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Kanton Thurgau
Flag of Canton of Thurgau.svg Wappen Thurgau matt.svg
Map of Switzerland, location of Thurgau highlighted
Coordinates 47°35′N 9°4′E / 47.583°N 9.067°E / 47.583; 9.067Coordinates: 47°35′N 9°4′E / 47.583°N 9.067°E / 47.583; 9.067
Capital Frauenfeld
Population 238,316 
 - Density 240 /km² (623 /sq mi)
Area  991 km² (383 sq mi)
Highest point 991 m (3,251 ft) - Hohgrat
Lowest point 370 m (1,214 ft) - Thur River at the cantonal border in Neunforn
Joined 1803
Abbreviation TG
Languages German
Executive Regierungsrat (5)
Legislative Grosser Rat (130)
Municipalities 80 municipalities
Districts 8 Bezirke
Website TG.ch

Thurgau (German: About this sound Thurgau , anglicized as Thurgovia) is a northeast canton of Switzerland. The population is 238,316 (2007) of which 47,390 (or 19.9%) are foreigners.[1] The capital is Frauenfeld.

Contents

History

In prehistoric times the lands of the canton were inhabited by people of the Pfyn culture along the lake. During Roman times the canton was part of the province Raetia until in 450 the lands were settled by the Alamanni. It was only in the 8th century that the canton became a political unit similar to what it is known today, as a Gau of the Frankish Empire. At the time, however, the area was not so clearly defined and changed frequently. Overall, the size of the Thurgau was larger, but during the Middle Ages the canton became smaller in size. The dukes of Zähringen and the counts of Kyburg took over much of the land. The town of Zürich was part of the Thurgau until it became reichsunmittelbar in 1218. When the Kyburg dynasty became extinct in 1264 the Habsburgs took over that land. The Swiss confederation allied with ten freed bailiwicks of the former Toggenburg seized the lands of the Thurgau from the Habsburgs in 1460, and it became a subject territory of seven Swiss cantons (Zurich, Lucerne, Uri, Schwyz, Unterwalden, Zug and Glarus).

During the Protestant Reformation in Switzerland, both the Catholic and emerging Reformed parties sought to swing the subject territories, such as the Thurgau, to their side. In 1524, in an incident that resonated across Switzerland, local peasants occupied the cloister of Ittingen in the Thurgau, driving out the monks, destroying documents, and devastating the wine-cellar. Between 1526 and 1531, most of the Thurgau's population adopted the new Reformed faith spreading from Zurich; Zurich's defeat in the War of Kappel (1531) ended Reformed predominance. Instead, the First Peace of Kappel protected both Catholic and Reformed worship, though the provisions of the treaty generally favored the Catholics, who also made up a majority among the seven ruling cantons. Religious tensions over the Thurgau were an important background to the First War of Villmergen (1656), during which Zurich briefly occupied the Thurgau.

In 1798 the land became a canton for the first time as part of the Helvetic Republic. In 1803, as part of the Act of Mediation, the canton of Thurgau became a member of the Swiss confederation. The current cantonal constitution dates from 1987.

Geography

St Margaret's Chapel in Thurgau

To the north the canton is bound by the Lake Constance across which lies Germany and Austria. The river Rhine creates the border in the northwest. To the south lies the canton of St. Gallen; to the west lie the cantons of Zürich and Schaffhausen.

The area of the canton is 991 km2 (382.6 sq mi) and commonly divided into three hill masses. One of these stretches along Lake Constance in the north. Another is further inland between the river Thur and the river Murg. The third one forms the southern border of the canton and merges with the Hörnli mountain in the pre-Alps.

Demographics

The population is mostly German speaking. The population (as of 2000) is split between Protestants (45%) and Roman Catholics (36%).[2]

Political subdivisions

Districts

Districts of Canton Thurgau

Thurgau is divided into eight districts, and each is named after its capital:

Municipalities

There are 80 municipalities in the canton (As of 2009).[3]

Economy

The canton of Thurgau is known for its fine agricultural produce. Particularly, apples, pears, fruits and vegetables are well-known. The many orchards in the canton are mainly used for the production of cider. Wine is produced in the Thur valley.

There is also industry in the canton of Thurgau. The main industries are printing, textiles and handicrafts. Small and middle-sized businesses are important for the cantonal economy. Many of these are concentrated around the capital.

External links

References


1911 encyclopedia

Up to date as of January 14, 2010
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From LoveToKnow 1911

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Wiktionary

Up to date as of January 15, 2010

Definition from Wiktionary, a free dictionary

Contents

English

Proper noun

Thurgau

  1. A canton of Switzerland (its German name).

Synonyms

  • Thurgovia (the anglicised name), the canton of Thurgau, the canton of Thurgovia

Translations

See also


Simple English

Thurgau
[[Image:|170px|none|Map of Switzerland highlighting the Canton of Thurgau]]
Capital Frauenfeld
Population (2003) 228,200 (Ranked 13th)
  - Density 230 /km²
Area Coordinates: 47°35′N 9°4′E 991 km² (Ranked 12th)
Highest point Hohgrat 991 m
Joined 1803
Abbreviation TG
Languages German
Executive Regierungsrat (5)
Legislative Grosser Rat (130)
Municipalities 80 municipalities
Districts 8 Bezirke
Website www.TG.ch
[[Image:|250px|none|Map of the Canton of Thurgau]]

Thurgau is a northeast canton of Switzerland. The population is 228,200 (2003). The capital is Frauenfeld.

Contents

Geography

To the north of Thurgau is the Lake Constance, across which is Germany and Austria. The river Rhine makes the border in the northwest. To the south is the Canton of St. Gallen; to the west are the cantons of Zürich and Schaffhausen.

The area of the canton is 991 km² and is usually divided into three hilly areas. One of these is along Lake Constance to the north. Another is inland between the rivers Thur and Murg. The third one makes the southern border of the canton and comes together with the Hörnli mountain in the pre-Alps.

History

In prehistoric times the lands of the canton were inhabited by people of the Pfyn culture along the lake. During Roman times the canton was part of the province Raetia until in 450 the lands were settled by the Alamanni. It was only in the 8th century that the canton became a political unit similar to what it is known today, as a Gau of the Frankish Empire. At the time, however, the area was not so clearly defined and changed frequently. Overall, the size of the Thurgau was larger, but during the Middle Ages the canton became smaller in size. The dukes of Zähringen and the counts of Kyburg took over much of the land. The town of Zürich was part of the Thurgau until it became reichsunmittelbar in 1218. When the Kyburg dynasty became extinct in 1264 the Habsburgs took over that land. The Swiss confederation allied with ten freed bailiwicks of the former Toggenburg seized the lands of the Thurgau from the Habsburgs in 1460, and it became subject territory of Zürich.

In 1798 the land became a canton for the first time as part of the Helvetic Republic. In 1803 the canton of Thurgau became a member of the Swiss confederation. The current cantonal constitution dates from 1987.

Economy

The canton of Thurgau is known for the farm produce such as apples, pears, and other fruits and vegetables. The many orchards in the canton are used for the making of cider. Wine is produced in the Thur valley.

There is also industry in the canton of Thurgau. The main industries are printing, clothing and arts and crafts. Small and middle-sized businesses are important for the economy. Many of these are concentrated around the capital.

Demographics

The population is mostly German speaking. Most of the population are Protestants with the rest being Roman Catholics.

Districts

The Canton of Thurgau is divided into eight districts, and each is named after its capital:

Municipalities

There are 80 municipalities in the canton (as of April 2004):

Other websites

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