The Full Wiki

More info on Three-level diamond interchange

Three-level diamond interchange: Wikis

Advertisements
  
  

Note: Many of our articles have direct quotes from sources you can cite, within the Wikipedia article! This article doesn't yet, but we're working on it! See more info or our list of citable articles.

Encyclopedia

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Three-level diamond diagram

A three-level diamond interchange is a type of highway interchange where through traffic on both main roads is grade-separated from intersections which handle transferring traffic.[1] It is similar in design to a three-level stacked roundabout except for its use of (usually signalled) conventional intersections, and can be thought of as two diamond interchanges fused together.

Contents

Description

In a three-level diamond interchange, the two main roads are on separate levels, and on a third level, usually in the middle, there is a square of one-way roads. The square circulates clockwise where traffic drives on the left, or anticlockwise where it drives on the right. At each corner of the square is the terminal of an exit ramp from one main road and an entrance ramp to the other main road. Traffic transferring from one road to the other to make an overall right turn only passes through one corner of the square, at which point a right turn is made. Transfer traffic making an overall left turn must proceed straight through the first intersection it encounters, turn left at the next, and then proceed straight through a third intersection to enter the other main roadway.

Examples

Three-level diamond interchanges are most common in urban settings where the right-of-way for a new interchange must be kept to a minimum.

Location First Route Second Route Notes
Cedar Rapids, Iowa I-380.svg I-380 Iowa 100.svg IA 100 Collector/distributor roads intersect.
Sioux City, Iowa I-29.svg I-29 US 77.svg US 77
Detroit, Michigan I-75.svg I-75 (Walter P. Chrysler Freeway) M-102.svg M-102 (8-Mile Road) I-75 uses frontage roads.
Detroit, Michigan M-102.svg M-102 (8-Mile Road) M-1.svg M-1 (Woodward Avenue)
Detroit, Michigan M-102.svg M-102 (8-Mile Road) M-10.svg M-10 (John C. Lodge Freeway) Includes flyovers from northbound M-10 to westbound M-102, eastbound M-102 to southbound M-10, and westbound M-102 to northbound M-10. M-10 uses frontage roads.
Jefferson City, Missouri US 50.svgUS 63.svg US 50/US 63 northbound US 54.svgUS 63.svg US 54/US 63 southbound A flyover ramp allows southbound US 63 traffic to join US 50 east, bypassing one intersection.
Asheville, North Carolina I-240.svg I-240 US 70 I-240 Exit 7
Springfield Township, Pennsylvania I-476.svg I-476 US 1.svg US 1
Fairfax County, Virginia Iowa 7100.svg Fairfax County Parkway US 29.svg US 29 The south end of West Ox Road also meets this interchange.
Welch, West Virginia US 52.svg US 52 (King Coal Highway) US 121.svg US 121 (Coalfields Expressway) As of 2008, grading has been completed for interchange but interchange itself has not been constructed.
Wheeling, West Virginia I-470.svg I-470 US 250.svgWV-2.svg US 250/WV 2 Entire interchange is elevated above city streets.
Wauwatosa, Wisconsin US 45.svg US 45 WIS 190.svg WI 190 (Capitol Drive) An access road for the adjacent Harley-Davidson plant is also part of the interchange.

A few examples of this can also be found in Texas; however, the interchanges usually include the frontage roads as well. If the traffic amounts increase the interchange is usually converted into a stack interchange.

References

  1. ^ Indiana Department of Transportation, InterchangesPDF (203 KiB), pages 21 and 22

External links

Advertisements

Advertisements






Got something to say? Make a comment.
Your name
Your email address
Message