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"Tennessee Flat Top Box"
Single by Johnny Cash
from the album Ring of Fire: The Best of Johnny Cash
B-side "Tall Men"[1]
Released December 1961
Format 7" single
Genre Country
Label Columbia #42147
Writer(s) Johnny Cash
Johnny Cash singles chronology
"The Rebel Johnny Yuma"
(1961)
"Tennessee Flat Top Box"
(1961)
"The Big Battle"
(1962)

"Tennessee Flat Top Box" is a song written and recorded by American country music singer Johnny Cash. It was released as a single in late 1961, reaching #11 on the Billboard country singles charts and #84 on the pop charts.[1]

Contents

Chart performance

Chart (1961) Peak
position
U.S. Billboard Hot Country Singles 11
U.S. Billboard Hot 100 84


Rosanne Cash version

"Tennessee Flat Top Box"
Single by Rosanne Cash
from the album King's Record Shop
B-side "Why Don't You Quit Leaving Me Alone"[2]
Released late 1987
Format 7" single
Genre Country
Length 3:12
Label Columbia #07624
Writer(s) Johnny Cash
Producer Rodney Crowell
Rosanne Cash singles chronology
"The Way We Make a Broken Heart"
(1987)
"Tennessee Flat Top Box"
(1987)
"It's Such a Small World"
(1988)

Cash's daughter Rosanne Cash recorded a cover version of "Tennessee Flat Top Box" in 1987 on her album King's Record Shop. Released in late 1987 as that album's third single, it was also the third of four consecutive #1 country hits from that album,[2] peaking in February 1988. Randy Scruggs played the acoustic guitar solos on it.[3]

Rosanne Cash recorded the song at the suggestion of her then-husband, Rodney Crowell. When she recorded the song, she was unaware that her father wrote it, and assumed that it was in the public domain.[4] Johnny later told Rosanne that her success with the song was "one of [his] greatest fulfillments."[4] The Rolling Stone Encyclopedia of Rock & Roll cited Rosanne's cover as a "healing of her strained relationship with her dad."[5]

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Chart performance

Chart (1987–1988) Peak
position
U.S. Billboard Hot Country Singles 1
Canadian RPM Country Tracks 1
Preceded by
"Wheels" by Restless Heart
Billboard Hot Country Singles
number-one single

February 13, 1988
Succeeded by
"Twinkle, Twinkle Lucky Star" by Merle Haggard
RPM Country Tracks
number-one single

February 20, 1988

References


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