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The Fox and the Hound
Directed by Ted Berman
Richard Rich
Produced by Ron Miller
Art Stevens
Wolfgang Reitherman
Written by Ted Berman
Larry Clemmons
Starring Mickey Rooney
Kurt Russell
Music by Buddy Baker
Distributed by Buena Vista Distribution
Release date(s) July 10, 1981 (1981-07-10)
Running time 83 minutes
Country United States
Language English
Budget $12 million
Gross revenue $39.9 million[1]
Followed by The Fox and the Hound 2 (2006)

The Fox and the Hound is a 1981 animated film produced by Walt Disney Productions which premiered in the United States on July 10, 1981. The twenty-fourth animated feature in the Walt Disney Animated Classics series, the film is loosely based on the Daniel P. Mannix novel of the same name and centers on the story of two unlikely friends, a hound dog and a red fox, who struggle to preserve their friendship despite their emerging instincts. At the time of release, it was the most expensive animated film produced, costing $12 million.[2] It was the last "Walt Disney Animated Classics" movie to have no end credits, and the last Disney film in which Don Bluth was involved in its production. A midquel film, The Fox and the Hound 2, was released to DVD on December 12, 2006.

Contents

Plot

After a young red fox is orphaned, Big Mama (Pearl Bailey) the owl, Boomer (Paul Winchell) the woodpecker, and Dinky (Richard Bakalyan) the finch arrange for him to be adopted by the widow Tweed (Jeanette Nolan). Tweed names him Tod (voiced by Keith Coogan), since he reminds her of a toddler. Meanwhile, Tweed's neighbor, Amos Slade (Jack Albertson), brings home a young hound puppy named Copper (Corey Feldman) and introduces him to his hunting dog Chief (Pat Buttram). Tod and Copper become playmates, and vow to remain "friends forever." Slade grows frustrated at Copper for constantly wandering off to play, and places him on a leash. While playing with Copper at his home, Tod awakens Chief. Slade and Chief chase him until they are stopped by Tweed. After an argument, Slade says that he will kill Tod if he enters his farm again. Hunting season comes and Slade takes his dogs into the wilderness for the interim. Meanwhile, Big Mama explains to Tod that his friendship with Copper cannot continue, as they are natural enemies, but Tod refuses to believe her.

Months pass, and Tod and Copper reach adulthood. On the night of Copper's return, Tod (Mickey Rooney) sneaks over to meet him. Copper (Kurt Russell) explains that he is a hunting dog now and things are different between them. Chief awakens and alerts Slade, a chase ensues and Copper catches Tod. Copper lets Tod go then diverts Chief and Slade. Chief maintains his pursuit onto a railroad track where he is struck by a train and wounded. Copper and Slade blame Tod for the accident and swear vengeance. Tweed realizes that her pet is no longer safe with her and leaves him at a game preserve. Big Mama introduces him to a female fox named Vixey (Sandy Duncan), then Slade and Copper trespass into the preserve and hunt the two foxes. The chase climaxes when Slade and Copper inadvertently provoke an attack from a bear. Slade trips and is caught in his own trap and drops his gun just out of reach. Copper fights the bear but is no match for it. Tod battles the bear until they both fall down a waterfall. Copper approaches Tod as he lies in the lake below when Slade appears, ready to fire at the fox. Copper interposes his body in front of Tod, and refuses to move away. Slade lowers his gun and leaves with Copper, but not before the two former adversaries share one last smile before parting. At home, Tweed nurses Slade back to health while the dogs rest. Copper, before resting, smiles as he remembers the day when he became friends with Tod. On a hill Vixey joins Tod as he looks down on the homes of Copper and Tweed.

Production

The story was loosely based on Daniel Mannix's 1967 novel of the same name. The book had a more realistic story; it dealt with the quest of a hunter and his dog Copper to shoot Tod after he killed the hunter's new dog Chief. The novel was mainly about Tod's life in the woods. While he was raised by humans he was not childhood friends with Copper and none of the animals spoke. The story was changed to make it more suitable for a family film; instead of a story about the life and death of a fox, it became a parable about how society determines one's role despite his or her better impulses.[3]

Production of the film began in 1977.[4] The film marked a turning point in the studio: Walt Disney's "nine old men" did initial development of the animation, but by the end of production the younger set of Disney animators completed the production process.[5][6][7] Wolfgang Reitherman was producer, and championed staying true to the novel, and Larry Clemmons was head of the story team. Frank Thomas and Ollie Johnston did much of the early development of the main characters. The newer generation of animators, such as Don Bluth, Ron Clements, Glen Keane, and John Musker, would finalize the animation and complete the film's production. These animators had moved through the in-house animation training program, and would all play an important role in the Disney Renaissance of the eighties and nineties.[5]

However, the transition between the old guard and the new resulting in arguments over how to handle the film. Reitherman has his own ideas on the designs and layouts that should be used, however the newer team backed Stevens, all except one Don Bluth, who delared Disney's work stale and walked out with eleven others to form his now famous studio. The exodus of so many animators forced the cancellation of the film's original Christmas 1980 premiere while new artists were hired.[8] It cost $12 million to produce the film, making it the most expensive film of its kind to be made at that time.[9]

Distribution

The Fox and the Hound premiered in theaters on July 10, 1981.[8] It was re-released to theaters on March 25, 1988. Its first home video release, to VHS format, came on March 4, 1994. On May 2, 2000, it was released to Region 1 DVD for the first time. A 25th anniversary special edition DVD, featuring a remastered version of the film and a disc of extras, was released on October 10, 2006.

Reception

The film was considered a financial success,[1]. It was awarded a Golden Screen Award at the Goldene Leinwand Awards in 1982 and it was nominated for a Young Artist Award and the Saturn Award for Best Fantasy Film. In The Animated Movie Guide, Jerry Beck considered the film "average", though he praises the voice work of Pearl Bailey as Big Momma, and the extreme dedication to detail shown by animator Glen Keane in crafting the fight scene between Copper, Tod, and the bear.[8] In The Disney Films, Leonard Maltin also notes that the fight scene between Copper, Tod, and the bear received great praise in the animation world. Maltin felt the film relied too much on "formula cuteness, formula comedy relief, and even formula characterizations".[10] Overall, he considered the film "charming" stating that it is "warm, and brimming with personable characters" and that it "approaches the old Disney magic at times."[11]

Richard Corliss of Time Magazine, praised the film for an intelligent story about prejudice. He argued that the film shows that biased attitudes can poison even the deepest relationships, and the film's bittersweet ending delivers a powerful and important moral message to audiences.[12] Roger Ebert of the Chicago Times also praised the film, saying that "for all of its familiar qualities, this movie marks something of a departure for the Disney studio, and its movement is in an interesting direction. The Fox and the Hound is one of those relatively rare Disney animated features that contains a useful lesson for its younger audiences. It's not just cute animals and frightening adventures and a happy ending; it's also a rather thoughtful meditation on how society determines our behavior."[3]

Use in other media

A comic adaptation of the movie, drawn by Richard Moore, was published in newspapers as part of Disney's Treasury of Classic Tales.[13] A comic-book titled The Fox and the Hound followed, with new adventures of the characters.[14]

Midquel

A direct-to-video midquel, The Fox and the Hound 2, was released on December 12, 2006. The film takes place during Tod and Copper's youth, before the events of the later half of this film.

References

  1. ^ a b "The Fox and the Hound (1981)". Box Office Mojo. http://boxofficemojo.com/yearly/chart/?yr=1981&p=.htm. Retrieved 2008-09-20. 
  2. ^ The Official Disney Trivia Book: Paperjacks, date 1988, pages 63-64 , ISBN 07701-1002-9 info on cost and book source story info'
  3. ^ a b Suntimes.comRoger Ebert's review of the film
  4. ^ "The Fox and the Hound Movie History". Disney Archives. http://disney.go.com/vault/archives/movies/foxhound/foxhound.html. Retrieved April 23, 2009. 
  5. ^ a b Finch, Christopher: "Chapter 9: The End of an Era", pages 260-266. The Art of Walt Disney, 2004
  6. ^ Variety.comVariety information on Disney Animation school and new animators starting with this film
  7. ^ AWN.com Reference from Animation World Magazine, reference for this section
  8. ^ a b c Beck, Jerry (2005). The Animated Movie Guide. Chicago Review Press. pp. 86-87. ISBN 1556525915. http://books.google.com/books?id=fTI1yeZd-tkC&lpg=PT106&dq=Mannix%201967%20fox%20hound&pg=PT106#v=onepage&q=Mannix%201967%20fox%20hound&f=false. 
  9. ^ Ansen, David (July 13, 1981). "Forest Friendship". Newsweek: 81. 
  10. ^ Maltin, Leonard (2000). "Chapter 3: Without Walt". The Disney Films. p. 275. 
  11. ^ Maltin, Leonard (2010). Leonard Maltin's Movie Guide. p. 490. ISBN 0451227646. 
  12. ^ Time.comTime magazine review.
  13. ^ A. Becattini, L. Boschi, La produzione sindacata, 1984, p. 55.
  14. ^ See e.g. the Comic Book Price Guide, 1980 ed.

External links

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Quotes

Up to date as of January 14, 2010

From Wikiquote

The Fox and the Hound is a 1981 animated feature produced by Walt Disney Productions, first released to movie theatres in the United States on July 10, 1981. The twenty-fourth animated feature in the Disney animated features canon, the film is loosely based on the Daniel P. Mannix 1967 novel of the same name. A direct-to-video midquel, The Fox and the Hound 2, was released on December 12, 2006. The film is about a fox named Tod and a hound puppy named Copper, who are supposed to be enemies, but are "the best of friends". They face problems with this friendship and Copper even turns on his best friend when Chief, the older dog and garden of Copper, is nearly killed on a train, and Copper thinks it was Tod.

Two friends that didn't know they were supposed to be enemies.tagline

Dialogue

Widow Tweed: Amos Slade, you trigger-happy lunatic! Give me that gun!
[Tweed takes the gun, then shoots on Amos' radiator.]
Amos Slade: My radiator! Why, you blasted female. I'll--
Widow Tweed: [aims the gun at Amos] Hold it, right there!
Amos Slade: [nervous] Watch it! That thing's loaded.
[Tweed shoots the gun in the air.]
Widow Tweed: Now it ain't loaded!
[Tweed tosses the now-useless gun back at Amos.]
Amos Slade: Dagnabbit, woman, your thievin' fox was after my chickens!
Widow Tweed: Rubbish and poppycock! I don't believe it. He wouldn't hurt a thing.
Amos Slade: You callin' me a liar, you muddle-headed female?! I saw it happen!
Widow Tweed: Amos Slade, that temper of yours is going to get you into a lot of trouble someday.
Amos Slade: [turns red in the face] Temper? Temper?! Woman, you ain't seen my temper! If I ever catch that fox on my property again, I'll blast him! And next time I won't miss!

[While chasing Squeeks, Boomer accidentally pecks off the branch he's standing on and has a nasty fall]
Young Tod: What happened to you? Golly!
Boomer: Aw, shucks! I think I bent my b-b-b-b-beak.
Dinky: [to Boomer] Now see what you've done! You lost us our breakfast!
Boomer: I lost us our breakfast? It was your fault!
[An argument begins]

[Dinky and Boomer watch Squeeks through Tweed's keyhole]
Dinky: Look at that little creep. Warm and cosy by the fire.
Boomer: Let me take a look. How do you like that guy? S-s-s-snug as a b-b-bug! While we're out here f-f-freezin' our b-b-b-b-beaks off!
Dinky: Yeah. Well, yakkin' and shiverin' ain't getting us anywhere. We'll get that no-good worm when we come back! [flies away]
Boomer: [follows Dinky] Oh, sh-sh-sh-sh-shucks!

Young Tod: I'm a fox. My name's Tod. What's your name, kid?
Young Copper: My name's Copper. I'm a hound dog!

[Tod goes into Chief's barrel to watch him sleeping]
Young Copper: Oh, don't go in there! He can get awful mean!
Young Tod: [smirks] His ears ain't as big as yours, Copper.
Young Copper: That's not the part you have to worry about...
Young Tod: Woah. Look at those teeth...
Young Copper: That's the part you gotta worry about!

Young Tod: Copper, you're my very best friend.
Young Copper: And you're mine too, Tod.
Young Tod: And we'll always be friends forever. Won't we?
Young Copper: Yeah, forever.
[Note: This dialogue is repeated as a voice-over at the end of the film]

[After breaking his leg, Chief whines and leaves his designated room, trying to get sympathy.]
Amos Slade: Chief, get back in there before I break your other leg.

[Tod tries to catch a fish.]
Vixey: Tod, do you need help?
Tod: No, I knew this way, all the...all the time! [falls into the water, then ends up catching a stick] I got him!
Boomer: [laughs] Oh, that farm boy! He knew nothing about fishin'!
[All laugh hysterically]

(Big Mama explains to Tod that Copper will come back a fully trained hunting dog.)
Tod: Oh, no. Not my friend Copper. He won't never change.
Big Mama: I hope you're right, Tod.
Tod: And we'll keep on being friends forever. Uh, won't we, Big Mama?
Big Mama: Darlin', forever is a long, long time. And time has a way of changin' things.

Adult Copper: [upon seeing Tod] I thought that was you, Tod. I heard you coming. Boy, you've really grown.
Adult Tod: You have too, Copper. I saw you coming back with Chief and the hunter.
Adult Copper: It's great to see you, Tod. [looks back at Chief, who is trying to sleep] But you know, you-- You shouldn't be over here. You're going get us both into a lot of trouble.
Adult Tod: Look, I-- I just wanted to see you. We're still friends, aren't we?
Adult Copper: [makes a sad glare] Tod... those days are over. I'm a hunting dog now. [Tod becomes surprised, then feels sad] You-- You better get out of here before old Chief wakes up.
Adult Tod: Oh, Chief. [chuckles] He doesn't worry me.
Adult Copper: [whispers, as Chief is barely awakening] Tod, I'm serious. Your-- your fair game as far as he's concerned!
Widow Tweed: Goodbye May Seem Forever, Farewell is like the end, but in my heart's a memory, and there you'll always be.
[Copper yawns and lays down to go to sleep. He closes his eyes and smiles as he thinks about when he and Tod were younger.]'
[repeated dialogue]
Young Tod: Copper, you're my very best friend.
Young Copper: And you're mine too, Tod.
Young Tod: And we'll always be friends forever, won't we?
Young Copper: Yeah. Forever.
[The film ends with Tod and Vixey sitting on a hill, overlooking where Copper is.]

External links

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Wikipedia has an article about:

Simple English

The Fox and the Hound
Directed by Art Stevens
Co-Director:
Ted Berman
Richard Rich
Produced by Ron Miller
Art Stevens
Wolfgang Reitherman
Written by Novel:
Daniel P. Mannix
Screenplay
Ted Berman
Larry Clemmons
Story:David Michener
Peter Young
Burny Mattinson
Starring Mickey Rooney
Kurt Russell
Music by Score:
Buddy Baker
Songs
Richard Johnson
Richard Rich
Jim Stafford
Jeffrey Patch
Editing by James Koford
James Melton
Distributed by Buena Vista Distribution
Release date(s) July 10, 1981
Running time 83 minutes
Country United States
Language English
Budget $12 million [1]
Gross revenue $39.9 million[2]

The Fox and the Hound is a 1981 animated movie produced by Walt Disney Productions, first released to movie theaters in the United States on July 10, 1981. The 24th movie in the list of Disney animated movies, the movie is about two unlikely friends, a red fox and a hound dog, who have trouble preserving their friendship because of their emerging instincts.

In the movie, the two main characters, Tod and Copper, become such good friends and play together. However, as they grow up, they become enemies because real hounds hunt foxes for food.

Copper's owner, Amos Slade, Copper's owner, Amos Slade, wants to kill Tod and he'll do anything to get him. He even has his other dog Chief to help him. As Tod and Copper get older they start to become more of enemies. They face problems with this friendship and Copper even turns on his best friend when Chief, the older dog and guardian of Copper, is nearly killed on a train, and Copper thinks it was Tod.

The story was loosely based on Daniel P Mannix's 1967 book with the same name. The book had a more realistic story, it dealt with the quest of a hunter and his dog Copper to shoot Tod after he killed the hunter's new dog Chief. The novel was mainly about Tod's life in the woods. While he was raised by humans he was not childhood friends with Copper and none of the animals spoke. The story was changed to make it more suitable for a family movie; instead of a story about the life and death of a fox, it became a parable about how society determines our roles despite our better impulses.[3]

The Fox and the Hound was the last movie which was worked on with animation legends like Frank Thomas, and Oillie Johnston, two members of Walt Disney's original "nine old men" whom also worked on this movie, with it being the last movie for both, as well as the first movie for future Disney leaders like Tim Burton (The Nightmare Before Christmas), Brad Bird (The Incredibles, Ratatouille, and Glen Keane, who animated the bear in this movie, and later worked on other animated films like The Little Mermaid (1989) and Beauty and the Beast (1991), in which he designed the beast. It was also the final Disney movie to have all the credits in the title sequence instead of having end credits and have the words, "The End. A Walt Disney Production" at the end of the movie, the last Disney animated movie to use the Buena Vista logo, and the last Disney movie in which Don Bluth was involved in its production.

The movie stars the voices of Kurt Russell, Mickey Rooney, Pearl Bailey, Pat Buttram, Sandy Duncan, Richard Bakalyan, Paul Winchell, Jack Albertson, Jeanette Nolan, John Fiedler, John McIntire, Keith Mitchell, and Corey Feldman. A direct-to-video midquel, The Fox and the Hound 2, was released to DVD on December 12, 2006.

Contents

The story

The movie begins when a baby fox is orphaned after his mama is killed by hunters. An owl named Big Mama and her two bird friends, a sparrow named Diny and a woodpecker named Boomer, arrange for him to be adopted by a widow named Widow Tweed. She names him Tod, since he reminds her of a toddler.

Meanwhile, Tweed's neighbor, a hunter named Amos Slade, brings home a young hound puppy named Copper and introduces him to his hunting dog Chief. Tod and Copper become playmates, and vow to remain "friends forever."

Amos Slade gets angry at Copper for always running off to play, and puts a leash on him. While playing with Copper at his home, Tod awakens Chief. Slade and Chief chase him until they are stopped by Tweed.

After an argument, Slade says that he wants to kill Tod and he'll do anything to get him. When hunting season comes he takes the dogs and goes on a hunting trip. Meanwhile, Big Mama tells Tod that his friendship with Copper cannot continue, as they are natural enemies, but Tod does not want to believe her.

Months pass, and Tod and Copper are now adults. On the night when Copper returns, Tod comes and asks if they are still friends. Copper says that "those days are over." and that "I'm a hunting dog now."

Copper warns Tod that Chief will wake up but Tod says that Chief does not worry him. Chief wakes up anyway and alerts Slade. They chase Tod and Copper finds him. Copper lets Tod go and leads Chief and Slade to go a different way then to Tod, and Tod tries to escape on a railroad track. But Chief finds him and chases Tod, and the train comes and hits Chief. Copper and Slade blame Tod for the accident and swear vengeance.

Tweed knows that Tod is no longer safe with her and leaves him in a game preserve. Big Mama introduces him to a lady fox named Vixey, where things seem perfect, but Slade and Copper tresspass into the preserve and hunt the two foxes. When Slade is ready to shot them, a huge bear suddenly attacks him. He trips and gets caught in his own trap droping his gun out of reach. Copper fights the bear but is no match for it. Tod battles the bear until they both fall down a waterfall.

Copper approaches Tod as he lies in the lake below when Slade appears, ready to fire at the fox. Copper interposes his body in front of Tod, and refuses to move away. Slade finnally lowers his gun and leaves with Copper, but not before the two former adversaries share one last smile before parting. At home, Tweed nurses Slade back to health while the dogs rest. Copper, before resting, smiles as he remembers the day when he became friends with Tod. On a hill Vixey joins Tod as he looks down on the homes of Copper and Tweed.

Cast

  • Mickey Rooney as Tod
  • Kurt Russell as Copper
  • Pearl Bailey as Big Mama
  • Jack Albertson as Amos Slade
  • Sandy Duncan as Vixey
  • Jeanette Nola as Widow Tweed
  • Pat Buttram as Chief
  • John McIntire as The Badger
  • John Fiedler as The Porcupine
  • Richard Bakalyan as Dinky
  • Paul Winchell as Boomer
  • Keith Coogan as Young Tod
  • Corey Feldman as Young Copper

Release

The Fox and the Hound was first released to theaters on July 10, 1981. It was re-released to theaters on March 25, 1988. Its first home video release, on VHS format, came on March 4, 1994 as the last video of the "Walt Disney Classics" collection (it was not included in the "Masterpiece Collection"). On May 2, 2000, it was released to Region 1 DVD for the first time under the "Walt Disney Gold Classic Collection". A 25th anniversary special edition DVD, featuring a remastered version of the movie and a disc of extras, was released on October 10, 2006.

Midquel

A direct-to-video midquel, The Fox and the Hound 2, was released on December 12, 2006. The movie takes place during Tod and Copper's children, in which Copper is tempted to join a band of singing stray dogs, before the second half of this movie.

Soundtrack listing

  • "Best of Friends" Music by Richard Johnston, Lyrics by Stan Fidel, Performed by Pearl Bailey
  • "Lack of Education" Music and Lyrics by Jim Stafford, Performed by Pearl Bailey
  • "A Huntin' Man" Music and Lyrics by Jim Stafford, Performed by Jack Albertson
  • "Appreciate the Lady" Music and Lyrics by Jim Stafford, Performed by Pearl Bailey
  • "Goodbye May Seem Forever" Music by Richard Rich, Lyrics by Jeffrey Patch, Performed by Jeanette Nolan

Titles in other languages

Supervising animators

References

  1. Ansen, David (July 13, 1981). [Expression error: Unexpected < operator "Forest Friendship"]. Newsweek: 81. 
  2. "The Fox and the Hound (1981)". Box Office Mojo. http://boxofficemojo.com/yearly/chart/?yr=1981&p=.htm. Retrieved 2008-09-20. 
  3. Roger Ebert's review of the movie

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