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There are eleven time zones in Russia from UTC+02 to UTC+12, only France if including overseas territories has more, namely twelve.

Map of Russia - Time Zones.svg

The time zones are as follows:

Time Zone Name Zone Abbreviations
(Standard/Summer)
Time difference Area covered
Kaliningrad Time USZ1/USZ1S UTC+02 Kaliningrad Oblast
Moscow Time MSK/MSD UTC+03 Most of European Russia
Samara Time SAMT/SAMST UTC+04 Samara Oblast and Udmurtia
Yekaterinburg Time YEKT/YEKST UTC+05 Bashkortostan, Chelyabinsk Oblast, Khantia-Mansia, Kurgan Oblast, Orenburg Oblast, Perm Krai, Sverdlovsk Oblast, Tyumen Oblast, and Yamalia
Omsk Time OMST/OMSST UTC+06 Altai Krai, Altai Republic, Novosibirsk Oblast, Omsk Oblast and Tomsk Oblast
Krasnoyarsk Time KRAT/KRAST UTC+07 Kemerovo Oblast, Khakassia, Krasnoyarsk Krai and Tuva
Irkutsk Time IRKT/IRKST UTC+08 Buryatia and Irkutsk Oblast
Yakutsk Time YAKT/YAKST UTC+09 Amur Oblast, western Sakha Republic and Zabaykalsky Krai
Vladivostok Time VLAT/VLAST UTC+10 The Jewish Autonomous Oblast, Khabarovsk Krai, Primorsky Krai, central Sakha Republic and Sakhalin Island
Magadan Time MAGT/MAGST UTC+11 Magadan Oblast, eastern Sakha and the Kuril Islands
Kamchatka Time PETT/PETST UTC+12 Chukotka and Kamchatka Krai

The only federal subjects to be in more than one time zone are the Sakha Republic, which is separated into areas which observe the Yakutsk, Vladivostok and Magadan time zones, and Sakhalin Oblast, which is in the Vladivostok (island Sakhalin) and Magadan time zones (Kuril Islands).

Tz database

The list below shows the 16 zones for Russia as defined in the zone file of the tz database. The tz database identifies regions that had the same time offset rules since 1970.

Two subdivisions of Russia are contain more than one tz zone.

Sakha Republic is divided into three:

  • west
  • central
  • east

Sakhalin Oblast is divided into two:

coordinates TZ comments UTC offset (As of 2010) Note
+5443+02030 Europe/Kaliningrad Moscow-01 - Kaliningrad UTC+02 Kaliningrad Oblast
+5545+03735 Europe/Moscow Moscow+00 - west Russia UTC+03
+4844+04425 Europe/Volgograd Moscow+00 - Caspian Sea UTC+03
+5312+05009 Europe/Samara Moscow+01 - Samara, Udmurtia UTC+04 Samara Oblast and Udmurtia
+5651+06036 Asia/Yekaterinburg Moscow+01 - Samara, Udmurtia UTC+05 Bashkortostan, Chelyabinsk Oblast, Khantia-Mansia, Kurgan Oblast, Orenburg Oblast, Perm Krai, Sverdlovsk Oblast, Tyumen Oblast, and Yamalia
+5500+07324 Asia/Omsk Moscow+03 - west Siberia UTC+06 Altai Krai, Altai Republic, Omsk Oblast
+5502+08255 Asia/Novosibirsk Moscow+03 - Novosibirsk UTC+06 Novosibirsk Oblast, Tomsk Oblast
+5345+08707 Asia/Novokuznetsk Moscow+03 - Novokuznetsk UTC+06 2010-03-28 Kemerovo Oblast splits from Krasnoyarsk [1]
+5601+09250 Asia/Krasnoyarsk Moscow+04 - Yenisei River UTC+07 Khakassia, Krasnoyarsk Krai, Tuva Republic
+5216+10420 Asia/Irkutsk Moscow+05 - Lake Baikal UTC+08 Buryatia, Irkutsk Oblast
+6200+12940 Asia/Yakutsk Moscow+06 - Lena River UTC+09
+4310+13156 Asia/Vladivostok Moscow+07 - Amur River UTC+10 Jewish Autonomous Oblast, Khabarovsk Krai, Primorsky Krai, central Sakha Republic
+4658+14242 Asia/Sakhalin Moscow+07 - Sakhalin Island UTC+10
+5934+15048 Asia/Magadan Moscow+08 - Magadan UTC+11
+5301+15839 Asia/Kamchatka Moscow+09 - Kamchatka UTC+12
+6445+17729 Asia/Anadyr Moscow+10 - Bering Sea UTC+12 Chukotka Autonomous Okrug

Daylight saving time

Russia's time zones change over to daylight saving time on dates in accordance with European Summer Time; moving clocks forward one hour at 02:00 local winter time on the last Sunday in March and back one hour at 03:00 local daylight time on the last Sunday in October. Russia does not follow the 01:00 UTC changeover rule for daylight saving.

Developments

In November 2009, President of Russia Dmitry Medvedev proposed reducing the number of time zones spanning the country,[1] as well as the abolition of daylight saving time.

See also

Notes

References

External links

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Contents

There are nine time zones in Russia, from UTC+02 to UTC+11.

The time zones are as follows:

Time Zone Name Zone Abbreviations
(Standard/Summer)
Time difference
(Standard)
Area covered
Kaliningrad Time USZ1/USZ1S UTC+02 Kaliningrad Oblast
Moscow Time MSK/MSD UTC+03 Most of European Russia
Yekaterinburg Time YEKT/YEKST UTC+05 Bashkortostan, Chelyabinsk Oblast, Khantia-Mansia, Kurgan Oblast, Orenburg Oblast, Perm Krai, Sverdlovsk Oblast, Tyumen Oblast, and Yamalia
Omsk Time OMST/OMSST UTC+06 Altai Krai, Altai Republic, Novosibirsk Oblast, Kemerovo Oblast, Omsk Oblast and Tomsk Oblast
Krasnoyarsk Time KRAT/KRAST UTC+07 Khakassia, Krasnoyarsk Krai and Tuva
Irkutsk Time IRKT/IRKST UTC+08 Buryatia and Irkutsk Oblast
Yakutsk Time YAKT/YAKST UTC+09 Amur Oblast, western Sakha Republic and Zabaykalsky Krai
Vladivostok Time VLAT/VLAST UTC+10 The Jewish Autonomous Oblast, Khabarovsk Krai, Primorsky Krai, central Sakha Republic and Sakhalin Island
Magadan Time MAGT/MAGST UTC+11 Magadan Oblast, eastern Sakha Republic, Kuril Islands, Chukotka and Kamchatka Krai

The only federal subjects to be in more than one time zone are the Sakha Republic, which is separated into areas which observe the Yakutsk, Vladivostok and Magadan time zones, and Sakhalin Oblast, which is in the Vladivostok (island Sakhalin) and Magadan time zones (Kuril Islands).

Tz database

The list below shows the 16 zones for Russia as defined in the zone file of the tz database. The tz database identifies regions that had the same time offset rules since 1970.

Two federal subjects are contained in more than one tz zone.

The Sakha Republic is divided into three:

  • west
  • central
  • east

Sakhalin Oblast is divided into two:

coordinates TZ comments UTC offset
(Standard)
UTC offset
DST
Areas Covered and Time Zone History
+5443+02030 Europe/Kaliningrad Moscow-01 - Kaliningrad UTC+02 UTC+03 Kaliningrad Oblast. Used Moscow Time until 1992.
+5545+03735 Europe/Moscow Moscow+00 - west Russia UTC+03 UTC+04 Most of European Russia (see list below)
+4844+04425 Europe/Volgograd Moscow+00 - Caspian Sea UTC+03 UTC+04 Kirov Oblast, Saratov Oblast, Volgograd Oblast and Astrakhan Oblast. Changed from UTC+04 to UTC+03 on March 29, 1992.
+5312+05009 Europe/Samara Moscow+01 - Samara, Udmurtia UTC+03 UTC+04 Samara Oblast and Udmurtia. Changed from UTC+04 to UTC+03 on March 28, 2010.
+5651+06036 Asia/Yekaterinburg Moscow+02 - Urals UTC+05 UTC+06 Bashkortostan, Chelyabinsk Oblast, Khantia-Mansia, Kurgan Oblast, Orenburg Oblast, Perm Krai, Sverdlovsk Oblast, Tyumen Oblast, and Yamalia
+5500+07324 Asia/Omsk Moscow+03 - west Siberia UTC+06 UTC+07 Altai Krai, Altai Republic changed from UTC+07 to UTC+06 on May 28, 1995, Omsk Oblast.
+5502+08255 Asia/Novosibirsk Moscow+03 - Novosibirsk UTC+06 UTC+07 Novosibirsk Oblast changed from UTC+07 to UTC+06 on May 23, 1993, Tomsk Oblast changed from UTC+07 to UTC+06 on May 1, 2002.
+5345+08707 Asia/Novokuznetsk Moscow+03 - Novokuznetsk UTC+06 UTC+07 Kemerovo Oblast. Changed from Krasnoyarsk Time to Novosibirsk Time on March 28, 2010 [1]
+5601+09250 Asia/Krasnoyarsk Moscow+04 - Yenisei River UTC+07 UTC+08 Khakassia, Krasnoyarsk Krai, Tuva Republic
+5216+10420 Asia/Irkutsk Moscow+05 - Lake Baikal UTC+08 UTC+09 Buryatia, Irkutsk Oblast
+6200+12940 Asia/Yakutsk Moscow+06 - Lena River UTC+09 UTC+10 Amur Oblast, Zabaykalsky Krai, western Sakha Republic
+4310+13156 Asia/Vladivostok Moscow+07 - Amur River UTC+10 UTC+11 Jewish Autonomous Oblast, Khabarovsk Krai, Primorsky Krai, central Sakha Republic
+4658+14242 Asia/Sakhalin Moscow+07 - Sakhalin Island UTC+10 UTC+11 Sakhalin Island. Changed from UTC+11 to UTC+10 on March 30, 1997.
+5934+15048 Asia/Magadan Moscow+08 - Magadan UTC+11 UTC+12 Magadan Oblast, Kuril Islands
+5301+15839 Asia/Kamchatka Moscow+09 - Kamchatka UTC+11 UTC+12 Kamchatka Krai. Changed from UTC+12 to UTC+11 on March 28, 2010.
+6445+17729 Asia/Anadyr Moscow+10 - Bering Sea UTC+11 UTC+12 Chukotka Autonomous Okrug. Changed from UTC+13 to UTC+12 on April 1, 1982, then from UTC+12 to UTC+11 on March 28, 2010.

The following federal subjects have remained on Moscow Time since 1970: Republic of Adygea, Arkhangelsk Oblast, Belgorod Oblast, Bryansk Oblast, Chechen Republic, Chuvash Republic, Republic of Dagestan, Republic of Ingushetia, Ivanovo Oblast, Kabardino-Balkar Republic, Republic of Kalmykia, Kaluga Oblast, Karachay-Cherkess Republic, Republic of Karelia, Komi Republic, Kostroma Oblast, Krasnodar Krai, Kursk Oblast, Leningrad Oblast, Lipetsk Oblast, Mari El Republic, Republic of Mordovia, federal city of Moscow, Murmansk Oblast, Nenets Autonomous Okrug, Nizhny Novgorod Oblast, Republic of North Ossetia-Alania, Novgorod Oblast, Oryol Oblast, Penza Oblast, Pskov Oblast, Rostov Oblast, Ryazan Oblast, Smolensk Oblast, federal city of Saint Petersburg, Stavropol Krai, Tambov Oblast, Republic of Tatarstan, Tula Oblast, Tver Oblast, Ulyanovsk Oblast, Vladimir Oblast, Vologda Oblast, Voronezh Oblast, and Yaroslavl Oblast.

Daylight saving time

Russia's time zones change over to daylight saving time on dates in accordance with European Summer Time; moving clocks forward one hour at 02:00 local winter time on the last Sunday in March and back one hour at 03:00 local daylight time on the last Sunday in October. Russia does not follow the 01:00 UTC changeover rule for daylight saving.

Daylight saving time in Russia was originally introduced on July 1, 1917 by a decree of the Russian Provisional Government. However, it was abandoned by a Decree of the Soviet government five months later.

Daylight saving time was reintroduced in the USSR on April 1, 1981, by a decision of the Council of Ministers of the USSR. Daylight saving time began on the 1st of April and ended on the 1st of October each year, until mid-1984, when the USSR began following European daylight saving time rules. The practice then continued after the Soviet collapse.

Developments

File:Map of Russia - Time Zones (2009).svg
Time zones in Russia from 2002–10


In Imperial Russia, most of the nation observed solar time. During the late 19th Century, Moscow Mean Time was introduced, originally at UTC+02:30. However, when the Soviet Union was created, Moscow Time became UTC+02 and the various other time zones were introduced throughout Russia and the rest of the USSR. On June 21, 1930, the Soviet Union advanced all clocks by one hour, effectively making the nation run on daylight saving time all year. Russia and most republics in the Soviet Union turned their clocks back one hour on Mar 31, 1991, but Russia reversed this the following year.

In 1993, Novosibirsk Oblast changed its time zone from MSK+4 to MSK+3.

In 1995, Altai Krai changed its time zone from MSK+4 to MSK+3.

In 2002, Tomsk Oblast changed its time zone from MSK+4 to MSK+3.

In November 2009, President of Russia Dmitry Medvedev proposed reducing the number of time zones spanning the country,[1] as well as the abolition of daylight saving time.

On March 28, 2010, the following changes were introduced, which, in particular, led to abolition of two of the eleven time zones.

See also

References

  1. ^ "Russian president Dmitry Medvedev wants to cut 11 time zones.". 15 November 2009. http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/europe/8357630.stm. 
  2. ^ Правительство Российской Федерации. Постановление №166 от 17 марта 2010 г. «О применении на территории Удмуртской Республики времени второго часового пояса». Опубликован: "Российская Газета", №58, 22 марта 2010 г. (Government of the Russian Federation. Resolution #166 of March 17, 2010 On Using the Time of the Second Time Zone on the Territory of the Udmurt Republic. ).
  3. ^ Правительство Российской Федерации. Постановление №170 от 19 марта 2010 г. «О применении на территории Самарской области времени второго часового пояса». Опубликован: "Российская Газета", №58, 22 марта 2010 г. (Government of the Russian Federation. Resolution #170 of March 19, 2010 On Using the Time of the Second Time Zone on the Territory of Samara Oblast. ).
  4. ^ Правительство Российской Федерации. Постановление №740 от 14 сентября 2009 г. «О применении на территории Кемеровской области времени пятого часового пояса». (Government of the Russian Federation. Resolution #740 of September 14, 2009 On Using the Time of the Fifth Time Zone on the Territory of Kemerovo Oblast. ).
  5. ^ Правительство Российской Федерации. Постановление №171 от 19 марта 2010 г. «О применении на территории Камчатского края и Чукотского автономного округа времени десятого часового пояса». Опубликован: "Российская Газета", №58, 22 марта 2010 г. (Government of the Russian Federation. Resolution #171 of March 19, 2010 On Using the Time of the Tenth Time Zone on the Territory of Kamchatka Krai and Chukotka Autonomous Okrug. ).

External links


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