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Third Battle of Artois
Part of the Western Front of World War I
Date 15 September – 4 November 1915
Location Artois, France
Result Stalemate
Belligerents
France France
United Kingdom United Kingdom
German Empire German Empire
Commanders
France Auguste Dubail
United Kingdom John French
German Empire Crown Prince Rupprecht
Strength
French Tenth Army
6 British Divisions
German Sixth Army
Casualties and losses
48,000 French[1]
62,000 British[2]
51,000 German[3]

The Third Battle of Artois was a battle on the Western Front of World War I, is also known as the Loos-Artois Offensive, including the major British Battle of Loos.

The offensive, meant to complement Champagne offensive, was Joffre's last attempt to exploit the Allies numerical advantage over Germany's decision to concentrate its forces against Russia. Joffre's plan was for simultaneous attacks in Champagne and Artois, with the goal being to capture German railborne supply centers at Attigny and Douai and forcing a German withdrawl.

Prelude

Joffre's plan was a series of attacks along with Western Front, from the Italian's attacking across the Isonzo River to the BEF launching an attack near Loos. At first, Field Marshal John French and General Sir Douglas Haig were against such an operation, due to lack of heavy artillery, ammunition, and troop reserves. However, pressure from British minister of war, Lord Horatio Kitchner, prompted French and Haig to agree to the military operation.

Notes

  1. ^ The European powers in the First World War: an encyclopedia, Ed. Spencer Tucker, Laura Matysek Wood and Justin D. Murphy, (Taylor & Francis, 1999), 80.
  2. ^ The European powers in the First World War: an encyclopedia, 80.
  3. ^ The European powers in the First World War: an encyclopedia, 80.

References

  • The European powers in the First World War: an encyclopedia, Ed. Spencer Tucker, Laura Matysek Wood and Justin D. Murphy, Taylor & Francis, 1999.

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