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Stanford Daily logo
Type Daily student newspaper
Format Broadsheet
Owner The Stanford Daily Publishing Corporation
Editor-in-chief Devin Banerjee
Founded 1892
Headquarters Lorry I. Lokey Stanford Daily Building
456 Panama Mall
Stanford, CA 94305
United States
Circulation 10,000
Official website stanforddaily.com

The Stanford Daily is the student-run, independent daily newspaper serving Stanford University. The Daily is distributed throughout campus and the surrounding community of Palo Alto, California, United States. It has published since the University was founded in 1892.[1]

The paper publishes weekdays during the academic year. Unlike many other campus publications, it enjoys a wide circulation of 10,000 and is distributed at 500 locations throughout the Stanford campus, including dormitory dining halls, and in the city of Palo Alto. In addition to the daily newspaper, the Daily publishes two weekly supplements: Intermission, a weekly pullout entertainment section, and Cardinal Today, a weekly sports "outsert" during football and basketball seasons. The Daily also published several special issues every year: The Orientation Issue, Big Game Issue, and The Commencement Issue. In the fall of 2008, staffers moved into a state-of-the-art building near the recently renovated Old Student Union.

Contents

History

The paper began as a small student publication known as The Daily Palo Alto serving the Palo Alto area and the university. It "has been Stanford’s only news outlet operating continuously since the birth of the [u]niversity."[2]

In the late 1960s and early 1970s, as baby boomer college students increasingly questioned authority and asserted generational independence,[3] and Stanford administrators became worried about liability for the paper's editorials, the paper and the University severed ties.[4] In 1973 students founded The Stanford Daily Publishing Corporation, a non-profit corporation, to operate the newspaper. A significant event leading to the paper's independence was its initiation of a legal battle to protect the identities of unnamed Vietnam War protesters pictured in photos printed in the paper. The case went all the way to the Supreme Court, where the newspaper faced off against the Palo Alto Police Department in Zurcher v. Stanford Daily. The Court ruled 5–3 against the paper.

In the 1980s, a volunteer group of alumni founded The Friends of The Daily to provide support for the newspaper. This nonprofit entity is often referred to by Stanford students as the "Friends."

In 1982, after the Stanford football team officially lost the Big Game (football) against cross-bay rival University of California at Berkeley ("Cal") due to what has become known as "The Play," The Daily published a fake edition of the Daily Californian, Cal's student newspaper, announcing officials had reversed the game's outcome. Styled as an "extra," the bogus paper headlined NCAA AWARDS BIG GAME TO STANFORD. The Daily distributed 7,000 copies around the Berkeley campus early in the morning, before that day's Cal student paper was released. The prank has been credited to Stanford undergraduates Tony Kelly, Mark Zeigler, Adam Berns and Daily editor-in-chief Richard Klinger. [5][6]

The Stanford Daily is an affiliate of UWIRE [7], which distributes and promotes the paper's content to its network.

Notable alumni

See also

References

  1. ^ "About the Daily". The Stanford Daily. http://www.stanforddaily.com/cgi-bin/?page_id=19/. Retrieved 2008-02-08.  
  2. ^ Fischer, Joannie, "Read All About It", Stanford Magazine, March/April 2003
  3. ^ Brokaw, Tom, "Boom! Voices of the Sixties" (Random House 2007)
  4. ^ Fischer 2003
  5. ^ Fimrite, Ron, "The Anatomy Of A Miracle," in Sports Illustrated, September 1, 1983, Vol. 59, No. 10, pp. 227-228
  6. ^ http://www.cs.berkeley.edu/~pattrsn/anatomyofmiracle.htm
  7. ^ http://www.uwire.com/content/affiliates.html
  8. ^ http://www.nytimes.com/2002/02/22/world/a-nation-challenged-journalists-us-says-video-shows-captors-killed-reporter.html

External links

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