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The 2nd Earl of Ailesbury.

Thomas Bruce, 3rd Earl of Elgin and 2nd Earl of Ailesbury (1656 – 16 December 1741) was the son of Robert Bruce, 2nd Earl of Elgin and Lady Diana Grey. His maternal grandparents were Henry Grey, 1st Earl of Stamford and Lady Anne Cecil, daughter of William Cecil, 2nd Earl of Exeter.

Lord Bruce, as he was styled from 1663 to 1685, was M.P. for Marlborough between 1679 and 1681 and M.P. for Wiltshire in 1685. From 1685, when he inherited the earldom, to 1688, he was a Lord of the Bedchamber, Lord Lieutenant of Bedfordshire and Huntingdonshire (the latter in the absence of the Earl of Sandwich) and was a Page of Honour, at the coronation of King James II on 23 April 1685.

He married, firstly, Lady Elizabeth Seymour,[1] granddaughter of William Seymour, 2nd Duke of Somerset, on 31 August 1676. They had two children:

He married, secondly, Charlotte d'Argenteau, comtesse d'Esneux,[1] in Brussels (St Jacques sur Coudenberg) on 27 April 1700. They had one daughter:

He was one of only four peers who continued to support James II after the Prince of Orange embarked for England. On 18 December 1688 he accompanied King James to Rochester when he fled London. In May 1695, Lord Elgin was accused of having conspired to plan the restoration of King James II and in February 1696 he was imprisoned in the Tower of London,[2] but admitted to bail a year later and allowed to leave England for Brussels, where he died and was buried.

Notes

Parliament of England
Preceded by
Thomas Bennet
Edward Goddard
Member of Parliament for Marlborough
1679–1685
Served alongside: Thomas Bennet
Succeeded by
Sir John Ernle
Sir George Willoughby
Preceded by
Thomas Thynne
Sir Walter St John
Member of Parliament for Wiltshire
1685
Served alongside: Viscount Cornbury
Succeeded by
Viscount Cornbury
Sir Thomas Mompesson
Honorary titles
Preceded by
The Earl of Elgin
Lord Lieutenant of Bedfordshire
1685–1689
Succeeded by
The Earl of Bedford
Lord Lieutenant of Huntingdonshire
(in the absence of The Earl of Sandwich)
1685–1689
Succeeded by
The Earl of Manchester
Peerage of Scotland
Preceded by
Robert Bruce
Earl of Elgin
1685–1741
Succeeded by
Charles Bruce
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The Earl of Ailesbury
Spouse(s) Lady Elizabeth Seymour
Charlotte d'Argenteau
Father Robert Bruce, 2nd Earl of Elgin
Mother Lady Diana Grey
Born 1656
Died 16 December 1741

Thomas Bruce, 2nd Earl of Ailesbury and 3rd Earl of Elgin (1656 – 16 December 1741) was the son of Robert Bruce, 2nd Earl of Elgin and Lady Diana Grey. His maternal grandparents were Henry Grey, 1st Earl of Stamford and Lady Anne Cecil, daughter of William Cecil, 2nd Earl of Exeter.

Lord Bruce, as he was styled from 1663 to 1685, was M.P. for Marlborough between 1679 and 1681 and M.P. for Wiltshire in 1685. From 1685, when he inherited the earldom, to 1688, he was a Lord of the Bedchamber, Lord Lieutenant of Bedfordshire and Huntingdonshire (the latter in the absence of the Earl of Sandwich) and was a Page of Honour, at the coronation of King James II on 23 April 1685.

He married, firstly, Lady Elizabeth Seymour,[1] granddaughter of William Seymour, 2nd Duke of Somerset, on 31 August 1676. They had three children:

  • Robert Bruce, Lord Bruce (1679-b1741)
  • Charles Bruce, 4th Earl of Elgin (1682–1747)
  • Hon. Elizabeth Bruce (1689–1745), married George Brudenell, 3rd Earl of Cardigan and had issue.[1]

He married, secondly, Charlotte d'Argenteau, comtesse d'Esneux,[1] in Brussels (St Jacques sur Coudenberg) on 27 April 1700. They had one daughter:

He was one of only four peers who continued to support James II after the Prince of Orange embarked for England. On 18 December 1688 he accompanied King James to Rochester when he fled London. In May 1695, Lord Elgin was accused of having conspired to plan the restoration of King James II and in February 1696 he was imprisoned in the Tower of London,[2] but admitted to bail a year later and allowed to leave England for Brussels, where he died and was buried.

Notes

Parliament of England
Preceded by
Thomas Bennet
Edward Goddard
Member of Parliament for Marlborough
1679–1685
Served alongside: Thomas Bennet
Succeeded by
Sir John Ernle
Sir George Willoughby
Preceded by
Thomas Thynne
Sir Walter St John
Member of Parliament for Wiltshire
1685
Served alongside: Viscount Cornbury
Succeeded by
Viscount Cornbury
Sir Thomas Mompesson
Honorary titles
Preceded by
The Earl of Elgin
Lord Lieutenant of Bedfordshire
1685–1689
Succeeded by
The Earl of Bedford
Lord Lieutenant of Huntingdonshire
(in the absence of The Earl of Sandwich)
1685–1689
Succeeded by
The Earl of Manchester
Peerage of England
Preceded by
Robert Bruce
Earl of Ailesbury
1685–1741
Succeeded by
Charles Bruce
Baron Bruce of Whorlton
(descended by acceleration)

1685–1711
Peerage of Scotland
Preceded by
Robert Bruce
Earl of Elgin
1685–1741
Succeeded by
Charles Bruce


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