foreign university campus (外国大学日本校, gaikoku daigaku nihonkō) in Japan. As a result, its credits and degrees are recognized as being equivalent to those of Japanese universities (while still being regular Temple University credits and degrees) and it can sponsor visas for international students. TUJ students are also given Japanese student identification cards and can obtain student discounts on train passes, mobile phone contracts, and other items.

The one remaining issue of contention between TUJ and the Japanese government is that TUJ is taxed as a for-profit company, even though the main campus is a non-profit, state university. This puts a significant financial burden on TUJ and its students.


Source: Temple University

Programs Offered

Student Housing

TUJ offers guaranteed housing for all first semester international students. The school operates two dormitories, a student shared house, and several apartments.

Campus Facilities

TUJ is equipped with several computer labs; a library with over 50,000 books, 300 journal subscriptions and access to an extensive online collection; a Career Development Office; a Counseling Office; an audio production studio; video editing capabilities and a Teaching and Learning Center providing free tutoring to students.

Additional information

References

  1. ^ "Temple University Japan Fact Sheet". http://www.tuj.ac.jp/about/pdf/factsheet.pdf. 

Coordinates: 35°38′54.65″N 139°44′10.44″E / 35.6485139°N 139.7362333°E / 35.6485139; 139.7362333


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