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.The Intelligence of Dogs is a book on dog intelligence by Stanley Coren, a professor of psychology at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver.^ Stanley Coren is a professor at the University of British Columbia.
  • The Top 10 Most Intelligent Dog Breeds - Associated Content - associatedcontent.com 16 September 2009 9:09 UTC www.associatedcontent.com [Source type: General]

^ This list is based on the work of psychology professor Stanley Coren , who wrote the novel, “The Intelligence of Dogs.” .
  • A List of the Smartest Breeds of Dogs | The Paw Blog 30 January 2010 3:37 UTC www.thepawblog.com [Source type: General]

^ Coren is a dog expert and a professor of psychology at the University of British Columbia.
  • 5 most and least intelligent dogs - thestar.com 30 January 2010 3:37 UTC www.thestar.com [Source type: General]

[1] .Published in 1994, the book explains Coren's theories about the differences in intelligence between different breeds of dogs.^ Ranks dog breeds in order of intelligence.

^ In the book The Intelligence of Dogs, author Stanley Coren ranked the breed third for intelligence.
  • VonWitte German Shepherds 16 September 2009 9:09 UTC vonwitte.homestead.com [Source type: General]
  • Dog DNA Test - Dog Breed Testing - German Shepherd Dog 30 January 2010 3:37 UTC happydogdna.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]
  • Breed 30 January 2010 3:37 UTC boxerdoginfo.net [Source type: Original source]

^ Perhaps Coren's best accepted book is "The Intelligence of Dogs."
  • The intelligence of dogs | Blog News 16 September 2009 9:09 UTC www.thebaldchemist.com [Source type: General]
  • The intelligence of dogs | The Best Search Directories 16 September 2009 9:09 UTC www.visitlawrenceville.com [Source type: General]

[2][3][4]

Contents

Methodology

.The author used "understanding of new commands" and "obey first command" as his standards of intelligence.^ The author ranked the dogs according to their ability to understand new commands and obey the first command.
  • Your Guide to the Perfect Dog Companion | The Art of Manliness 30 January 2010 3:37 UTC artofmanliness.com [Source type: General]

^ He found that they had the ability to learn simple tasks after only five repetitions and obeyed the first command given 95% of the time.
  • VonWitte German Shepherds 16 September 2009 9:09 UTC vonwitte.homestead.com [Source type: General]
  • Dog DNA Test - Dog Breed Testing - German Shepherd Dog 30 January 2010 3:37 UTC happydogdna.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]
  • Breed 30 January 2010 3:37 UTC boxerdoginfo.net [Source type: Original source]

^ The respected scientist Stanley Coren has ranked the 10 brightest dog breeds , according to their ability to understand new commands in less than five repetitions and ability to obey first commands, 95 per cent of the time or better.
  • Canine Intelligence - un knol de Garry Jenkins 30 January 2010 3:37 UTC knol.google.com [Source type: General]

.He surveyed dog trainers and compiled this list of dog intelligence.^ The Top 10 of List of Intelligent Dogs, according to dog trainers, includes: 1.
  • Dog IQ Tests: Putting Pooch To The Test 30 January 2010 3:37 UTC www.learn-your-iq.com [Source type: General]

^ We've compiled a list of the top 10 most intelligent dogs ever.
  • The Top 10 Smartest Dog Breeds In The World 30 January 2010 3:37 UTC www.petmedsonline.org [Source type: General]
  • Top 10 Smartest Dog Breeds In The World | DailyCognition.com 30 January 2010 3:37 UTC www.dailycognition.com [Source type: Original source]

^ He has compiled a list of the world's smartest dogs.
  • Culture & Society Articles | Canine Researcher Reveals List of Smartest Dogs | Miller-McCune Online Magazine 30 January 2010 3:37 UTC www.miller-mccune.com [Source type: General]

.While this method of ordering dog intelligence is acceptable for training and working with dogs, it does not apply to the genetic intelligence which can be measured by ingenuity and understanding of common situations[citation needed].^ Ranks dog breeds in order of intelligence.

^ How does i-dog work ?
  • The Computer Revolution/Artificial Intelligence/I dog - Wikibooks, collection of open-content textbooks 30 January 2010 3:37 UTC en.wikibooks.org [Source type: General]

^ The more intelligent dogs demand training.
  • Your Guide to the Perfect Dog Companion | The Art of Manliness 30 January 2010 3:37 UTC artofmanliness.com [Source type: General]

The drawback of this rating scale, by the author's own admission, is that it is heavily weighted towards obedience (e.g. working or guard dogs) rather than understanding or creativity (e.g. hunting dogs), so some breeds may appear lower on the list due to their stubborn or independent nature, but this nature does not make them unintelligent or impossible to train. .The book includes other sections on hunting and other intelligence types, as well a general IQ for dogs that owners can perform on their dogs; that test is better weighted for ingenuity and independent problem solving, but rankings were provided only for working intelligence, and are listed below.^ However, this doesn’t mean that this is the “bad” dog, or any other dog from the list as well.
  • Most Dangerous Dogs in the World. 30 January 2010 3:37 UTC www.dirjournal.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Their intelligence makes them perfect dogs for hunting.

^ Benefits therapy dog work provides for you, your dog and others.

Ranking of dogs by breed

Brightest Dogs

  • Understanding of New Commands: Fewer than 5 repetitions.
  • Obey First Command: 95% of the time or better.
  1. Border Collie
  2. Poodle
  3. German Shepherd
  4. Golden Retriever
  5. Doberman Pinscher
  6. Shetland Sheepdog
  7. Labrador Retriever
  8. Papillon
  9. Rottweiler
  10. Australian Cattle Dog

Excellent Working Dogs

  • Understanding of New Commands: 5 to 15 repetitions.
  • Obey First Command: 85% of the time or better.
  1. Pembroke Welsh Corgi
  2. Miniature Schnauzer
  3. English Springer Spaniel
  4. Belgian Shepherd Tervuren
  5. Schipperke
    Belgian Sheepdog
  6. Collie
    Keeshond
  7. German Shorthaired Pointer
  8. Flat-Coated Retriever
    English Cocker Spaniel
    Standard Schnauzer
  9. Brittany
  10. Cocker Spaniel
  11. Weimaraner
  12. Belgian Malinois
    Bernese Mountain Dog
  13. Pomeranian
  14. Irish Water Spaniel
  15. Vizsla
  16. Cardigan Welsh Corgi

Above Average Working Dogs

  • Understanding of New Commands: 15 to 25 repetitions.
  • Obey First Command: 70% of the time or better
  1. Chesapeake Bay Retriever
    Puli
    Yorkshire Terrier
  2. Giant Schnauzer
  3. Airedale Terrier
    Bouvier des Flandres
  4. Border Terrier
    Briard
  5. Welsh Springer Spaniel
  6. Manchester Terrier
  7. Samoyed
  8. Field Spaniel
    Newfoundland
    Australian Terrier
    American Staffordshire Terrier
    Gordon Setter
    Bearded Collie
  9. Cairn Terrier
    Kerry Blue Terrier
    Irish Setter
  10. Norwegian Elkhound
  11. Affenpinscher
    Silky Terrier
    Miniature Pinscher
    English Setter
    Pharaoh Hound
    Clumber Spaniel
  12. Norwich Terrier
  13. Dalmatian

Average Working/Obedience Intelligence

  • Understanding of New Commands: 25 to 40 repetitions.
  • Obey First Command: 50% of the time or better.
  1. Soft-Coated Wheaten Terrier
    Bedlington Terrier
    Fox Terrier (Smooth)
  2. Curly Coated Retriever
    Irish Wolfhound
  3. Kuvasz
    Australian Shepherd
  4. Saluki
    Finnish Spitz
    Pointer
  5. Cavalier King Charles Spaniel
    German Wirehaired Pointer
    Black and Tan Coonhound
    American Water Spaniel
  6. Siberian Husky
    Bichon Frise
    English Toy Spaniel
  7. Tibetan Spaniel
    English Foxhound
    Otterhound
    American Foxhound
    Greyhound
    Wirehaired Pointing Griffon
  8. West Highland White Terrier
    Scottish Deerhound
  9. Boxer
    Great Dane
  10. Dachshund
    Staffordshire Bull Terrier
  11. Alaskan Malamute
  12. Whippet
    Chinese Shar Pei
    Wire Fox Terrier
  13. Rhodesian Ridgeback
  14. Ibizan Hound
    Welsh Terrier
    Irish Terrier
  15. Boston Terrier
    Akita

Fair Working/Obedience Intelligence

  • Obey First Command: 30% of the time or better.
  1. Skye Terrier
  2. Norfolk Terrier
    Sealyham Terrier
  3. Pug
  4. French Bulldog
  5. Brussels Griffon
    Maltese
  6. Italian Greyhound
  7. Chinese Crested
  8. Dandie Dinmont Terrier
    Petit Basset Griffon Vendeen
    Tibetan Terrier
    Japanese Chin
    Lakeland Terrier
  9. Old English Sheepdog
  10. Great Pyrenees
  11. Scottish Terrier
    Saint Bernard
  12. Bull Terrier
  13. Chihuahua
  14. Lhasa Apso
  15. Bullmastiff

Lowest Degree of Working/Obedience Intelligence

  • Understanding of New Commands: 80 to 100 repetitions or more.
  • Obey First Command: 25% of the time or worse.
  1. Shih Tzu
  2. Basset Hound
  3. Mastiff
  4. Beagle
  5. Pekingese
  6. Bloodhound
  7. Borzoi
  8. Chow Chow
  9. Bulldog
  10. Basenji
  11. Afghan Hound

See also

References

  1. ^ Coren, Stanley (1995). The Intelligence of Dogs: A Guide To The Thoughts, Emotions, And Inner Lives Of Our Canine Companions. Bantam Books. ISBN 0-553-37452-4. 
  2. ^ Boxer, Sarah (1994-06-05). "My Dog's Smarter Than Your Dog". NewYork Times. http://query.nytimes.com/gst/fullpage.html?res=9A04E2DA163BF936A35755C0A962958260&partner=rssnyt&emc=rss. 
  3. ^ Wade, Nicholas (1994-07-03). "METHOD AND MADNESS; What Dogs Think". NewYork Times. http://query.nytimes.com/gst/fullpage.html?res=9E0DE7DC1F3DF930A35754C0A962958260. 
  4. ^ Croke, Vicki (1994-04-21). "Growling at the dog list". Tribune New Service (published in the Boston Globe). http://www.accessmylibrary.com/coms2/summary_0286-5513441_ITM. 

Citable sentences

Up to date as of December 22, 2010

Here are sentences from other pages on The Intelligence of Dogs, which are similar to those in the above article.








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