The Full Wiki

Timeline of the 1997 Atlantic hurricane season: Wikis

Advertisements
  

Note: Many of our articles have direct quotes from sources you can cite, within the Wikipedia article! This article doesn't yet, but we're working on it! See more info or our list of citable articles.

Encyclopedia

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Track map of all tropical cyclones during the 1997 Atlantic hurricane season

The 1997 Atlantic hurricane season was an inactive season, during which only nine tropical cyclones formed. The season officially began on June 1, 1997 and ended November 30, 1997, dates which conventionally limit the period of each year when tropical cyclones tend to form in the Atlantic. This timeline documents tropical cyclone formations, strengthening, weakening, landfalls, extratropical transitions, as well as dissipations during the season. The timeline also includes information which was not operationally released, meaning that information from post-storm reviews by the National Hurricane Center, such as information on a storm that was not operationally warned upon. This season produced 8 tropical depressions, of which 7 became named storms; three attained hurricane status, of which one became a major hurricane, a storm that ranks as a Category 3 or higher on the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Scale.

Contents

Timeline of events

Advertisements

June

The track of the unnumbered subtropical storm. The storm took a path that paralleled the eastern United States without making landfall.
Track map of the unnumbered subtropical storm
June 1
  • The 1997 Atlantic hurricane season officially begins.
  • 0600 UTC (2:00 a.m. EDT) – A subtropical depression forms north of the Bahamas. Operationally, this storm was treated as a frontal low.[1]
  • 1200 UTC (8:00 a.m. EDT) – The subtropical depression strengthens into a subtropical storm.[1]
  • 1800 UTC (2:00 p.m. EDT) – The subtropical storm reaches its peak intensity of 50 mph (85 km/h).[1]
June 2
  • 1800 UTC (2:00 p.m. EDT) – The subtropical storm becomes extratropical.[1]
June 30
  • 1200 UTC (8:00 a.m. EDT) – Tropical Depression One forms just of the coast of South Carolina.[2]

July

Track map of Tropical Storm Ana. The storm formed south of the Carolinas and took northeastern path, bringing it away from land.
Track map of Tropical Storm Ana
July 1
  • 0600 UTC (2:00 a.m. EDT) – Tropical Depression One strengthens into a tropical storm and is named Ana.[2]
  • 1200 UTC (8:00 a.m. EDT) – Tropical Storm Ana reaches its peak intensity of 45 mph (70 km/h).
    [2]
July 3
  • 1800 UTC (2:00 p.m. EDT) – Tropical Storm Ana weakens into a tropical depression.[2]
July 4
Track map of Hurricane Bill. The storm formed far from the eastern United States and accelerated to the northeast, bringing it close to Bermuda.
Track map of Hurricane Bill
July 11
  • 0600 UTC (2:00 a.m. EDT) – Tropical Depression Two forms southeast of North Carolina.[3]
  • 1200 UTC (8:00 a.m. EDT) – Tropical Depression Two strengthens into a tropical storm and is named Bill.[3]
July 12
  • 1200 UTC (8:00 a.m. EDT) – Tropical Storm Bill strengthens into a Category 1 hurricane— the first of the season. Simultaneously, it reaches its peak intensity of 75 mph (120 km/h).[3]
July 13
  • 0000 UTC (8:00 p.m. EDT July 12) – Hurricane Bill weakens into a tropical storm.[3]
  • 0600 UTC (2:00 a.m. EDT) – Tropical Storm Bill is absorbed by a front south of Newfoundland, Canada.[3]
Track map of Tropical Storm Claudette. The storm formed east of the eastern United States and initially headed northward but then re-curved to the east.
Track map of Tropical Storm Claudette
  • 0600 UTC (2:00 a.n. EDT) – Tropical Depression Three forms south-southeast 315 miles (507 km)of Cape Hatteras, North Carolina.[4]
  • 1800 UTC (2:00 p.m. EDT) – Tropical Depression Three strengthens into a tropical storm and is named Claudette. Simultaneously, it reaches its peak intensity of 45 mph (70 km/h).[4]
July 15
  • 1200 UTC (8:00 a.m. EDT) – Tropical Storm Claudette regains its peak intensity of 45 mph (70 km/h).[4]

July 16

  • 0000 UTC (8:00 p.m. EDT July 15) – Tropical Storm Claudette weakens into a tropical depression.[4]
  • 0600 UTC (2:00 a.m. EDT) – Tropical Depression Claudette restrengthens into a tropical storm.[4]
  • 1800 UTC (2:00 p.m. EDT) – Tropical Storm Claudette merges with a cold front.[4]
  • 1200 UTC (8:00 a.m. EDT) – Tropical Depression Four formed about 150 miles (240 km) south of the southwestern Louisiana coastline.[5]

July 17

  • 0600 UTC (2:00 a.m. EDT) – Tropical Depression Five forms while centered about 475 nautical miles (880 km) east of Barbados.[6]
  • 1600 UTC (8:00 a.m. EDT) – Tropical Depression Four strengthens into Tropical Storm Danny.[5]

July 18

  • 0600 UTC (2:00 a.m. EDT) – Tropical Storm Danny strengthens into Hurricane Danny.[5]
  • 0900 UTC (5:00 a.m. EDT) – Hurricane Danny makes landfall on the Mississippi River Delta in Louisiana with winds of 75 mph (120 km/h).[5]

July 19

Hurricane Danny on July 19.
  • 0600 UTC (2:00 a.m. EDT) – Tropical Depression Five degenerates into a tropical wave.[6]
  • 1000 UTC (6:00 a.m. EDT) – Hurricane Danny makes landfall on Dauphin Island, Alabama with winds of 80 mph (130 km/h).[5]
  • 1800 UTC (2:00 p.m. EDT) – Hurricane Danny makes its final landfall at Mullet Point, Alabama with winds of 80 mph (130 km/h).[5]

July 20

  • 0000 UTC (8:00 p.m. EDT July 20) – Hurricane Danny weakens into a tropical storm.[5]
  • 1800 UTC (2:00 p.m. EDT) – Tropical Storm Danny weakens into a tropical depression.[5]

July 24

  • 1800 UTC (2:00 p.m. EDT) – Tropical Depression Danny strengthens into a tropical storm while over North Carolina.[5]

July 26

  • Around 2000 UTC (4:00 p.m EDT) – Tropical Storm Danny approaches within 30 miles of Nantucket, Massachusetts.[5]
  • 0600 UTC (2:00 a.m. EDT) – Tropical Storm Danny becomes extratropical.[5]

July 27

August

  • No storms in the month of August.

September

September 3

  • Tropical Depression Six forms while located about 1150 miles (1850 km) east of the southernmost Lesser Antilles.[7]
  • Tropical Depression Six strengthens into Tropical Storm Erika.[7]

September 4

  • Tropical Storm Erika strengthens into Hurricane Erika.[7]

September 6

  • Hurricane Erika comes within 85 miles (135 km) of the Lesser Antilles.[7]

September 7

  • Hurricane Erika strengthens into a category 2 hurricane.[7]
  • Hurricane Erika strengthens into a category 3 hurricane (major hurricane).[7]
Hurricane Erika near peak intensity.

September 10

  • Hurricane Erika passes within 350 miles (565 km) of Bermuda.[7]

September 12

  • Hurricane Erika weakens into a category 2 hurricane.[7]
  • Hurricane Erika weakens into a category 1 hurricane.[7]
  • Hurricane Erika weakens into a tropical storm.[7]

September 15

  • Tropical Storm Erika becomes extratropical while north of the Azores.[7]

September 19

  • The extratropical cyclone dissipated while within about 230 miles (370 km) southwest of Ireland.[7]

October

October 4

  • 1800 UTC (2 p.m. EDT) – Tropical Depression Seven forms north of Puerto Rico.[8]

October 5

  • 1800 UTC (2 p.m. EDT) – Tropical Depression Seven strengthens into Tropical Storm Fabian.[8]
Tropical Storm Fabian on August 7, 1997.

October 8

  • 1200 UTC(8 a.m. EDT) – Tropical Storm Fabian becomes extratropical.[8]

October 15

  • 0000 UTC (8 p.m. EDT October 14) – Tropical Depression Eight forms north of Hispaniola.[9]

October 16

Tropical Storm Grace on October 16, 1997
  • 0000 UTC (8 p.m. EDT October 14) – Tropical Depression Eight forms north of Hispaniola.[9]
  • 0000 UTC (8 p.m. EDT October 15) – Tropical Depression Eight strengthens into Tropical Storm Grace.[9]

October 17

  • 1200 UTC (8 a.m. EDT) – Tropical Storm Grace dissipates.[9]

November

  • No storms in the month of November.
November 30
  • The 1997 Atlantic hurricane season officially ends.

See also

References

Tropical cyclones of the 1997 Atlantic hurricane season
Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Scale
TD TS 1 2 3 4 5
Preceded by
1996
Atlantic hurricane seasons timelines
1997
Succeeded by
1998

Advertisements






Got something to say? Make a comment.
Your name
Your email address
Message