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The Man Called Flintstone

Original poster
Directed by Joseph Barbera
William Hanna
Produced by Joseph Barbera
William Hanna
Written by Ray Allen (story)
Joseph Barbera
Harvey Bullock (story)
Warren Foster
William Hanna
Alex Lovy
Starring Alan Reed
Mel Blanc
Jean Vander Pyl
Gerry Johnson
Paul Frees
June Foray
Music by Doug Goodwin (songs)
John McCarthy (songs)
Ted Nichols
Marty Paich
Cinematography Dick Blundell
Gene Borghi
Charles Flekal
Bill Kotler
etc.
Studio Hanna-Barbera
Distributed by Columbia Pictures
Release date(s) United States
August 3, 1966
Australia
April 7, 1967
Running time 87 minutes
Country United States
Language English
Followed by The Flintstones

The Man Called Flintstone is an animated musical film produced by Hanna-Barbera Productions and released in 1966 by Columbia Pictures. It was the second Hanna-Barbera feature, after Hey There, It's Yogi Bear! (1964).[1]

The film is a theatrical spin-off of the 1960-66 television series, The Flintstones, and is a swan song of the TV show, made immediately following the end of production on the series.

Contents

Plot

The Man Called Flintstone is a spoof of the James Bond films, and also borrows elements from several episodes of the Flintstones TV series.

In the film, Fred Flintstone (voiced by Alan Reed) is recruited by a secret organization to take the place of Rock Slag, an injured agent (voiced by Paul Frees) who happens to be Fred's doppelgänger. His mission: to travel to "Eurock" (under the guise of a family vacation) and catch the evil Green Goose (also voiced by Paul Frees). The catch is Fred is unable to tell his family or friends about the mission. Mel Blanc once again provides the voice of Fred's sidekick, Barney Rubble. The movie includes numerous musical interludes, including one song performed by Louis Prima. The singing voice of Fred is provided by Henry Corden, who would go on to fully assume the role of Fred after Reed's death in 1977.

The film borrows themes from several episodes of the TV series, including an episode in which Fred becomes involved in a spy caper spoofing Goldfinger, and another in which he encounters JL Gotrocks, the world's richest man, and his exact double. The popular theme song itself from the show was never used.

The working title of the film was That Man Flintstone[2] with the film poster featuring Fred in the same pose of the Bob Peak poster for Our Man Flint.

Reception

Variety gave the The Man Called Flintstone a positive review on August 10, 1966, calling the production "excellent" and noting that the "stone-age scenery and machinery are mildly amusing and sometimes highly inventive". The review judges that the plot is a fast-moving and clever spoof of contemporary spy films.[3] The film was a minor success upon its original release, but in the succeeding years became more popular at cinema matinees, and on television.

DVD release

In 2005, a North American DVD version was released by Warner Home Video. However, owing to licensing complications between Warner Bros. (current owners of the Flintstones property) and Sony (current owners of then-Flintstones distributor Columbia Pictures/Screen Gems), only a Canadian release occurred; a United States release was canceled and would not be rescheduled until the rights issue was cleared in August 2008. The DVD was released in the United States on December 2, 2008, along with a DVD of Hey There, It's Yogi Bear!, a film with which The Man Called Flintstone was released as a double-bill during the 1970s.[4]

See also

References

  1. ^ Beck, Jerry. The Animated Movie Guide. Chicago: Chicago Review Press, 2005. ISBN 1-55652-591-5. pp. 160-161.
  2. ^ p. 161 Beck. Jerry The Animated Movie Guide 2005 Chicago Review Press
  3. ^ The Man Called Flintstone (film review). Variety, August 10, 1966
  4. ^ TVShowsOnDVD.com news report of the DVD's release

External links


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