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Thomas Fyshe Palmer (1747–1802) was an English-born Unitarian minister, political reformer and political exile.

Palmer was born in Ickwell, Bedfordshire, England, the son of Henry Fyshe who assumed the added name of Palmer because of an inheritance, and Elizabeth, daughter of James Ingram of Barnet. Palmer was educated at Eton college and Queen's College, Cambridge gaining a Bachelor of Divinity in 1781. Palmer was curate at Leatherhead in Surrey for a short while but had become disillusioned with some aspects of the Church of England. For the next ten years Palmer preached Unitarianism to congregations in Dundee and other Scottish towns.

Palmer had arranged for printing and distribution of Address to the People concerning parliamentary reform, written by George Mealmaker. For this, Palmer was tried for seditious practices on 12 September 1793, convicted, and sentenced to seven years transportation.

Palmer left in the Surprize along with the Scottish Martyrs, Thomas Muir, William Skirving and Maurice Margarot in April 1794. Whilst serving his seven years of exile in Sydney Palmer did not suffer the usual convist restraint and engaged in several business enterprises, including shipbuilding.

After Palmer's sentence expired, he bought a Spanish ship along with two others and headed for England. However the ship was declared unseaworthy in Guam where Palmer later died.

See also

References


Thomas Fyshe Palmer (1747–1802) was an English-born Unitarian minister, political reformer and political exile.

Palmer was born in Ickwell, Bedfordshire, England, the son of Henry Fyshe who assumed the added name of Palmer because of an inheritance, and Elizabeth, daughter of James Ingram of Barnet. Palmer was educated at Eton college and Queen's College, Cambridge gaining a Bachelor of Divinity in 1781.[1] Palmer was curate at Leatherhead in Surrey for a short while but had become disillusioned with some aspects of the Church of England. For the next ten years Palmer preached Unitarianism to congregations in Dundee and other Scottish towns.

Palmer had arranged for printing and distribution of Address to the People concerning parliamentary reform, written by George Mealmaker. For this, Palmer was tried for seditious practices on 12 September 1793, convicted, and sentenced to seven years transportation.

Palmer left in the Surprize along with the Scottish Martyrs, Thomas Muir, William Skirving and Maurice Margarot in April 1794. Whilst serving his seven years of exile in Sydney Palmer did not suffer the usual convist restraint and engaged in several business enterprises, including shipbuilding.

After Palmer's sentence expired, he bought a Spanish ship along with two others and headed for England. However the ship was declared unseaworthy in Guam where Palmer later died.

See also

References

  1. ^ Palmer, Thomas Fyshe in Venn, J. & J. A., Alumni Cantabrigienses, Cambridge University Press, 10 vols, 1922–1958.
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