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The Vancouver Sun
The Vancouver Sun.svg
Type Daily newspaper
Format Broadsheet
Owner CanWest Global Communications Corp.
Publisher Kevin D. Bent
Founded 1912
Political alignment Right-wing
Headquarters 200 Granville St. Suite 1 Vancouver, BC, V6C 3N3 Canada
ISSN 0832-1299
Official website www.vancouversun.com

The Vancouver Sun is a daily newspaper first published in the Canadian province of British Columbia on February 12, 1912. The paper is currently published by the Pacific Newspaper Group, a division of CanWest MediaWorks Publications Inc., which is affiliated with CanWest Global Communications company.[2] It is published six days a week, Monday to Saturday.

Although its staff of reporters has shrunken considerably in recent years, the Sun still has the largest newsroom in Vancouver. The Sun is a broadsheet newspaper and is not part of the Sun Media chain that operates tabloid papers in Toronto, Ottawa, Winnipeg, Calgary and Edmonton.

Contents

History

The Sun Tower was the newspaper's home from 1937 to 1965.

When the Sun began operation, it was published at 125 West Pender Street, just around the corner from The Province, its rival newspaper at the time.

In 1924, the Sun bought the Vancouver World newspaper, which had been in financial difficulty for some time.

In March 1937, a fire destroyed the Sun's business and editorial offices. The only casualty was the janitor, who suffered minor burns and smoke inhalation. The Sun promptly moved across the street into the World Building, where the World had previously been published. The building was accordingly renamed the Sun Tower.

In 1958, the Sun and the Province joined to create the Pacific Press in response to the rising costs of producing newspapers. First the papers merged their mechanical and financial departments, then they both moved into the Pacific Press Building on December 27, 1965.

The paper moved to Granville Square in 1997.

According to a recent NADbank survey, the Sun's daily readership was 499,800, making it British Columbia's second most read newspaper, after The Province. Its six-day average circulation was 203,390 copies a day as of December 31, 2001.

In May 2009, the newspaper laid off long-time editorial cartoonist Roy Peterson who had been drawing for the paper since 1962.[1]

Sections

The Sun has multiple sections. Its main, or A, section usually contains the top local stories of the day along with local columns. The B section features national and world news, along with analysis. The paper also has daily Arts & Life, BusinessBC and Sports sections. On Thursdays, The Sun publishes a tabloid entertainment section called Westcoast Life. On Saturdays, there is a section called Weekend Review with columnists, features and articles on science. The Sun also publishes a popular editorial section each fall called BC's Top Employers, profiling employers in the province with progressive and interesting workplace policies.[2]

Politics

The Vancouver Sun is owned by media giant Canwest Media, which has historically been right of center. In the 2006 election, the Sun supported the Conservative party. The editorial board has consistently supported the center-right BC Liberals and many of its policies. Senior editor Fazil Mihlar formerly worked for the Fraser Institute, that issues Report Cards for many Canadian provinces, ranking schools based on their students' performance on standardized examinations.

Criticisms

It has been argued by many media critics and journalists that the Vancouver Sun's corporate owner, CanWest, exhibits a virtual monopoly over the Vancouver news market. [3] Further to this, the Sun was featured in an article by writer Sean Condon in the September 2007 issue of Adbusters, in which the article was strongly critical of the Sun and its role in the Vancouver newspaper market.[4]

Senior Editors

  • Patricia Graham, Editor in Chief
  • Kirk LaPointe, Managing Editor
  • Harold Munro, Deputy Managing Editor
  • Paul Bucci, Deputy Managing Editor
  • Fazil Mihlar, Editorial Page Editor

Columnists

  • David Baines
  • Daphne Bramham
  • Don Cayo
  • Cam Cole
  • Shelley Fralic
  • Anthony Gismondi
  • Stephen Hume
  • Jonathan Manthorpe
  • Craig McInnes
  • Peter McKnight
  • Pete McMartin
  • Fazil Mihlar
  • Ian Mulgrew
  • Vaughn Palmer
  • Malcolm Parry
  • Doug Todd
  • Steve Whysall
  • Barbara Yaffe

Reporters

  • Andrews, Marke (Business)
  • Bates, Linda (Features)
  • Beamish, Mike (Sports)
  • Bellett, Gerry (News)
  • Birnie, Peter (Features)
  • Boei, Bill (News)
  • Bolan, Kim (News)
  • Cernetig, Miro (Victoria Bureau)
  • Constantineau, Bruce (Business)
  • Culbert, Lori (News)
  • Fayerman, Pamela (Health)
  • Fowlie, Johnathan (News)
  • Gram, Karen (Features)
  • Griffin, Kevin (Culture & Arts)
  • Hall, Neal (News)
  • Hamilton, Gordon (Business)
  • Kane, Michael (Business)
  • Kingston, Gary (Sports)
  • Lee, Jeff (2010 Winter Olympics)
  • Lee, Jenny (Features)
  • Lee-Young, Joanne (Business)
  • Little, Lyndon (Sports)
  • MacIntyre, Iain (Sports)
  • Mackie, John (Features)
  • O'Brian, Amy (Features)
  • Pap, Elliott (Sports)
  • Pemberton, Kim (Features)
  • Penner, Derrick (Business)
  • Pynn, Larry (News)
  • Scott, Michael (News)
  • Shaw, Gillian (Business)
  • Simpson, Scott (Business)
  • Skelton, Chad (News)
  • Stainsby, Mia (Features)
  • Steffenhagen, Janet (Education)
  • Todd, Douglas (Religion)
  • Walker, Ian (Sports)
  • Ward, Doug (News)
  • Whysall, Steve (Gardening)
  • Wigod, Rebecca (Books)
  • Zacharias, Yvonne (Features)
  • Ziemer, Brad (Sports)

References

  1. ^ Association of American Editorial Cartoonists News, June 14, 2009[1]
  2. ^ "BC's Top 20 Employers (2005)". http://working.canada.com/vancouver/resources/topemployers/index.html.  
  3. ^ "Crisis of Concentration" This Magazine, May-June 2005, by Tim Querengesser
  4. ^ Sean Condon (September 13, 2007). "The Death of Canadian Journalism". Adbusters. http://www.adbusters.org/magazine/73/The_Death_of_Canadian_Journalism.html. Retrieved 2009-03-02.  

See also

External links

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