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Right Rev. Thomas Galberry, O.S.A.
Denomination Roman Catholic Church
Senior posting
See Hartford
Title Bishop of Hartford
Period in office March 19, 1876—October 10, 1878
Consecration March 19, 1876
Predecessor Francis Patrick McFarland
Successor Lawrence Stephen McMahon
Religious career
Priestly ordination December 20, 1856
Personal
Date of birth May 28, 1833(1833-05-28)
Place of birth Naas, County Kildare, Ireland
Date of death October 10, 1878 (aged 45)
Place of death New York, New York, United States

Thomas Galberry O.S.A. (May 28, 1833 – October 10, 1878) was an Irish Augustinian friar and the fourth Bishop of Hartford, Connecticut, serving from 1876 until his death in 1878.

Biography

Thomas Galberry was born in Naas, County Kildare, to Thomas and Margaret (née White) Galberry.[1] In 1836 he and his family moved to the United States, where they settled in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.[1] He studied the classics at Villanova College from 1847 to 1851, and entered the novitiate of theOrder of St. Augustine, more commonly known as the Augustinians, in January 1852. After making his profession on January 4, 1853, he remained at Villanova for three more years, studying theology, Scripture and oratory and serving as a professor and disciplinarian.[1] Galberry was ordained to the priesthood by Bishop John Neumann on December 20, 1856.[2]

He then served as a professor at Villanova College until 1858, when he became pastor of the Augustinian mission at St. Denis Church in Havertown.[1] In January 1860 he was transferred to the mission at Lansingburgh, New York, where Galberry tore down the dilapidated St. John's Church in 1864 and built the new St. Augustine's for $33,500.[1] He also introduced the Sisters of St. Joseph and founded a convent for them; broke ground for a new cemetery; and established numerous confraternities.[1] He was named by the Superior Generall as Commissary (chief superior) of the Augustinian missions in the United States (known as the Commissariat of Our Lady of Good Counsel) on November 30, 1866.[1] In addition to his duties as Commissary, Galberry was made pastor of Lawrence, Massachusetts, in February 1870 and later completed St. Mary's Church.[1]

He served as President of Villanova College from 1872 to 1876, during which time he erected the center and west wings of the college building and reorganized the course of studies.[3] When the Our Lady of Good Counsel Comissariat was formed into the Province of St. Thomas of Villanova in 1874, Galberry was elected Provincial Superior on September 14 of that year.[1]

On March 15, 1875, he was appointed the fourth Bishop of Hartford, Connecticut, by Pope Pius IX.[1] Unwilling to abandon the consecrated life, he sent the Rome his declination of the appointment on the following April 19, but Rome did not accept and required him to obey on February 17, 1876.[2] Galberry received his episcopal consecration on the following March 19 from Archbishop John Joseph Williams, with Bishops Patrick Thomas O'Reilly and Edgar Philip Prindle Wadhams serving as co-consecrators, at St. Peter's Church in Hartford.[2] He later designated St. Peter's to serve temporarily as his pro-cathedral while St. Joseph's Cathedral was under construction.[4] He later laid the cornerstone for St. Joseph's in April 1877.[5]

After returning from an ad limina visit in 1876, Galberry's health began to fail and, seeking rest, he set out for Villanova College in 1878. While traveling through New York, he was stricken with a haemorrhage and taken to Grand Union Hotel, where he died a few hours later at age 45.[4]

References

Preceded by
Francis Patrick McFarland
Bishop of Hartford
1876–1878
Succeeded by
Lawrence Stephen McMahon
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