The Full Wiki

More info on Thesis, antithesis, synthesis

Thesis, antithesis, synthesis: Wikis

  
  

Note: Many of our articles have direct quotes from sources you can cite, within the Wikipedia article! This article doesn't yet, but we're working on it! See more info or our list of citable articles.

Encyclopedia

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel00.jpg
Part of a series on
G. W. F. Hegel
Hegelianism
Absolute idealism
British & German idealism
Dialectic
Master-slave dialectic
Works
Phenomenology of Spirit
Science of Logic
Philosophy of Right
Philosophy of History
Notable People
Immanuel Kant
Johann Wolfgang von Goethe
Johann Gottlieb Fichte
Friedrich Hölderlin
Friedrich Schelling
Arthur Schopenhauer
Søren Kierkegaard
Karl Marx
Related
Right Hegelians
Young Hegelians
Marx's theory of alienation
The Secret of Hegel

Although he never used the terms himself, the triad thesis, antithesis, synthesis is often used to describe the thought of German philosopher Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel.

The triad is usually described in the following way:

  • The thesis is an intellectual proposition.
  • The antithesis is simply the negation of the thesis, a reaction to the proposition.
  • The synthesis solves the conflict between the thesis and antithesis by reconciling their common truths, and forming a new proposition.

According to Walter Kaufman, although the triad is often [1] thought to form part of an analysis of historical and philosophical progress called the Hegelian dialectic, the assumption is erroneous. Hegel used this classification only once, and he attributed the terminology to Immanuel Kant. The terminology was largely developed earlier by the neo-Kantian Johann Gottlieb Fichte, also an advocate of the philosophy identified as German idealism.

The triad is often said to have been extended and adopted by Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels, however, Marx referred to them in The Poverty of Philosophy as speaking Greek and "Wooden trichotomies".

References

  1. ^ Walter Kaufmann (1966). "§ 37". Hegel: A Reinterpretation. Anchor Books. ISBN 0268010684. OCLC 3168016. "Whoever looks for the stereotype of the allegedly Hegelian dialectic in Hegel's Phenomenology will not find it. What one does find on looking at the table of contents is a very decided preference for triadic arrangements. ... But these many triads are not presented or deduced by Hegel as so many theses, antitheses, and syntheses. It is not by means of any dialectic of that sort that his thought moves up the ladder to absolute knowledge."  

See also

External links








Got something to say? Make a comment.
Your name
Your email address
Message