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Thomas Henry Carter


In office
March 4, 1895 – March 3, 1901
March 4, 1905 – March 3, 1911
Preceded by Thomas C. Power
Paris Gibson
Succeeded by William A. Clark
Henry L. Myers

Born October 30, 1854(1854-10-30)
Portsmouth, Ohio, USA
Died September 17, 1911 (aged 56)
Washington, D.C., USA
Political party Republican
Profession Politician, Lawyer, Farmer, Teacher

Thomas Henry Carter (October 30, 1854 – September 17, 1911) was a delegate, a United States Representative, and a U.S. Senator from Montana.

Early life

Carter was born near Portsmouth, Ohio, and later his family moved to Pana, Illinois. Carter attended the common schools in Illinois. He engaged in farming, school teaching, and railroading; at the same time studied law and was admitted to the bar. In 1882, he moved from Burlington, Iowa, to Helena, Montana. In Montana he was elected as a Republican Delegate to the Fifty-first Congress and served from March 4, 1889, to November 7, 1889, when the Territory was admitted as a State into the Union; elected as its first Representative and served from November 8, 1889, to March 3, 1891.

Career in Government

He served as chairman of the Committee on Mines and Mining (Fifty-first Congress). He was an unsuccessful candidate in 1890 for reelection; Commissioner of the General Land Office 1891-1892, when he was elected chairman of the Republican National Committee.

He was elected as a Republican to the United States Senate and served from March 4, 1895, until March 3, 1901. As a Senator he was chairman of the Committee on Relations with Canada (Fifty-fourth Congress), the Committee on the Census (Fifty-fifth and Fifty-sixth Congresses). President William McKinley appointed him a member of the board of commissioners of the Louisiana Purchase Exposition and served as its president; again elected as a Republican to the United States Senate and served from March 4, 1905, to March 3, 1911. He was not a candidate for reelection. He died in Washington, D.C., September 17, 1911. Carter County, Montana is named in his honor.

References

United States House of Representatives
Preceded by
Joseph K. Toole
Delegate to the U.S. House of Representatives
from Montana Territory's At-large congressional district

March 4, 1889 – November 7, 1889
Succeeded by
Montana statehood
Preceded by
Montana statehood
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Montana's At-large congressional district

November 8, 1889 – March 3, 1891
Succeeded by
William W. Dixon
United States Senate
Preceded by
Thomas C. Power
United States Senator (Class 2) from Montana
March 4, 1895 – March 3, 1901
Served alongside: Lee Mantle, William A. Clark
Succeeded by
William A. Clark
Preceded by
Paris Gibson
United States Senator (Class 1) from Montana
March 4, 1905 – March 3, 1911
Served alongside: William A. Clark, Joseph M. Dixon
Succeeded by
Henry L. Myers
Party political offices
Preceded by
James S. Clarkson
Chairman of the Republican National Committee
1892 – 1896
Succeeded by
Mark Hanna
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Thomas Henry Carter

In office
March 4, 1895 – March 3, 1901
March 4, 1905 – March 3, 1911
Preceded by Thomas C. Power
Paris Gibson
Succeeded by William A. Clark
Henry L. Myers

Born October 30, 1854(1854-10-30)
Portsmouth, Ohio, USA
Died September 17, 1911 (aged 56)
Washington, D.C., USA
Political party Republican
Profession Politician, Lawyer, Farmer, Teacher

Thomas Henry Carter (October 30, 1854 – September 17, 1911) was a delegate, a United States Representative, and a U.S. Senator from Montana.

Early life

Carter was born near Portsmouth, Ohio, and later his family moved to Pana, Illinois. Carter attended the common schools in Illinois. He engaged in farming, school teaching, and railroading; at the same time studied law and was admitted to the bar. In 1882, he moved from Burlington, Iowa, to Helena, Montana. In Montana he was elected as a Republican Delegate to the Fifty-first Congress and served from March 4, 1889, to November 7, 1889, when the Territory was admitted as a State into the Union; elected as its first Representative and served from November 8, 1889, to March 3, 1891.

Career in Government

He served as chairman of the Committee on Mines and Mining (Fifty-first Congress). He was an unsuccessful candidate in 1890 for reelection; Commissioner of the General Land Office 1891-1892, when he was elected chairman of the Republican National Committee.

He was elected as a Republican to the United States Senate and served from March 4, 1895, until March 3, 1901. As a Senator he was chairman of the Committee on Relations with Canada (Fifty-fourth Congress), the Committee on the Census (Fifty-fifth and Fifty-sixth Congresses). President William McKinley appointed him a member of the board of commissioners of the Louisiana Purchase Exposition and served as its president; again elected as a Republican to the United States Senate and served from March 4, 1905, to March 3, 1911. He was not a candidate for reelection. He died in Washington, D.C., September 17, 1911. Carter County, Montana is named in his honor.

References

United States House of Representatives
Preceded by
Joseph K. Toole
Delegate to the U.S. House of Representatives
from Montana Territory's At-large congressional district

March 4, 1889 – November 7, 1889
Succeeded by
Montana statehood
Preceded by
Montana statehood
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Montana's At-large congressional district

November 8, 1889 – March 3, 1891
Succeeded by
William W. Dixon
United States Senate
Preceded by
Thomas C. Power
United States Senator (Class 2) from Montana
March 4, 1895 – March 3, 1901
Served alongside: Lee Mantle, William A. Clark
Succeeded by
William A. Clark
Preceded by
Paris Gibson
United States Senator (Class 1) from Montana
March 4, 1905 – March 3, 1911
Served alongside: William A. Clark, Joseph M. Dixon
Succeeded by
Henry L. Myers
Party political offices
Preceded by
James S. Clarkson
Chairman of the Republican National Committee
1892 – 1896
Succeeded by
Mark Hanna

Template:Otherpeople Template:Infobox Senator

Thomas Henry Carter (October 30, 1854September 17, 1911) was a delegate, a United States Representative, and a U.S. Senator from Montana.

Early life

Carter was born near Portsmouth, Ohio, and later his family moved to Pana, Illinois. Carter attended the common schools in Illinois. He engaged in farming, school teaching, and railroading; at the same time studied law and was admitted to the bar. In 1882, he moved from Burlington, Iowa, to Helena, Montana. In Montana he was elected as a Republican Delegate to the Fifty-first Congress and served from March 4, 1889, to November 7, 1889, when the Territory was admitted as a State into the Union; elected as its first Representative and served from November 8, 1889, to March 3, 1891.

Career in Government

He served as chairman of the Committee on Mines and Mining (Fifty-first Congress). He was an unsuccessful candidate in 1890 for reelection; Commissioner of the General Land Office 1891-1892, when he was elected chairman of the Republican National Committee.

He was elected as a Republican to the United States Senate and served from March 4, 1895, until March 3, 1901. As a Senator he was chairman of the Committee on Relations with Canada (Fifty-fourth Congress), the Committee on the Census (Fifty-fifth and Fifty-sixth Congresses). President William McKinley appointed him a member of the board of commissioners of the Louisiana Purchase Exposition and served as its president; again elected as a Republican to the United States Senate and served from March 4, 1905, to March 3, 1911. He was not a candidate for reelection. He died in Washington, D.C., September 17, 1911. Carter County, Montana is named in his honor.

References

Template:Start box |- ! colspan="3" style="background: #cccccc" | United States House of Representatives |- style="text-align:center;" |width="30%" align="center" rowspan="1"|Preceded by
Joseph K. Toole |width="40%" style="text-align: center;" rowspan="1"|Delegate to the U.S. House of Representatives
from Montana Territory's At-large congressional district

March 4, 1889November 7, 1889 |width="30%" align="center" rowspan="1"| Succeeded by
Montana statehood |- |- style="text-align:center;" |width="30%" align="center" rowspan="1"|Preceded by
Montana statehood |width="40%" style="text-align: center;" rowspan="1"|Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Montana's At-large congressional district

November 8, 1889March 3, 1891 |width="30%" align="center" rowspan="1"| Succeeded by
William W. Dixon |- |- ! colspan="3" style="background: #cccccc" | United States Senate |- style="text-align: center;" |- style="text-align:center;" |width="30%" align="center" rowspan="1"|Preceded by
Thomas C. Power |width="40%" style="text-align: center;" rowspan="1"| United States Senator (Class 2) from Montana
March 4, 1895March 3, 1901
Served alongside: Lee Mantle, William A. Clark |width="30%" align="center" rowspan="1"| Succeeded by
William A. Clark |- |- style="text-align: center;" |- style="text-align:center;" |width="30%" align="center" rowspan="1"|Preceded by
Paris Gibson |width="40%" style="text-align: center;" rowspan="1"| United States Senator (Class 1) from Montana
March 4, 1905March 3, 1911
Served alongside: William A. Clark, Joseph M. Dixon |width="30%" align="center" rowspan="1"| Succeeded by
Henry L. Myers |- |- ! colspan="3" style="background: #FFBF00;" | Party political offices

|- style="text-align: center;" |- style="text-align:center;" |width="30%" align="center" rowspan="1"|Preceded by
James S. Clarkson |width="40%" style="text-align: center;" rowspan="1"|Chairman of the Republican National Committee
1892 – 1896 |width="30%" align="center" rowspan="1"| Succeeded by
Mark Hanna |- Template:End box

Template:RNCchairmen


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