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Verlag Heinz Heise GmbH & Co. KG
Headquarters Hannover, Germany
Key people Christian Heise; Ansgar Heise
Products magazines and telephone books
Employees about 650
Website www.heise-verlag.de

Heinz Heise is a German publishing house. It was created in Hanover in 1949 as an address and telephone directory publisher, then later expanded to include magazines and loose leaf collections. In 2001, the company was divided into separate enterprises, all of which came under the umbrella of their parent company, the Heise Media Group. Their turnover was in year 2008 at 108,7 million euro.

Heise publishes the magazines c't (the computer magazine with the highest number of subscribers in Europe), iX (focusing on topics for IT professionals), the German edition of Technology Review and the online magazine Telepolis. These publications feed into the Heise News Ticker, which ranks among the most successful German language news portals which includes a frequented user forum.

The company also owns Heise Online (heise.de), which As of December 2009 is a top 1000 website in the world, and a top 50 site in Germany according to Alexa traffic rankings.[1] In July 2006 heise Security was launched in the UK[2]— mostly featuring translated news from the German site, but also locally relevant stories, the UK version of heise online came in February 2008. In February 2009, the UK site was renamed to The H, and located at h-online.com.[3] In June 2007, a Polish heise online was launched.

Links from the Heise site can cause a massive increase in web traffic to the referenced sites and can cause some to become temporarily unavailable. While in the English-speaking world this is known as the Slashdot effect, among German speakers this is referred to as the Heise effect (in German: geheist, as one would say being slashdotted), or arguably inappropriately, Heise-DDoS.

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