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From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Thomas may refer to:

In people:

In business:

In food:

  • Thomas', a brand of English muffins and bagels in North America

In music:

  • "Thomas," a song by A Perfect Circle from their 2000 album Mer de Noms

In places:

In religion:

In sociology:

In television:

In math:

  • Thomas algorithm, a numerical algorithm to solve a tridiagonal system of equations

See also


1911 encyclopedia

Up to date as of January 14, 2010

From LoveToKnow 1911

THOMAS (d. 1 ioo), archbishop of York, was a native of Bayeux, and is usually called Thomas of Bayeux. His father was a priest named Osbert, and Samson, bishop of Worcester from 1086 until his death in May 1112, was his brother. Owing largely to the generosity of Odo, bishop of Bayeux, Thomas studied in France, Germany and Spain and became known as a scholar; then he became one of Bishop Odo's officials and after 1066 one of William the Conqueror's chaplains, or secretaries. In 1070 he succeeded Aldred as archbishop of York, but declining to promise obedience to the archbishop of Canterbury, Lanfranc, the latter prelate refused to consecrate him. King William, however, induced him to submit and he was consecrated, but his profession of obedience was to Lanfranc personally and not to the archbishops of Canterbury. In 1071 both archbishops travelled to Rome for their palls and while there Thomas wished Pope Alexander II. to decree the equality of the sees of Canterbury and York. The pope, however, referred the dispute to a council of English prelates, and this met at Windsor at Whitsuntide 1072. It was then decided that the archbishop of Canterbury was the superior of the archbishop of York, who had no rights south of the Humber, but whose province included Scotland. But this decision did not put a period to the dispute. It broke out again, and in 1092 and again in 1093 Thomas protested against what he regarded as infringements of his archiepiscopal rights. The first of these occasions was over the dedication of the cathedral built by Remigius at Lincoln and the second was over the consecration of St Anselm to the archbishopric of Canterbury. In 1 ioo, during Anselm's exile, Thomas reached London too late to crown Henry I., the ceremony having been hurriedly performed by Maurice, bishop of London, but his anger at this slight was soon appeased. He died at York on the 18th of November i ioo. Thomas rebuilt the minster at York, where he appears to have been an excellent archbishop; he knew something of church music and wrote hymns.

Thomas had a nephew, Thomas, the son of his brother Samson, who was also archbishop of York. The younger Thomas became archbishop in i 108 and like his uncle he refused to promise obedience to the archbishop of Canterbury; his consecration was then delayed and the dispute was still unsettled when St Anselm died in April 1109. Henry I. and his bishops then decided against Thomas, who was forced to make the necessary promise and was consecrated in London in June 1109. He died at Beverley on the 24th of February 1114.


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Wiktionary

Up to date as of January 15, 2010

Definition from Wiktionary, a free dictionary

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English

Etymology

From Ancient Greek Θωμᾶς, from Aramaic ܬܐܘܡܐ or תאומא (Thomas), from ܬܐܡܐ or תאמא (twin).

Pronunciation

Noun

Thomas

  1. (derogatory) An infidel (used by Christians in reference to the Apostle).

Proper noun

Singular
Thomas

Plural
-

Thomas

  1. (Biblical) An Apostle, best remembered for doubting the resurrection of Jesus.
  2. A male given name of biblical origin, popular since the 13th century.
  3. A patronymic surname.

Related terms

Quotations

  • 1611, King James Version of the Bible (Authorized Version), John 20:24-25
    But Thomas, one of the twelve, called Didymus, was not with them when Jesus came. The other disciples therefore said unto him, We have seen the LORD. But he said unto them, Except I shall see in his hands the print of the nails, and put my finger into the print of the nails, and thrust my hand into his side, I will not believe.
  • 1876, Mark Twain, The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, ch. VI
    "Becky Thatcher. What's yours? Oh, I know. It's Thomas Sawyer."
    "That's the name they lick me by. I'm Tom when I'm good. You call me Tom, will you?"
  • 1941 Judith Kelly, Marriage is a Private Affair, Harper 1944, page 133:
    - - - goodness we scarcely have a name for the baby yet now all of you must take a vote, all of you, but let's have a nice simple name like Thomas don't you think I hate elaborate names, do please all of you vote for Thomas..."

Translations


Danish

Alternative spellings

Proper noun

Thomas

  1. (Biblical) Thomas.
  2. A male given name of biblical origin.

Related terms


Dutch

Alternative spellings

Proper noun

Thomas

  1. A male given name of biblical origin.
  2. A patronymic surname.

Related terms

  • Tom
  • (surnames) Thomasse, Thomassen

French

Proper noun

Thomas m.

  1. (Biblical) Thomas.
  2. A male given name of biblical origin.
  3. A patronymic surname.

German

Proper noun

Thomas

  1. (Biblical) Thomas.
  2. A male given name of biblical origin.
  3. A patronymic surname.

Related terms


Norwegian

Proper noun

Thomas

  1. A male given name, a popular spelling variant of Tomas.

Swedish

Proper noun

Thomas

  1. A male given name, a popular spelling variant of Tomas.

Wikispecies

Up to date as of January 23, 2010
(Redirected to Oldfield Thomas article)

From Wikispecies

(21.II.1858 - 16.VI.1929)

English zoologist


Bible wiki

Up to date as of January 23, 2010

From BibleWiki

The Twelve
Andrew
Bartholomew
James, son of Alphaeus
James, son of Zebedee
John, son of Zebedee
Judas Iscariot
Lebbaeus Thaddaeus
Matthew
Philip
Simon Peter
Simon Zelotes
Thomas

Meaning: twin

One of the twelve (Mt 10:3; Mk 3:18, etc.). He was also called Didymus (Jn 11:16; Jn 20:24), which is the Greek equivalent of the Hebrew name. All we know regarding him is recorded in the fourth Gospel (Jn 11:15f; Jn 14:4f; Jn 20:24ff). From the circumstance that in the lists of the apostles he is always mentioned along with Matthew, who was the son of Alphaeus (Mk 3:18), and that these two are always followed by James, who was also the son of Alphaeus, it has been supposed that these three, Matthew, Thomas, and James, were brothers.

In the Apocryphal Acts of Thomas, his name is the basis for his identification as the twin brother of Jesus. He is responsible for the expression "doubting Thomas" because he didn't recognize Jesus in ascension and demanded physical proof. "Except I shall see in his hands the print of the nails, and put my finger into the place of the nails, and put my hand into his side, I will not believe" (Jn 20:25ff)

This entry includes text from Easton's Bible Dictionary, 1897.

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