Terry Everett: Wikis

Advertisements
  

Note: Many of our articles have direct quotes from sources you can cite, within the Wikipedia article! This article doesn't yet, but we're working on it! See more info or our list of citable articles.

Encyclopedia

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Terry Everett


Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Alabama's 2nd district
In office
January 3, 1993 – January 3, 2009
Preceded by Bill Dickinson
Succeeded by Bobby Bright

Born February 15, 1937 (1937-02-15) (age 72)
Dothan, Alabama
Political party Republican
Spouse(s) Barbara Pitts Everett
Residence Enterprise, Alabama
Alma mater Enterprise State Jr College
Occupation journalist, real estate executive
Religion Baptist
Military service
Service/branch United States Air Force
Years of service 1955-1959

Robert Terry Everett (born February 15, 1937) is an American politician, who was a Republican member of the United States House of Representatives since 1993, representing Alabama's 2nd congressional district.

On September 26, 2007, Everett announced his intention to retire at the end of the 110th Congress.[1] He was succeeded by Bobby Bright, who is the first Democrat to represent the district since 1965.

Contents

Life & political career

Everett was born in Dothan as the oldest son of a sharecropper and railroad worker. Both of his parents died at an early age, and Everett had to work two jobs to help his two brothers and sister. After graduating high school, he served four years in the Air Force as an intelligence specialist in Europe, where he learned Russian, and then worked a sports and police beat reporter for the Dothan Eagle. He eventually became owner of a chain of newspapers in the Southeast, as well as a large farm and a real estate development. He sold all but one of his holdings in 1988.

In 1992, Bill Dickinson announced his retirement from Congress, having served the 2nd District since 1964. It was widely expected that the race to succeed him would be between Democratic state treasurer George Wallace, Jr., the son of the former governor, and Republican state senator Larry Dixon from Montgomery. However, Everett upset Dixon in the Republican primary, winning by 15 points largely by dominating the area of the district outside Montgomery. In November, he defeated Wallace by just under two points (3,500 votes) in November. Everett probably wouldn't have won if not for redistricting changes that moved most of Montgomery's black residents to the 7th District to create a minority-majority district. Indeed, Dickinson had only won a 14th term in 1990 by only two points. Everett was reelected with 73 percent of the vote in the 1994 Republican wave, and six more times after that with no substantive opposition.

Everett and his wife, the former Barbara Pitts, make their home in Enterprise, Alabama, though he is listed in the House roll as "R-Rehobeth." They are Southern Baptists.

Early congressional photo of Everett

House record

Everett was one of the most conservative members of the House. He had the highest lifetime rating from the American Conservative Union of any member of the Alabama delegation. He showed a concern about local issues and demonstrated a real impact on some issues that are vital to his constituency. In 1995, he formed a Peanut Caucus and on the Agriculture Committee held out against the Freedom to Farm Act until he got the peanut program continued (though with a 10% cut in the support price). On the 2002 Farm bill, Everett chaired the Speciality Crops and Foreign Agriculture Programs Subcommittee, which placed him in a strong position to advocate the interests of peanut farmers. When the 30% peanut subsidy finally lost congressional support, he managed to secure passage of a $3.5 billion program for a fallback government purchase option for peanut farmers.

Terry Everett's political orientation based on voting record
Terry Everett visiting Vandenberg Air Force Base

Everett has also worked on military and veterans' issues (the 2nd District includes Fort Rucker). As a Veterans' Affairs Subcommittee chairman in 1999, he took credit for a $1.7 billion increase for veterans' health care spending and the opening of four new national cemeteries. Everett sought to shift funding priorities "from longer-term efforts to those that will provide more immediate benefit to the war fighter in Iraq", including space-based capabilities.

On December 14, 2005, he voted for the reauthorization of the Patriot Act. On June 29 2005 he voted for the increase of funds by $25 million for anti-marijuana print and TV ads.

In 2006, he voted against extending the Voting Rights Act due to the House's failure to adopt an amendment that would have distributed the act's provisions by current data and extended its coverage to areas beyond the southeast showing voter discrimination.

On June 16, 2006, he voted for the continued occupation of Iraq.

In an October 2006 New York Times Op-ed piece, Congressional Quarterly journalist Jeff Stein revealed that despite Everett's being vice-chairperson of the House intelligence subcommittee on technical and tactical intelligence, Everett did not know the ideological and religious differences between Sunni and Shia Muslims. Stein wrote that he posed a question to Everett: “'Do you know the difference between a Sunni and a Shiite?'... Mr. Everett responded with a low chuckle. He thought for a moment: 'One’s in one location, another’s in another location. No, to be honest with you, I don’t know. I thought it was differences in their religion, different families or something.'" After Stein explained some of those differences to the congressman, Everett responded, "“Now that you’ve explained it to me, what occurs to me is that it makes what we’re doing over there extremely difficult, not only in Iraq but that whole area.”[2]

In February 2007, Everett co-sponsored a house bill with Ron Paul to end United States membership in the United Nations.[3]

Committees and subcommittees

  • House Committee on Agriculture (4th of 25)
    • Subcommittee on Conservation, Credit, Energy and Research
    • Subcommittee on Specialty Crops, Rural Development and Foreign Agriculture Programs
  • House Committee on Armed Services (6th of 34)
    • Subcommittee on Strategic Forces (Ranking Member)
    • Subcommittee on Seapower and Expeditionary Forces
  • Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence (4th of 12)
    • Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations (Ranking Member)
    • Subcommittee on Terrorism/HUMINT, Analysis and Counter Intelligence
    • Subcommittee on Technical and Tactical Intelligence

Electoral history

2006 General Election

Candidate Votes %
Terry Everett (R) 124,212 70
Chuck James (D) 54,398 30
Terry Everett (R) re-elected for 8th term

2004 General Election

Candidate Votes %
Terry Everett (R) 177,086 71
Chuck James (D) 70,562 28
Terry Everett (R) re-elected for 7th term

2002 General Election

Candidate Votes %
Terry Everett (R) 129,233 69
Charles Woods (D) 55,495 30
Terry Everett (R) re-elected for 6th term
  • General Election 2000: Terry Everett (R) — 68%
  • General Election 1998: Terry Everett (R) — 69%
  • General Election 1996: Terry Everett (R) — 63%
  • General Election 1994: Terry Everett (R) — 74%
  • General Election 1992: Terry Everett (R) — 49%

Group ratings (2004)

References

External links

United States House of Representatives
Preceded by
William L. Dickinson
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Alabama's 2nd congressional district

January 3, 1993–January 3, 2009
Succeeded by
Bobby Bright
Advertisements

Advertisements






Got something to say? Make a comment.
Your name
Your email address
Message