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Tim Wallach
Third baseman
Born: September 14, 1957 (1957-09-14) (age 52)
Huntington Park, California
Batted: Right Threw: Right 
MLB debut
September 6, 1980 for the Montreal Expos
Last MLB appearance
September 29, 1996 for the Los Angeles Dodgers
Career statistics
Batting average     .257
Home runs     260
Runs batted in     1,125
Teams
Career highlights and awards

Timothy Charles Wallach (born September 14, 1957 in Huntington Park, California), nicknamed "Eli" in reference to actor Eli Wallach, is a former third baseman in Major League Baseball who played from 1980 to 1996 for the Montreal Expos, Los Angeles Dodgers, and California Angels. He won three Gold Glove awards for defensive excellence and 2 Silver Slugger awards for offensive excellence. He was named to 5 All-star teams. Wallach spent the majority of his career with the Expos, forming a potent lineup with teammates Tim Raines, Gary Carter, and Andre Dawson. Bill James has referred to Wallach as a "poor man's Brooks Robinson," largely because of his defensive skills.[1]

In 1979, while playing at Cal State Fullerton, Wallach won the award for best college player, the Golden Spikes Award.

In 8099 career at-bats, Wallach had 2085 hits. He batted .257 with 260 home runs and 1125 RBI. Wallach had 908 career runs scored.

In 2004 and 2005, Wallach was the hitting coach of the Los Angeles Dodgers. When Grady Little became the manager and replaced Jim Tracy in December, 2005, Wallach remained hitting coach until he was replaced by Eddie Murray. On January 12, 2009, he was named the manager for the Triple-A Albuquerque Isotopes in the Dodgers organization.[2] He led the Isotopes into the playoffs with a franchise record 80 wins and was named as Pacific Coast League Manager of the Year.[3]

See also

References

  1. ^ Bill, James (2001). The new Bill James Historical Baseball Abstract. The Free Press / Simon & Shuster.  
  2. ^ "Isotopes name new manager". kob.com. 2009-01-12. http://kob.com/article/stories/S740398.shtml?cat=500. Retrieved 2009-01-12.  
  3. ^ Tim Wallach Named PCL Manager of the Year

External links

Awards and achievements
Preceded by
Dale Murphy
National League Player of the Month
May, 1982
Succeeded by
Al Oliver
Preceded by
Andrés Galarraga
NL Comeback Player of the Year
1994
Succeeded by
Ron Gant
Sporting positions
Preceded by
George Hendrick
Los Angeles Dodgers Hitting Coach
2004-2005
Succeeded by
Eddie Murray
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Tim Wallach
File:Tim Wallach 2010
Wallach as manager of the Albuquerque Isotopes, Triple-A affiliates of the Dodgers, in
  1. REDIRECT Template:Baseball Year.
Third baseman
Born: September 14, 1957 (1957-09-14) (age 53)
Huntington Park, California
Batted: Right Threw: Right 
MLB debut
September 6, 1980 for the Montreal Expos
Last MLB appearance
September 29, 1996 for the Los Angeles Dodgers
Career statistics
Batting average    .257
Home runs    260
Runs batted in    1,125
Teams
  1. REDIRECT Template:Baseball Year–
  2. REDIRECT Template:Baseball Year)
  1. REDIRECT Template:Baseball Year–
  2. REDIRECT Template:Baseball Year)
  1. REDIRECT Template:Baseball Year)
  1. REDIRECT Template:Baseball Year)
Career highlights and awards

Timothy Charles Wallach (born September 14, 1957 in Huntington Park, California), nicknamed "Eli" in reference to actor Eli Wallach, is a former third baseman in Major League Baseball who played from 1980 to 1996 for the Montreal Expos, Los Angeles Dodgers, and California Angels. He won three Gold Glove awards for defensive excellence and 2 Silver Slugger awards for offensive excellence. He was named to 5 All-star teams. Wallach spent the majority of his career with the Expos, forming a potent lineup with teammates Tim Raines, Gary Carter, and Andre Dawson. Bill James has referred to Wallach as a "poor man's Brooks Robinson," largely because of his defensive skills.[1]

In 1979, while playing at Cal State Fullerton, Wallach won the award for best college player, the Golden Spikes Award.

In 8099 career at-bats, Wallach had 2085 hits. He batted .257 with 260 home runs and 1125 RBI. Wallach had 908 career runs scored.

In 2004 and 2005, Wallach was the hitting coach of the Los Angeles Dodgers. When Grady Little became the manager and replaced Jim Tracy in December, 2005, Wallach remained hitting coach until he was replaced by Eddie Murray. On January 12,

  1. REDIRECT Template:Baseball Year, he was named the manager for the Triple-A Albuquerque Isotopes in the Dodgers organization.[2] He led the Isotopes into the playoffs with a franchise record 80 wins and was named as Pacific Coast League Manager of the Year.[3]

See also

References

  1. ^ Bill, James (2001). The new Bill James Historical Baseball Abstract. The Free Press / Simon & Shuster. 
  2. ^ "Isotopes name new manager". kob.com. 2009-01-12. http://kob.com/article/stories/S740398.shtml?cat=500. Retrieved 2009-01-12. 
  3. ^ Tim Wallach Named PCL Manager of the Year

External links

Awards and achievements
Preceded by
Dale Murphy
National League Player of the Month
May, 1982
Succeeded by
Al Oliver
Preceded by
Andrés Galarraga
NL Comeback Player of the Year
1994
Succeeded by
Ron Gant
Sporting positions
Preceded by
George Hendrick
Los Angeles Dodgers Hitting Coach
2004-2005
Succeeded by
Eddie Murray



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