The Full Wiki

More info on Texas proposition 2 (2005)

Texas proposition 2 (2005): Wikis

Advertisements
  

Note: Many of our articles have direct quotes from sources you can cite, within the Wikipedia article! This article doesn't yet, but we're working on it! See more info or our list of citable articles.

Encyclopedia

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Legal recognition of
same-sex couples
Same-sex marriage

Belgium
Canada
Netherlands
Norway

South Africa
Spain
Sweden

Performed in some jurisdictions

Mexico: DF*
United States: CT, DC*, IA, MA, NH, VT, Coquille

Recognized, not performed

Israel
United States: CA (conditional), NY

Civil unions and
registered partnerships

Andorra
Austria
Colombia
Czech Republic
Denmark
Ecuador
Finland
France
Germany
Greenland

Hungary
Iceland
Luxembourg
New Caledonia
New Zealand
Slovenia
Switzerland
Wallis and Futuna
United Kingdom
Uruguay

Performed in some jurisdictions

Argentina: BA, RC, RN, VCP
Australia: ACT, TAS, VIC
Mexico: COA
United States: CA, CO, HI, ME, NJ, NV, OR, WA, WI
Venezuela: ME

Recognized, not performed

Isle of Man (UK only)

Unregistered co-habitation

Argentina
Australia
Brazil

Croatia
Israel
Portugal

In some regions

United States: MD, RI

Status in other jurisdictions

Albania
Aruba
Bolivia
Bulgaria
Burundi
Cambodia
Chile
China (PRC)
ROC (Taiwan)
Congo (DRC)
Costa Rica
Cuba
Dominican Republic
El Salvador
Estonia
European Union
Faroe Islands
Greece
Honduras
India
Ireland
Italy
Jamaica
Japan
Jersey

Kosovo
Latvia
Liechtenstein
Lithuania
Malta
Moldova
Montenegro
Nepal
Netherlands Antilles
Nigeria
Panama
Paraguay
Philippines
Poland
Romania
Russia
Serbia
Slovakia
Singapore
South Korea
Uganda
Ukraine
Venezuela
Vietnam

United States: AL, AS, AZ, DE, FL, GU, IL, LA, ME, MI, MN, MT, NM, NC, OH, PA, PR, RI, SC, UT, WV, WY, Native Americans

Notes

*DC (subject to Congressional review) and Mexico City same-sex marriage laws are effective from 1 March and 4 March 2010, respectively.

See also

Same-sex marriage
Same-sex marriage legislation
Timeline of same-sex marriage
Civil union
Domestic partnership
Registered partnership
Civil partnership
Listings by country

LGBT portal

Texas Proposition 2 of 2005 created an amendment that limits marriage to opposite-sex relationships and prohibits alternative legal arrangements of a similar nature (see Defense of Marriage Amendment). The bill intended to amend the Texas Constitution to make it unconstitutional for the state to recognize or perform same-sex marriages, plural marriages, or civil unions. The referendum was approved by 76% of the voters, with Travis County, Texas (which contains Austin, Texas) the only county opposing the amendment, while the cities of Houston and Dallas were close.[1]

The status of the amendment authorized by Proposition 2, however, is currently in flux. It was struck down on October 1st, 2009, by Dallas District Judge Tena Callahan on the grounds that it denies same-sex couples equal treatment under the 14th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution. The lawsuit was filed by a same-sex couple living in Dallas who had married in Massachusetts in 2006 and were seeking to get a divorce in Texas, because Massachusetts only permits state residents to sue for divorce. Dallas attorney Peter Schulte also claimed the protection of Article IV of the U. S. Constitution, which gives "full faith and credit" by all states to acts validly performed in one. Texas Attorney General Greg Abbott and Governor Rick Perry are appealing the decision to higher courts, hoping to get the decision overturned. Same-sex marriages are still illegal in Texas. AP

The text of the amendment states:

(a) Marriage in this state shall consist only of the union of one man and one woman.

(b) This state or a political subdivision of this state may not create or recognize any legal status identical or similar to marriage.[2]

Shortly before the election, a minister in Austin, Texas, opposed the amendment on technical grounds. According to the minister, the wording of subsection (b) could actually be used to outlaw marriage itself. Proponents claimed that such reasoning was simply a "smokescreen" to confuse voters on the issue.[3][4] In November 2009, Barbara Ann Radnofsky, a candidate for Texas attorney general, echoed the assertion that, since marriage is by definition identical to itself, the amendment outlaws all marriage in Texas.[5]

References

  1. ^ 2005 Constitutional Amendment Election, Texas Secretary of State, Elections Division. Accessed 22 December 2006.
  2. ^ Texas Constitution, Article I, section 32. Accessed 22 December 2006.
  3. ^ Smith, Amy (2005-10-28), "Group Says Prop. 2 Could Make Straight Marriage Illegal", The Austin Chronicle, http://www.austinchronicle.com/gyrobase/Issue/story?oid=oid%3A303822, retrieved 2001-01-30  
  4. ^ "Queerly Beloved: Marriage-amendment backers claim fraud". WorldNetDaily. 2005-10-26. http://www.worldnetdaily.com/news/article.asp?ARTICLE_ID=47039. Retrieved 2001-01-30.  
  5. ^ Montgomery, Dave (2009-11-17), "Texas marriages in legal limbo due to 2005 error, Democrat says", Fort Worth Star-Telegram, http://www.star-telegram.com/804/story/1770189.html, retrieved 2009-11-20  

External links

Advertisements

Advertisements






Got something to say? Make a comment.
Your name
Your email address
Message