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The Green Mile

Promotional poster
Directed by Frank Darabont
Produced by Frank Darabont
David Valdes
Written by Novel:
Stephen King
Screenplay:
Frank Darabont
Starring Tom Hanks
David Morse
Bonnie Hunt
Michael Clarke Duncan
James Cromwell
Michael Jeter
Graham Greene
Doug Hutchison
Sam Rockwell
Barry Pepper
Jeffrey DeMunn
Patricia Clarkson
Harry Dean Stanton
Dabbs Greer
Music by Thomas Newman
Cinematography David Tattersall
Editing by Richard Francis-Bruce
Studio Castle Rock Entertainment
Distributed by Warner Bros.
Release date(s) December 10, 1999
Running time 188 minutes
Language English
Budget $60 million
Gross revenue $286,801,388

The Green Mile is a 1999 American drama film directed by Frank Darabont and adapted by him from the 1996 Stephen King novel of the same name. The movie is told in a flashback format and stars Tom Hanks as Paul Edgecomb and Michael Clarke Duncan as John Coffey and tells the story of Paul and his life as a corrections officer on Death Row during the Great Depression and the supernatural events he witnessed.

The film was nominated for four Academy Awards: Best Supporting Actor, Best Picture, Best Sound, and Best Adapted Screenplay.

Contents

Plot

In a Louisiana nursing home, Paul Edgecomb (Dabbs Greer) begins to cry while watching the movie Top Hat. His elderly friend, Elaine, takes concern for him and Paul tells her that the film reminded him of when he was a corrections officer in charge of Death Row inmates in state's Cold Mountain Penitentiary during the summer of 1935. The domain Paul (Tom Hanks) works in is called the "Green Mile" because the condemned prisoners walking to their execution are said to be walking "the last mile"; here, it is a stretch of green linoleum to the electric chair.

One day, John Coffey (Michael Clarke Duncan), a giant black man convicted of raping and killing two young white girls arrives on death row. Coffey demonstrates all the characteristics of being 'developmentally challenged': keeping to himself, fearing darkness, and being moved to tears on occasion. Soon enough, John reveals extraordinary powers by healing Paul's urinary tract infection and resurrecting a mouse. Later, he would heal the terminally-ill wife of Warden Hal Moores (James Cromwell), who suffered from a large brain tumor. When John is asked to explain his power, he merely says that he "took it back."

At the same time, Percy Wetmore (Doug Hutchison), a sadistic and unpopular guard, starts work. He "knows people, big people" (he is the nephew of the governor's wife), in effect preventing Paul or anybody else from doing anything significant to curb his behavior. Percy recognizes that the other officers greatly dislike him and uses that to demand managing the next execution. After that, he promises, he will have himself transferred to an administrative post at Briar Ridge Mental Hospital and Paul will never hear from him again. An agreement is made, but Percy then deliberately sabotages the execution. Instead of wetting the sponge used to conduct electricity, he leaves it dry, causing excruciating pain to Eduard "Del" Delacroix (Michael Jeter).

Shortly before Del's execution, a violent prisoner named William "Wild Bill" Wharton (Sam Rockwell) arrives, due to be executed for multiple murders committed during a robbery. At one point he seizes John's arm and John psychically senses that Wharton is the true killer of the two girls, the crime for which John was convicted and sentenced to death. John "takes back" the sickness in Hal's wife and regurgitates it into Percy, who then shoots Wharton to death and falls into a permanent catatonic state. Percy is then housed in the Briar Ridge Mental Hospital. In the wake of these events, Paul interrogates John, who says he "punished them bad men" and offers to show Paul what he saw. John takes Paul's hand stating that he has to give Paul "a part of himself" in order to see and imparts the visions of what he saw, of what really happened to the girls.

Paul asks John what he should do, if he should open the door and let John walk away. John tells him no, he is ready to go because here there is too much pain in the world, which he can feel, and that he is "rightly tired of the pain" and is ready to rest. When John is put in the electric chair, he asks Paul not to put the traditional black hood over his head because he is afraid of the dark. Paul agrees and after Paul shakes his hand, John is executed.

As Paul finishes his story, he notes that he requested a transfer to a youth detention center, where he spent the remainder of his career. Elaine questions his statement that he had a fully-grown son at the time and Paul explains that he was 44 years old at the time of John's execution and that he is now 108 and still in excellent health. This is apparently a side effect of John giving a "part of himself" to Paul. Mr. Jingles, Del's mouse resurrected by John, is also still alive — but Paul believes his outliving all of his relatives and friends to be a punishment from God for having John executed. Paul explains he has deep thoughts about how "we each owe a death; there are no exceptions; but, Oh God, sometimes the Green Mile seems so long."

Soundtrack

The official film soundtrack, Music from the Motion Picture The Green Mile, was released on December 14, 1999 by Warner Bros.. It contains 35 tracks, primarily instrumental tracks from the film score by Thomas Newman. It also contains four vocal tracks: "Cheek to Cheek" by Fred Astaire, "I Can't Give You Anything but Love, Baby" by Billie Holiday, "Did You Ever See a Dream Walking?" by Gene Austin, and "Charmaine" by Guy Lombardo and His Royal Canadians.

Reception

The film received positive reviews from critics with a 77% 'Certified Fresh' approval rating on Rotten Tomatoes.[1]

Forbes commentator Dawn Mendez referred to the character of John Coffey as a "'magic Negro' figure"—a term coined by Spike Lee to describe a stereotypical fictional black person depicted in a fictional work as a "saintly, nonthreatening" person whose purpose in life is to solve a problem for or otherwise further the happiness of a white person.[2] Lee himself berated the character as one of several "super-duper, magical Negro[es]" depicting a skewed version of the black male, claiming it was due to the prominence of white decision makers in the media companies. At the same time Spike Lee berated the same white media for rarely showing black males in positive roles, preferring to depict black males as "threatening, violent and antisocial".[3]

Awards and nominations

1999 Academy Awards[4]

2000 Academy of Science Fiction, Fantasy & Horror Films

2000 Broadcast Music Incorporated Film & TV Awards

2000 Black Reel Awards

2000 Blockbuster Entertainment Awards

2000 Bram Stoker Awards

2000 Broadcast Film Critics Association Awards

2000 Chicago Film Critics Association Awards

2000 Directors Guild of America

  • Nominated - Outstanding Directorial Achievement in Motion Pictures — Frank Darabont

2000 Golden Globe Awards

2000 NAACP Image Awards

2000 MTV Movie Awards

2000 Motion Picture Sound Editors (Golden Reel Awards)

  • Nominated - Best Sound Editing - Dialogue and ADR — Mark A. Mangini, Julia Evershade
  • Nominated - Best Sound Editing - Effects and Foley — Mark A. Mangini, Aaron Glascock, Howell Gibbens, David E. Stone, Solange S. Schwalbe

2000 People's Choice Awards

  • Won - Favorite All-Around Motion Picture
  • Won - Favorite Dramatic Motion Picture

2001 Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America (Nebula Award)

2000 Screen Actors Guild Awards

  • Nominated - Outstanding Performance by a Cast
  • Nominated - Outstanding Performance by a Male Actor in a Supporting Role — Michael Clarke Duncan

References

  1. ^ The Green Mile at Rotten Tomatoes
  2. ^ Mendez, Dawn (January 23, 2009). "The 'Magic Negro'". Forbes. http://www.forbes.com/2009/01/23/obama-magic-negro-oped-cx_dm_0123mendez.html. Retrieved October 26, 2009. 
  3. ^ "Lee Takes Issue With Depiction of Minorities in Film". San Jose Mercury News: p. 2E. February 7, 2001. 
  4. ^ "The 72nd Academy Awards." The New York Times - Breaking News, World News & Multimedia. <http://www.nytimes.com/library/film/oscars2000.html>.

External links


The Green Mile
Directed by Frank Darabont
Produced by Frank Darabont
David Valdes
Written by Novel:
Stephen King
Screenplay:
Frank Darabont
Starring Tom Hanks
David Morse
Bonnie Hunt
Michael Clarke Duncan
James Cromwell
Music by Thomas Newman
Cinematography David Tattersall
Editing by Richard Francis-Bruce
Studio Castle Rock Entertainment
Distributed by Warner Bros.
Release date(s) December 10, 1999
Running time 188 minutes
Country United States
Language English
Budget $60 million
Gross revenue $286,801,388

The Green Mile is a 1999 American drama film directed by Frank Darabont and adapted by him from the 1996 Stephen King novel of the same name. The movie is told in a flashback format and stars Tom Hanks as Paul Edgecomb and Michael Clarke Duncan as John Coffey and tells the story of Paul and his life as a corrections officer on Death Row during the Great Depression and the supernatural events he witnessed.

The film was nominated for four Academy Awards: Best Supporting Actor, Best Picture, Best Sound, and Best Adapted Screenplay.

Contents

Plot

In a Louisiana nursing home in 1999, Paul Edgecomb (Dabbs Greer) begins to cry while watching the movie Top Hat. His elderly friend, Elaine, shows concern for him and Paul tells her that the film reminded him of when he was a corrections officer in charge of Death Row inmates at Cold Mountain Penitentiary during the summer of 1935. The cell block Paul (Tom Hanks) works in is called the "Green Mile" by the guards because the condemned prisoners walking to their execution are said to be walking "the last mile"; here, it is a stretch of faded lime green linoleum to the electric chair.

One day, John Coffey (Michael Clarke Duncan), a 7 foot 7 inch, 515 pound African-American man convicted of raping and killing two young white girls arrives on death row. Coffey demonstrates all the characteristics of being 'developmentally challenged': keeping to himself, fearing darkness, and being moved to tears on occasion. Soon enough, John reveals extraordinary powers by healing Paul's urinary tract infection and resurrecting a mouse. Later, he would heal the terminally-ill wife of Warden Hal Moores (James Cromwell), who suffered from a large brain tumor. When John is asked to explain his power, he merely says that he "took it back."

At the same time, Percy Wetmore (Doug Hutchison), a sadistic and unpopular guard, starts work. He "knows people, big people" (he is the nephew of the governor's wife), in effect preventing Paul or anybody else from doing anything significant to curb his behavior. Percy recognizes that the other officers greatly dislike him and uses that to demand managing the next execution. After that, he promises, he will have himself transferred to an administrative post at Briar Ridge Mental Hospital and Paul will never hear from him again. An agreement is made, but Percy then deliberately sabotages the execution. Instead of wetting the sponge, used to conduct electricity and make executions quick and effective, he leaves it dry, causing inmate Eduard "Del" Delacroix's (Michael Jeter) execution to be botched.

Shortly before Del's execution, a violent prisoner named William "Wild Bill" Wharton (Sam Rockwell) arrives, due to be executed for multiple murders committed during a robbery. At one point he seizes John's arm and John psychically senses that Wharton is the true killer of the two girls, the crime for which John was convicted and sentenced to death. John "takes back" the sickness in Hal's wife and regurgitates it into Percy, who then shoots Wharton to death and falls into a permanent catatonic state. Percy is then housed in the Briar Ridge Mental Hospital. In the wake of these events, Paul interrogates John, who says he "punished them bad men" and offers to show Paul what he saw. John takes Paul's hand stating that he has to give Paul "a part of himself" in order to see and imparts the visions of what he saw, of what really happened to the girls.

Paul asks John what he should do, if he should open the door and let John walk away, but John tells him that he is ready to die because here there is too much pain in the world, which he is aware of and sensitive to, stating that he is "rightly tired of the pain" and is ready to rest. When John is put in the electric chair, he asks Paul not to put the traditional black hood over his head because he is afraid of the dark. Paul agrees and after Paul shakes his hand, John is executed.

As Paul finishes his story, he notes that he requested a transfer to a youth detention center, where he spent the remainder of his career. Elaine questions his statement that he had a fully-grown son at the time and Paul explains that he was 44 years old at the time of John's execution and that he is now 108 and still in excellent health. This is apparently a side effect of John giving a "part of himself" to Paul. Mr. Jingles, Del's mouse resurrected by John, is also still alive — but Paul believes his outliving all of his relatives and friends to be a punishment from God for having John executed. Paul explains he has deep thoughts about how "we each owe a death; there are no exceptions; but, Oh God, sometimes the Green Mile seems so long." Paul is left wondering, if Mr. Jingles has remained alive for all of this time being but a mouse, how long will it be before his own death?

Cast

Soundtrack

The official film soundtrack, Music from the Motion Picture The Green Mile, was released on December 19, 1999 by Warner Bros.. It contains 35 tracks, primarily instrumental tracks from the film score by Thomas Newman. It also contains four vocal tracks: "Cheek to Cheek" by Fred Astaire, "I Can't Give You Anything but Love, Baby" by Billie Holiday, "Did You Ever See a Dream Walking?" by Gene Austin, and "Charmaine" by Guy Lombardo and His Royal Canadians.

Reception

The film received positive reviews from critics with a 78% "Certified Fresh" approval rating on Rotten Tomatoes.[1] Roger Ebert gave the film 3 and a half stars out of four, writing "The film is a shade over three hours long. I appreciated the extra time, which allows us to feel the passage of prison months and years."[2]

Forbes commentator Dawn Mendez referred to the character of John Coffey as a "'magic Negro' figure"—a term coined by Spike Lee to describe a stereotypical fictional black person depicted in a fictional work as a "saintly, nonthreatening" person whose purpose in life is to solve a problem for or otherwise further the happiness of a white person.[3] Lee himself berated the character as one of several "super-duper, magical Negro[es]" depicting a skewed version of the black male, claiming it was due to the prominence of white decision makers in the media companies.[4]

Awards and nominations

1999 Academy Awards[5]

2000 Academy of Science Fiction, Fantasy & Horror Films

2000 Broadcast Music Incorporated Film & TV Awards

2000 Black Reel Awards

2000 Blockbuster Entertainment Awards

2000 Bram Stoker Awards

2000 Broadcast Film Critics Association Awards

2000 Chicago Film Critics Association Awards

2000 Directors Guild of America

  • Nominated - Outstanding Directorial Achievement in Motion Pictures — Frank Darabont

2000 Golden Globe Awards

2000 NAACP Image Awards

2000 MTV Movie Awards

2000 Motion Picture Sound Editors (Golden Reel Awards)

  • Nominated - Best Sound Editing - Dialogue and ADR — Mark A. Mangini, Julia Evershade
  • Nominated - Best Sound Editing - Effects and Foley — Mark A. Mangini, Aaron Glascock, Howell Gibbens, David E. Stone, Solange S. Schwalbe

2000 People's Choice Awards

  • Won - Favorite All-Around Motion Picture
  • Won - Favorite Dramatic Motion Picture

2001 Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America (Nebula Award)

2000 Screen Actors Guild Awards

  • Nominated - Outstanding Performance by a Cast
  • Nominated - Outstanding Performance by a Male Actor in a Supporting Role — Michael Clarke Duncan

References

  1. ^ The Green Mile at Rotten Tomatoes
  2. ^ "The Green Mile". Chicago Sun-Times. http://rogerebert.suntimes.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/19991210/REVIEWS/912100302/1023. 
  3. ^ Mendez, Dawn (January 23, 2009). "The 'Magic Negro'". Forbes. http://www.forbes.com/2009/01/23/obama-magic-negro-oped-cx_dm_0123mendez.html. Retrieved October 26, 2009. 
  4. ^ "Lee Takes Issue With Depiction of Minorities in Film". San Jose Mercury News: p. 2E. February 7, 2001. 
  5. ^ "The 72nd Academy Awards." The New York Times - Breaking News, World News & Multimedia. < http://www.nytimes.com/library/film/oscars2000.html>.

External links


Quotes

Up to date as of January 14, 2010
(Redirected to The Green Mile article)

From Wikiquote

The Green Mile (1999), written by Stephen King (novel) and Frank Darabont (screenplay), directed by Frank Darabont

Contents

Paul Edgecomb

  • I guess sometimes the past just catches up with you, whether you want it to or not. Usually death row was called "the Last Mile". We called ours "the Green Mile" - the floor was the color of faded limes. We had the electric chair, "Old Sparky" we called it. Oh, I've lived a lot of years, Ellie, but 1935 - that takes the prize. That year I had the worst urinary infection of my life, and… that was… that was also the year of… John Coffey and… the two dead girls.
  • [Repeated line] What happens on the Mile stays on the Mile. Always has.
  • I've done some things in my life I'm not proud of, but this is the first time I've ever felt in real danger of hell.
  • A big man is ripping your ears off, Percy! I'd do as he says!
  • [Edgecomb talks to Warden Moores about sadistic guard Percy.] The man is mean and careless and stupid, and that's a bad combination in a place like this. Sooner or later, he's gonna get somebody hurt, or worse.
  • And you, Elaine. You'll die, too. And my curse… is knowing that I'll be there to see it. It's my torment, you see. It's my punishment for lettin' John Coffey ride the lightnin'. For killin' a miracle of God. … You'll be gone like all the others, and I'll have to stay. Oh, I'll die eventually — of that I'm sure. I have no illusions of immortality. But I will have wished for death… long before death finds me. In truth, I wish for it already.
  • We each owe a death — there are no exceptions, I know that — but, sometimes, oh God, the Green Mile seems so long.
  • Time takes it all, whether you want it to or not. Time takes it all, bears it away, and in the end there is only darkness. Sometimes we find others in that darkness, and sometimes we lose them there again.
  • And I think about all of us. Walking our own green mile; each in our own time.

John Coffey

  • [Coffey thinks of Top Hat as he's being strapped to the electric chair.]

[singing/sobbing] Heaven… I'm in heaven… heaven…

  • [Coffey is entranced watching Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers dancing "Cheek to Cheek" in Top Hat.]

Why, they's angels. Angels just like up in heaven.

  • [Repeated throughout the film]

John Coffey, just like the drink, but not spelled the same.

  • [Coffey explains to Edgecomb his decision to end his life]

I'm tired, boss. Tired of bein' on the road, lonely as a sparrow in the rain. I'm tired of never having me a buddy to be with, to tell me where we's going to, or coming from, or why. Mostly I'm tired of people being ugly to each other. I'm tired of all the pain I feel and hear in the world every day. There's too much of it. It's like pieces of glass in my head all the time. Can you understand?

  • [Repeated throughout the film]

You be still now. You be so quiet and so still.

  • [Coffey's words immediately before his execution]

He killed them with their love. That's how it is every day, all over the world.

William "Wild Bill" Wharton

  • [singing] Bar-be-QUE! Me and you! Stinky-pinky, fue-fue-fue! Weren't Billy, Jilly, Hilly, or Pa! It was a French-fried Cajun named Delacroix! WOO!
  • [after being put in the restraint room] All I wanted me was a little corn bread, you motherfuckers! All I wanted me was a little corn bread!
  • [preparing for an altercation with the prison guards; laughing] You can come in here on your legs, but you'll go out on your backs. Billy the Kid gonna guarantee ya that.

Percy Wetmore

  • [bringing in a new prisoner] Dead man walking, we got a dead man walking here.
  • [patting Arlen "Chief" Bitterbuck's dead cheek] Adios, Chief. Drop us a card from Hell. Let us know if it's hot enough.

Dialogue

  • [The day after Coffey cures Edgecombe's urinary infection, Edgecombe brings Coffey some cornbread.]
Paul Edgecombe: It's from my missus. She wanted to… thank you.
John Coffey: Thank me for what?
Paul Edgecombe: Well, you know. [looks around, then whispers] For helping me.
John Coffey: Helpin' you with what?
Paul Edgecombe: You know.
[Edgecomb looks down and points to his groin.]
John Coffey: Ohhhhh. Was your missus pleased?
Paul Edgecombe: Several times.

  • [After Coffey brings Mr. Jingles back to life…]
Dean Stanton: What did you do?
John Coffey: I helped Del's mouse. He a circus mouse. Gonna live in a mouse city, down in… [struggles with a word]
Brutus "Brutal" Howell: Florida?
[Coffey nods.]
John Coffey: Boss Percy bad. He mean. He step on Del's mouse. I took it back, t'ough.

  • [Percy sees Mr. Jingles alive again. He storms back to Edgecombe and Howell.]
Percy Wetmore: You switched 'em. You switched 'em somehow, you bastards.
Brutus "Brutal" Howell: [grinning] I always keep a spare mouse in my wallet for occasions such as this.

  • [Warden Moores storms into the room after Delacroix's excrutiatingly long electrocution.]
Hal Moores: What in the blue fuck was that?!? Jesus Christ! There's puke all over the floor up there… And the smell! I got Van Hay to open both doors, but that smell won't go out for five damn years, that's what I'm bettin'. And that asshole, Wharton, is singing about it! You can hear him up there!
Paul Edgecombe: [calmly] Can he carry a tune, Hal?
[Moores takes the hint and laughs grimly, regaining his composure.]
Hal Moores: Okay, boys, okay. Now, what in the hell happened?
Paul Edgecombe: An execution. A successful one.
Hal Moores: How in the name of Christ can you call that a success?
Paul Edgecombe: Eduard Delacroix is dead.
[Edgecomb looks at Percy.]
Paul Edgecombe: Isn't he.
Hal Moores: Percy? Something to say?
Percy Wetmore: [meekly] I didn't know the sponge was supposed to be wet.
Hal Moores: How many years you spend pissing on a toilet seat before someone told you to put it up?
Paul Edgecombe: [calmly] Percy fucked up, Hal. Pure and simple.
Hal Moores: That your official position?
Paul Edgecombe: Don't you think it should be? He's puttin' in a transfer request to Briar Ridge tomorrow. Movin' on to bigger and better things. Isn't that right, Percy?
Percy Wetmore: Yeah. Yeah.
Wild Bill: [singing off-camera] Bar-be-QUE!

  • [Paul has the "boys" over for lunch, as he hatches his plan for the Warden's terminally-ill wife.]
Paul Edgecombe: You all saw what he did to the mouse.
Brutal Howell: I coulda gone the rest o' the day without you bringin' that up.
Dean Stanton: I coulda gone the rest o' the year.
Paul Edgecombe: He did the same thing to me. He put his hands on me… he took my bladder infection away.
Jan Edgecombe: 'S true. When he came home that day, he was…
[She pauses and half-smiles.]
Jan Edgecombe: … all better.
[Paul gives her a sly look.]
Dean Stanton: Aw, wait. You're talkin' about a… authentic healin', a… "praise-Jesus" miracle?
Paul Edgecombe: I am.
Jan Edgecombe: [barely suppressing a grin] Ohh, yeah.

  • [Terwilliger out the foolishness of taking convicted murderer Coffey out of prison.]
Harry Terwilliger: Now, w-what if he escapes? I'd hate to lose my job or go to… prison… but I'd hate worse to have a dead child on my conscience.
Paul Edgecombe: I don't think that's gonna happen. In fact… I don't think he did it at all. I do not see… God putting a… a gift like that in the hands of a man who could kill a child.

  • Paul Edgecombe: Men under strain can snap. Hurt themselves and hurt others. That's why our job is talking, not yelling. You'd do better to think of this place like as an intensive care ward of a hospital.
Percy Wetmore: I think of it as a bucket of piss to drown rats in. That's all. Anybody doesn't like it… you can kiss my ass.

  • [Percy, staring vacantly, is unresponsive after his final debacle with Wild Bill.]
Bill Dodge: Son, can ya hear me?
Sheriff McGee: Speak up if you can hear us.
Bill Dodge: I think this boy's cheese slid off his cracker

  • [Coffey seizes a suffering Edgecombe for a few moments, then spews a mysterious insect-like cloud, which dissipates.]
Paul Edgecombe: What did you just do to me?
John Coffey: I helped it. Didn't I help it? I just took it back, is all. Awful tired now, boss. Dog tired.

  • Paul Edgecombe: John… tell me what you want me to do. You want me to take you out o' here? Just let you run away? See how far you could get?
John Coffey: Why would you do such a foolish thing?
Paul Edgecombe: On the day of my judgment, when I stand before God, and He asks me why did I… did I kill one of his true… miracles… what am I gonna say? That it was my job? [muttering] It was my job.
John Coffey: You tell God the Father it was a kindness you done.
[Coffey puts his hand on Edgecombe's wrung ones.]
John Coffey: I know you hurtin' and worryin'. I can feel it on you. But you oughta quit on it now. I want it over and done with. I do. I'm tired, boss. Tired of bein' on the road, lonely as a sparrow in the rain. I'm tired of never having me a buddy to be with, to tell me where we's going to, or coming from, or why. Mostly I'm tired of people being ugly to each other. I'm tired of all the pain I feel and hear in the world every day. There's too much of it. It's like pieces of glass in my head all the time. Can you understand?
Paul Edgecombe: Yes, John, I think I can.

  • [Feeding a slow but still active Mr. Jingles, Paul tells Elaine about the consequences of John's gift.]
Elaine Connelly: He infected you with life?
Old Paul Edgecombe: That's as good a word as any.

  • [After subduing Wild Bill with a firehose]
Brutus "Brutal" Howell: Come on, Wild Bill. Little walky-walky.
Wild Bill: Don't you call me that! Wild Bill Hickok wasn't no range rider! He was just some bushwackin' John Law! Dumb sunovabitch sat with his back to the door, killed by a drunk.
Brutus "Brutal" Howell: (sarcastically) Oh my suds and body, a history lesson.

Old Man: (disgusted) Why do we always watch this stuff?
Old Woman: It's interesting.
Old Man: "Interesting"? Bunch of inbred trailer trash? All they ever talk about is fucking.
[The group of old women look shocked]

Major cast

See also

External links

Wikipedia
Wikipedia has an article about:

Simple English

The Green Mile
Directed by Frank Darabont
Produced by Frank Darabont
David Valdes
Written by Novel: Stephen King Screenplay: Frank Darabont
Starring Tom Hanks
David Morse
Bonnie Hunt
Michael Clarke Duncan
James Cromwell
Michael Jeter
Graham Greene
Doug Hutchison
Sam Rockwell
Barry Pepper
Jeffrey DeMunn
Patricia Clarkson
Harry Dean Stanton
Music by Thomas Newman
Cinematography David Tattersall
Editing by Richard Francis-Bruce
Distributed by Warner Bros.
Release date(s) December 10, 1999
Running time 188 min.
Country United States
Language English
Budget $60 million
Gross revenue $286,801,374
Official website
Allmovie profile
IMDb profile

The Green Mile is a 1999 drama movie. It was released on December 10 1999 in the United States. It stars Tom Hanks, David Morse, Bonnie Hunt, and Michael Clarke Duncan. It was directed by Frank Darabont.

Contents

Plot Summary

In 1935, inmates at the Cold Mountain Correctional Facility call Death Row "The Green Mile" because of the dark green linoleum that tiles the floor. Paul Edgecomb (Tom Hanks) is the head guard on the Green Mile when a new inmate is brought into his custody: John Coffey (Michael Clarke Duncan), convicted of the sadistic murder of two young girls. Despite his size and the fearsome crimes for which he's serving time, Coffey seems to be a kind and well-mannered person who behaves more like an innocent child than a hardened criminal. Soon Edgecomb and two of his fellow guards, Howell (David Morse) and Stanton Barry Pepper), notice something odd about Coffey: he's able to perform what seem to be miracles of healing among his fellow inmates, leading them to wonder just what sort of person he could be, and if he could have committed the crimes with which he was charged.

Awards

1999 Academy Awards[1]

  • Nominated - Best Performance by an Actor in a Supporting Role — Michael Clarke Duncan
  • Nominated - Best Picture — David Valdes, Frank Darabont
  • Nominated - Best Sound Mixing — Robert J. Litt, Elliot Tyson, Michael Herbick, Willie D. Burton
  • Nominated - Best Adapted Screenplay — Frank Darabont

2000 Academy of Science Fiction, Fantasy & Horror Films

  • Won - Best Supporting Actor — Michael Clarke Duncan
  • Won - Best Supporting Actress — Patricia Clarkson
  • Won - Best Action/Adventure/Thriller Film
  • Nominated - Best Director — Frank Darabont
  • Nominated - Best Music — Thomas Newman

2000 Broadcast Music Incorporated Film & TV Awards

  • Won - Film Music Award — Thomas Newman

2000 Black Reel Awards

2000 Blockbuster Entertainment Awards

  • Won - Favorite Actor - Drama — Tom Hanks
  • Nominated - Favorite Supporting Actor - Drama — Michael Clarke Duncan
  • Nominated - Favorite Supporting Actress - Drama — Bonnie Hunt

2000 Bram Stoker Awards

  • Nominated - Best Screenplay — Frank Darabont

2000 Broadcast Film Critics Association Awards

  • Won - Best Screenplay, Adaptation — Frank Darabont
  • Won - Best Supporting Actor — Michael Clarke Duncan
  • Nominated - Best Film

2000 Chicago Film Critics Association Awards

2000 Directors Guild of America

  • Nominated - Outstanding Directorial Achievement in Motion Pictures — Frank Darabont

2000 Golden Globe Awards

2000 NAACP Image Awards

2000 MTV Movie Awards

2000 Motion Picture Sound Editors (Golden Reel Awards)

  • Nominated - Best Sound Editing - Dialogue and ADR — Mark A. Mangini, Julia Evershade
  • Nominated - Best Sound Editing - Effects and Foley — Mark A. Mangini, Aaron Glascock, Howell Gibbens, David E. Stone, Solange S. Schwalbe

2000 People's Choice Awards

  • Won - Favorite All-Around Motion Picture
  • Won - Favorite Dramatic Motion Picture

2001 Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America (Nebula Award)

  • Nominated - Best Script — Frank Darabont

2000 Screen Actors Guild Awards

  • Nominated - Outstanding Performance by a Cast
  • Nominated - Outstanding Performance by a Male Actor in a Supporting Role — Michael Clarke Duncan

References

  1. "The 72nd Academy Awards." The New York Times - Breaking News, World News & Multimedia. <http://www.nytimes.com/library/film/oscars2000.html>.

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