The Full Wiki

More info on Thomas J. Steele

Thomas J. Steele: Wikis

Advertisements
  

Note: Many of our articles have direct quotes from sources you can cite, within the Wikipedia article! This article doesn't yet, but we're working on it! See more info or our list of citable articles.

Encyclopedia

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Thomas Jefferson Steele (March 19, 1853 - March 20, 1920) was a one-term Democratic U.S. Representative from Iowa's 11th congressional district in northwestern Iowa. Steele was the first, and only, Democrat elected to represent the 11th district in its fifty-year history (from 1883 to 1933).

Born near Rushville, Indiana, Steele attended the public schools and Axline Seminary in Fairfax, Iowa. He taught school in central and western Iowa, and studied law in Sheldon, Iowa. He engaged in the hardware business and in banking at Wayne, Nebraska, and served as county clerk of Wayne County, Nebraska from 1884 to 1886. He moved to Sioux City, Iowa, in 1897 and became a livestock commission merchant.

In 1914, Steele upset incumbent Republican Congressman George Cromwell Scott in the race to represent Iowa's 11th congressional district in the Sixty-fourth Congress.[1] Explained one rural newspaper, "the central feature of the Steele campaign was personal solicitation of votes and personal publicity concerning the candidate."[2] By contrast, "Mr. Scott remained in Washington until ten days before the election and put in only one week of campaigning."[3] Steele's win was particularly surprising because it occurred in a year in which Iowa Republicans swept all statewide offices and recaptured all seats in Congress held by Democrats.[3]

Steele ran for re-election in 1916, and Scott again ran against him. This time, Scott campaigned more vigorously, and recaptured the seat from Steele in a very close race. Steele unsuccessfully contested the election. In all, Steele served in Congress from March 4, 1915 to March 3, 1917.

Scott resumed business as commission merchant.

Steele ran again for his former seat in the next election in 1918. Steele won the Democratic nomination, but lost in the general election to William D. Boies.[4]

Steele died in Sioux City on March 20, 1920. He was interred in Graceland Park Cemetery in Sioux City.

References

  1. ^ "Eleventh Iowa Elects a Demo," Waterloo Evening Courier, 1914-11-04 at p. 1.
  2. ^ "Steel [sic] Victory Most Certain," Hospers Tribune, 1914-11-06 at p. 2.
  3. ^ a b "How Eleventh Was Lost," The Cedar Rapids Republican, 1914-11-08 at p. 20 (quoting the Sioux City Journal).
  4. ^ "Iowa Politicians Playing the Game," Sumner Gazette, 1919-12-18, at p. 15.

External links

Advertisements

Thomas Jefferson Steele (March 19, 1853 - March 20, 1920) was a one-term Democratic U.S. Representative from Iowa's 11th congressional district in northwestern Iowa. Steele was the first, and only, Democrat elected to represent the 11th district in its fifty-year history (from 1883 to 1933).

Born near Rushville, Indiana, Steele attended the public schools and Axline Seminary in Fairfax, Iowa. He taught school in central and western Iowa, and studied law in Sheldon, Iowa. He engaged in the hardware business and in banking at Wayne, Nebraska, and served as county clerk of Wayne County, Nebraska from 1884 to 1886. He moved to Sioux City, Iowa, in 1897 and became a livestock commission merchant.

In 1914, Steele upset incumbent Republican Congressman George Cromwell Scott in the race to represent Iowa's 11th congressional district in the Sixty-fourth Congress.[1] Explained one rural newspaper, "the central feature of the Steele campaign was personal solicitation of votes and personal publicity concerning the candidate."[2] By contrast, "Mr. Scott remained in Washington until ten days before the election and put in only one week of campaigning."[3] Steele's win was particularly surprising because it occurred in a year in which Iowa Republicans swept all statewide offices and recaptured all seats in Congress held by Democrats.[3]

Steele ran for re-election in 1916, and Scott again ran against him. This time, Scott campaigned more vigorously, and recaptured the seat from Steele in a very close race. Steele unsuccessfully contested the election. In all, Steele served in Congress from March 4, 1915 to March 3, 1917.

Scott resumed business as commission merchant.

Steele ran again for his former seat in the next election in 1918. Steele won the Democratic nomination, but lost in the general election to William D. Boies.[4]

Steele died in Sioux City on March 20, 1920. He was interred in Graceland Park Cemetery in Sioux City.

References

  1. ^ "Eleventh Iowa Elects a Demo," Waterloo Evening Courier, 1914-11-04 at p. 1.
  2. ^ "Steel [sic] Victory Most Certain," Hospers Tribune, 1914-11-06 at p. 2.
  3. ^ a b "How Eleventh Was Lost," The Cedar Rapids Republican, 1914-11-08 at p. 20 (quoting the Sioux City Journal).
  4. ^ "Iowa Politicians Playing the Game," Sumner Gazette, 1919-12-18, at p. 15.

External links


Advertisements






Got something to say? Make a comment.
Your name
Your email address
Message