The Full Wiki

More info on The Wearing of the Green

The Wearing of the Green: Wikis

Advertisements
  
  

Note: Many of our articles have direct quotes from sources you can cite, within the Wikipedia article! This article doesn't yet, but we're working on it! See more info or our list of citable articles.

Encyclopedia

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

"The Wearing of the Green" is an anonymously-penned Irish street ballad dating to 1798. The context of the song is the repression around the time of the Irish Rebellion of 1798. Wearing a shamrock in the "caubeen" (hat) was a sign of rebellion and green was the colour of the Society of the United Irishmen, a republican revolutionary organisation. During the period, displaying revolutionary insignia was made punishable by hanging.

Contents

Lyrics

Many versions of the lyrics exist.[1] The best-known version is by Dion Boucicault, adapted for his 1864 play Arragh na Pogue, or the Wicklow Wedding, set in County Wicklow during the 1798 rebellion.[2] In the second verse, Boucicault's version recounts an encounter between the singer and Napper Tandy, an Irish rebel leader exiled in France. In earlier versions of the ballad, [3][4], and the similar "Green Among the Cape",[5] it is Napoleon Bonaparte who asks how Ireland is.

Boucicault's addition of the third and last verse is in notable contrast to the middle verse, in advocating emigration to America rather staying in defiance. Boucicault himself fled to New York after leaving his wife for a young actress.

Recordings

Artists to have recorded the song include John McCormack (1904, again in 1912), Judy Garland (1940), The Wolfe Tones (1985), and Orthodox Celts (1997)

Related songs

Her faithful sons will ever sing "The Wearing of the Green"[6]

References

  1. ^ Blaisdell, Robert (2002). Irish Verse: An Anthology. Courier Dover. p. 84. ISBN 0486419142.  
  2. ^ Vance, Norman (2002). Irish Literature Since 1800. Pearson Education. pp. 81–2. ISBN 0582494788.  
  3. ^ "The Ballad Poetry of Ireland". The Living Age: p.107. 1845-10-18.  
  4. ^ "Celtic Gossip". The Celt: p.94. April 1858.  
  5. ^ a b Carpenter, Andrew (1998). Verse in English from Eighteenth-Century Ireland. Cork: Cork University Press. p. 573. ISBN 1859181031.  
  6. ^ Hayes, Edward (1855). The Ballads of Ireland (4th ed.). New York: Fullarton. Vol I, p.271.  

External links

  • [1] — Lyrics of The Wearing of the Green
Advertisements

Source material

Up to date as of January 22, 2010

From Wikisource

The Wearing of the Green
by Dion Boucicault
"The Wearing of the Green" is an anonymous Irish street ballad dating to 1798. The context of the song is the repression around the time of the Irish Rebellion of 1798. Wearing a shamrock in the "caubeen" (hat) was a sign of rebellion and green was the colour of the Society of the United Irishmen, a republican revolutionary organisation. During the period, displaying revolutionary insignia was made punishable by hanging.— Excerpted from The Wearing of the Green on Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.

This is the 1864 version by Dion Boucicault, written for his 1864 play Arragh na Pogue, or the Wicklow Wedding.

O Paddy dear, an' did ye hear the news that's goin' round? Dion Boucicault

O Paddy dear, an' did ye hear the news that's goin' round?
The shamrock is by law forbid to grow on Irish ground;
St. Patrick's Day no more we'll keep, his colour can't be seen,
For there's a cruel law agin the wearin' o' the Green.
I met wid Napper Tandy and he took me by the hand,
And he said, "How's dear ould Ireland, and how does she stand?"
She's the most distressful country that ever yet was seen,
For they're hangin' men an' women there for the wearin' o' the Green.
Then since the colour we must wear is England's cruel red,
Sure Ireland's sons will ne'er forget the blood that they have shed,
You may take a shamrock from your hat and cast it on the sod,
It will take root and flourish there though underfoot it's trod.
When law can stop the blades of grass from growin' as they grow,
And when the leaves in summer-time their colour dare not show,
Then will I change the colour, too, I wear in my caubeen
But 'till that day, please God, I'll stick to wearin' o' the Green.
But if at last our colour should be torn from Ireland's heart,
Her sons with shame and sorrow from the dear old isle will part;
I've heard a whisper of a land that lies beyond the sea
Where rich and poor stand equal in the light of freedom's day.
O Erin, must we leave you driven by a tyrant's hand?
Must we ask a mother's blessing from a strange and distant land?
Where the cruel cross of England shall nevermore be seen,
And where, please God, we'll live and die still wearin' o' the green!
PD-icon.svg This work published before January 1, 1923 is in the public domain worldwide because the author died at least 100 years ago.

Advertisements






Got something to say? Make a comment.
Your name
Your email address
Message