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Track map of all tropical cyclones during the 2008 Atlantic hurricane season

The 2008 Atlantic hurricane season was an active Atlantic hurricane season, during which seventeen tropical cyclones formed. The season officially began on June 1, 2008 and ended on November 30, dates which conventionally limit the period of each year when tropical cyclones tend to form in the Atlantic. However, the first storm of the season, Tropical Storm Arthur, developed one day before the official start of the season. This timeline documents tropical cyclone formations, strengthening, weakening, landfalls, extratropical transitions, as well as dissipations during the season. The timeline also includes information which was not operationally released, meaning that information from post-storm reviews by the National Hurricane Center, such as information on a storm that was not operationally warned upon.This season produced seventeen tropical depressions, of which sixteen became named storms; eight attained hurricane status, of which five became major hurricanes, a storm that ranks as a Category 3 or higher on the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Scale.[1]

Contents

Timeline of events

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May

May 30
Tropical Storm Arthur shortly after landfall.
May 31
  • 4 a.m. CDT (0900 UTC) – Tropical Storm Arthur makes landfall in northeastern Belize with winds of 45 mph (75 km/h).[2]

June

June 1
  • 12 a.m. EDT (0400 UTC) – The 2008 Atlantic hurricane season officially begins.
  • 7 a.m. CDT (1200 UTC) – Tropical Storm Arthur weakens to a tropical depression.[2]
  • 7 p.m. CDT (0000 UTC June 2) – Tropical Depression Arthur degenerates into an area of low pressure shortly before dissipating.[2]

July

July 3
  • 2 a.m. AST (0600 UTC) – Tropical Depression Two forms 255 miles (410 km) south-southeast of the Cape Verde Islands.[3]
  • 8 a.m. AST (1200 UTC) – Tropical Depression Two strengthens into Tropical Storm Bertha.[3]
July 7
  • 2 a.m. AST (0600 UTC) – Tropical Storm Bertha strengthens into a hurricane.[3]
  • 2 p.m. AST (1800 UTC) – Hurricane Bertha strengthens into a major hurricane—a storm with winds of 111 mph (178 km/h) or higher.[3]
July 8
Hurricane Bertha at peak intensity on July 7.
  • 8 a.m. AST (1200 UTC) – Hurricane Bertha weakens to a Category 2 hurricane.[3]
  • 2 p.m. AST (1800 UTC) – Hurricane Bertha weakens to a Category 1 hurricane.[3]
July 9
  • 2 p.m. AST (1800 UTC) – Hurricane Bertha re-strengthens into a Category 2 hurricane.[3]
July 10
  • 8 a.m. AST (1200 UTC) – Hurricane Bertha weakens to a Category 1 hurricane again.[3]
July 13
  • 8 a.m. AST (1200 UTC) – Hurricane Bertha weakens to a tropical storm.[3]
July 14
  • 2 p.m. AST (1800 UTC) – Tropical Storm Bertha makes its closest approach to land, passing within 35 miles (55 km) west of Bermuda.[3]
July 18
  • 2 p.m. AST (1800 UTC) – Tropical Storm Bertha re-strengthens into a hurricane.[3]
  • 8 p.m. EDT (0000 UTC July 19) – Tropical Depression Three forms 70 miles (110 km) east of the Georgia/South Carolina border.[4]
July 19
Tropical Storm Cristobal on July 22.
  • 8 a.m. EDT (1200 UTC) – Tropical Depression Three strengthens into Tropical Storm Cristobal.[4]
  • 8 p.m. AST (0000 UTC July 20) – Hurricane Bertha weakens to a tropical storm again.[3]
July 20
July 22
  • 7 p.m. CDT (0000 UTC July 23) – Tropical Storm Dolly strengthens into a hurricane.[5]
July 23
  • 8 a.m. EDT (1200 UTC) – Tropical Storm Cristobal dissipates as it is absorbed by a large extratropical cyclone.[4]
  • 9 a.m. CDT (1400 UTC) – Hurricane Dolly strengthens into a Category 2 hurricane and reaches its peak intensity with winds of 100 mph (160 km/h) and a minimum pressure of 963 mbar (hPa; 28.45 inHg).[5]
  • 1 p.m. CDT (1800 UTC) – Hurricane Dolly weakens to a Category 1 hurricane.[5]
  • 1:20 p.m. CDT (1820 UTC) – Hurricane Dolly makes landfall on South Padre Island, Texas with winds of 85 mph (150 km/h).[5]
  • 3 p.m. CDT (2000 UTC) – Hurricane Dolly makes landfall about 12 mi (19 km) south of Port Mansfield, Texas with winds of 80 mph (140 km/h).[5]
July 24
  • 1 a.m. CDT (0600 UTC) – Hurricane Dolly weakens to a tropical storm.[5]
  • 7 p.m. CDT (0000 UTC July 25) – Tropical Storm Dolly weakens to a tropical depression.[5]
July 25
  • 7 p.m. CDT (0000 UTC July 26) – Tropical Depression Dolly degenerates into an area of low pressure over northern Mexico.[5]

August

August 3
Tropical Storm Edouard on August 5.
August 5
  • 7 a.m. CDT (1200 UTC) – Tropical Storm Edouard makes landfall near Gilchrist, Texas with winds of 65 mph (100 km/h).[6]
  • 7 p.m. CDT (0000 UTC August 6) – Tropical Storm Edouard weakens to a tropical depression.[6]
August 6
  • 1 a.m. CDT (0600 UTC) – Tropical Depression Edouard degenerates into an area of low pressure.[6]
August 15
  • 8 a.m EDT (1200 UTC) – Tropical Depression Six forms just west of the northwestern tip of Puerto Rico.[7]
  • 10:30 a.m EDT (1430 UTC) – Tropical Depression Six makes its first landfall near El Cabo, Dominican Republic with winds of 40 mph (65 km/h).[7]
  • 2 p.m EDT (1800 UTC) – Tropical Depression Six is upgraded to Tropical Storm Fay.[7]
August 16
  • 7:45 a.m EDT (1145 UTC) – Tropical Storm Fay makes its second landfall along eastern Gonave Island, Haiti with winds of 45 mph (75 km/h).[7]
August 17
  • 5 a.m. EDT (0900 UTC) – Tropical Storm Fay makes its third landfall 20 miles east of Cabo Cruz, Cuba with 50 mph (85 km/h) winds.[7]
August 18
  • 3 a.m. EDT (0700 UTC) – Tropical Storm Fay makes its fourth landfall 20 miles west of Cienfuegos, Cuba with 50 mph (85 km/h) winds.[7]
  • 4:30 p.m. EDT (2030 UTC) – Tropical Storm Fay makes its fifth landfall in Key West, Florida with 60 mph (90 km/h) winds.[7]
August 19
  • 4:45 a.m. EDT (0845 UTC) – Tropical Storm Fay makes its sixth landfall just east of Cape Romano, Florida with 65 mph (100 km/h) winds.[7]
August 21
  • 3 p.m. EDT (1900 UTC) – Tropical Storm Fay makes its seventh landfall near Flagler Beach, Florida with 65 mph (100 km/h) winds.[7]
August 23
  • 2:15 a.m. EDT (0615 UTC) – Tropical Storm Fay makes its eighth landfall just southwest of Carrabelle, Florida with 50 mph (85 km/h) winds.[7]
  • 7 p.m. CDT (0000 UTC August 24) – Tropical Storm Fay weakens to a tropical depression.[7]
August 24
  • 8 p.m. EDT (0000 UTC August 25) – Tropical Depression Seven forms 110 mi (175 km) northeast of Bonaire.[8]
August 25
August 26
  • 2 a.m. EDT (0600 UTC) – Tropical Storm Gustav strengthens into a hurricane.[8]
  • 2 p.m. EDT (1800 UTC) – Hurricane Gustav makes its first landfall on the southwestern peninsula of Haiti with winds of 80 mph (130 km/h).[8]
  • 8 p.m. EDT (0000 UTC August 27) – Hurricane Gustav weakens to a tropical storm.[8]
August 27
  • 2 a.m. EDT (0600 UTC) – Tropical Depression Fay becomes extratropical over eastern Tennessee.[7]
  • 8 p.m. EDT (0000 UTC August 28) – Tropical Depression Eight forms 315 mi (510 km) east-northeast of the Lesser Antilles.[9]
August 28
  • 8 a.m. EDT (1200 UTC) – Tropical Depression Eight strengthens into Tropical Storm Hanna.[9]
  • 2 p.m. EDT (1800 UTC) – Tropical Storm Gustav makes its second landfall near Manchioneal, Jamaica with winds of 70 mph (110 km/h).[8]
  • 10 p.m. EDT (0000 UTC August 29) – Tropical Storm Gustav makes its third landfall near Lionel Town, Jamaica with winds of 70 mph (110 km/h).[8]
August 29
  • 2 p.m. EDT (1800 UTC) – Tropical Storm Gustav re-strengthens into a hurricane.[8]
August 30
  • 2 a.m. EDT (0600 UTC) – Hurricane Gustav strengthens into a Category 2 hurricane.[8]
  • 8 a.m. EDT (1200 UTC) – Hurricane Gustav strengthens into a major hurricane.[8]
  • 2 p.m. EDT (1800 UTC) – Hurricane Gustav strengthens into a Category 4 hurricane and makes landfall on the southeastern coast of the Isla de la Juventud, Cuba[8]
  • 6 p.m. EDT (2200 UTC) – Hurricane Gustav makes landfall near Los Palacios, Cuba at peak intensity with winds of 150 mph (240 km/h) with a minimum pressure of 941 mbar (hPa; 27.79 inHg).[8]
August 31
  • 2 a.m. EDT (0600 UTC) – Hurricane Gustav weakens to a Category 3 hurricane.[8]
  • 2 p.m. EDT (1800 UTC) – Hurricane Gustav weakens to a Category 2 hurricane.[8]

September

September 1
  • 2 a.m. AST (0600 UTC) – Tropical Depression Nine forms 775 mi (1,250 km) west of the Cape Verde Islands.[10]
  • 8 a.m. AST (1200 UTC) – Tropical Depression Nine strengthens into Tropical Storm Ike.[10]
  • 10 a.m. CDT (1500 UTC) – Hurricane Gustav makes its final landfall near Cocodrie, Louisiana with winds of 105 mph (165 km/h).[8]
  • 2 p.m. EDT (1800 UTC) – Tropical Storm Hanna strengthens into a hurricane.[9]
  • 7 p.m. CDT (0000 UTC) – Hurricane Gustav weakens to a tropical storm.[8]
  • 8 p.m. AST (0000 UTC September 2) – Tropical Depression Ten forms 315 mi (510 km) south-southeast of Sal, Cape Verde.[11]
  • 8 p.m. EDT (0000 UTC September 2) – Hurricane Hanna passes over the Caicos Islands at peak intensity with winds of 85 mph (140 km/h).[9]
September 2
  • 2 a.m. AST (0600 UTC) – Tropical Depression Ten strengthens into Tropical Storm Josephine.[11]
  • 7 a.m. CDT (1200 UTC) – Tropical Storm Gustav weakens to a tropical depression.[8]
  • 8 a.m. EDT (1200 UTC) – Hurricane Hanna weakens to a tropical storm.[9]
September 3
  • 2 p.m. AST (1800 UTC) – Tropical Storm Ike strengthens into a hurricane.[10]
  • 3 p.m. EDT (1900 UTC) – Tropical Storm Hanna passes over the Caicos Islands again with winds of 60 mph (95 km/h).[9]
  • 8 p.m. AST (0000 UTC September 4) – Hurricane Ike rapidly strengthens into a major hurricane.[10]
September 4
  • 2 a.m. AST (0600 UTC) – Hurricane Ike strengthens into a Category 4 hurricane and reaches its peak intensity with winds of 145 mph (230 km/h) with a minimum pressure of 935 mbar (hPa; 27.61 inHg) while located about 545 mi (880 km) northwest of Barbuda, becoming the strongest storm of the season.[10]
  • 7 a.m. CDT (1200 UTC) – Tropical Depression Gustav transitions into an extratropical cyclone over extreme north-central Arkansas.[8]
September 5
  • 8 a.m. AST (1200 UTC) – Hurricane Ike weakens to a Category 3 hurricane.[10]
  • 8 p.m. AST (0000 UTC September 6) – Tropical Storm Josephine weakens to a tropical depression.[11]
September 6
  • 2 a.m. AST (0600 UTC) – Tropical Depression Josephine degenerates into a remnant low pressure area.[11]
  • 3:20 a.m. EDT (0720 UTC) – Tropical Storm Hanna makes landfall near the North Carolina--South Carolina border with winds of 70 mph (110 km/h).[9]
  • 8 a.m. AST (1200 UTC) – Hurricane Ike weakens to a Category 2 hurricane.[10]
  • 2 p.m. AST (1800 UTC) – Hurricane Ike quickly re-strengthens into a Category 4 hurricane.[10]
September 7
  • 2 a.m. EDT (0600 UTC) – Tropical Storm Hanna transitions into an extratropical cyclone over New England.[9]
  • 2 a.m. AST (0600 UTC) – Hurricane Ike passes just south of the Turks and Caicos Islands with winds of 135 mph (215 km/h).[10]
  • 9 a.m. EDT (1300 UTC) – Hurricane Ike weakens to a Category 3 hurricane and passes over Great Inagua Island with winds of 125 mph (205 km/h).[10]
  • 8 p.m. EDT (0000 UTC September 8) – Hurricane Ike re-strengthens into a Category 4 hurricane.[10]
  • 10 p.m. EDT (0200 UTC September 8) – Hurricane Ike makes landfall near Cabo Lucrecia, Cuba with winds of 135 mph (215 km/h).[10]
September 8
  • 2 a.m. EDT (0600 UTC) – Hurricane Ike weakens to a Category 3 hurricane.[10]
  • 8 a.m. EDT (1200 UTC) – Hurricane Ike weakens to a Category 2 hurricane.[10]
  • 11 a.m. EDT (1500 UTC) – Hurricane Ike enters the Caribbean Sea and weakens to a Category 1 hurricane.[10]
September 9
  • 10 a.m. EDT (1400 UTC) – Hurricane Ike makes landfall near Punta La Capitana, Cuba with winds of 80 mph (130 km/h).[10]
September 10
  • 2 p.m. EDT (1800 UTC) – Hurricane Ike re-strengthens into a Category 2 hurricane.[10]
September 13
  • 2 a.m. CDT (0700 UTC) – Hurricane Ike makes its final landfall near Galveston, Texas with winds of 110 mph (175 km/h).[10]
  • 1 p.m. CDT (1800 UTC) – Hurricane Ike weakens to a tropical storm.[10]
September 14
  • 7 a.m. CDT (1200 UTC) – Tropical Storm Ike transitions into an extratropical cyclone over eastern Missouri.[10]
September 24
  • 8 p.m. AST (0000 UTC September 25) – Tropical Depression Eleven (not operationally classified as such) forms 115 mi (185 km) north of the Dominican Republic.[12]
September 25
September 27
  • 8 a.m. AST (1200 UTC) – Tropical Storm Kyle strengthens into a hurricane.[12]
September 28
  • 8 p.m. AST (0000 UTC September 29) – Hurricane Kyle makes landfall near Yarmouth, Nova Scotia with winds of 75 mph (120 km/h).[12]
September 29'
  • 2 a.m. AST (0600 UTC) – Hurricane Kyle transitions into an extratropical cyclone over Nova Scotia.[12]
  • 2 a.m. EDT (0600 UTC) – Subtropical Storm Laura forms in the Atlantic Ocean.[13]
September 30
  • 8 a.m. EDT (1200 UTC) – Subtropical Storm Laura is reclassified as Tropical Storm Laura. [13]

October

October 1
  • 8 a.m. AST (1200 UTC) – Tropical Storm Laura degenerates into a remnant low in the north-central Atlantic.[13]
October 5
October 6
October 7
  • 7 a.m. CDT (1200 UTC) – Tropical Storm Marco makes landfall near Misantla, Mexico with winds of 65 mph (100 km/h).[14]
  • 1 p.m. CDT (1800 UTC) – Tropical Storm Marco weakens to a tropical depression.[14]
  • 7 p.m. CDT (0000 UTC October 8) – Tropical Depression Marco dissipates over Mexico.[14]
October 12
  • 2 a.m. AST (0600 UTC) – Tropical Depression Fourteen (not operationally classified as such) forms 795 mi (1,280 km) west of the Cape Verde Islands.[15]
  • 8 a.m. AST (1200 UTC) – Tropical Depression Fourteen strengthens into Tropical Storm Nana.[15]
October 13
  • 8 a.m. AST (1200 UTC) – Tropical Storm Nana weakens to a tropical depression.[15]
  • 2 a.m. EDT (0600 UTC) – Tropical Depression Fifteen forms in the Caribbean Sea.[16]
Satellite image of a sprawling, broad and poorly defined hurricane in the eastern Caribbean. It obscures numerous islands.
Hurricane Omar on October 15
October 14
  • 8 a.m. AST (1200 UTC) – Tropical Depression Nana degenerates into a remnant low-pressure area over open waters.[15]
  • 8 a.m. EDT (1200 UTC) – Tropical Depression Sixteen forms 50 miles (80 km) northeast of the Honduras/Nicaragua border.[17]
  • 8 p.m. EDT (0000 UTC October 15) – Tropical Storm Omar strengthens into Hurricane Omar.[16]
October 15
  • 8:30 a.m. EDT (1230 UTC) – Tropical Depression Sixteen makes landfall near Punta Patuca, Honduras with winds of 30 mph (45 km/h).[17]
  • 8 p.m. EDT (0000 UTC October 16) – Hurricane Omar reaches Category 2 intensity.[16]
  • 8 p.m. EDT (0000 UTC October 16) – Tropical Depression Sixteen degenerates into an area of low pressure shortly before dissipating over the mountains of Honduras.[17]
October 16
  • 2 a.m. EDT (0600 UTC) – Hurricane Omar reaches Category 4 intensity.[16]
  • 2 a.m. EDT (1800 UTC) – Hurricane Omar weakens to Category 1 intensity.[16]
October 18
  • 8 p.m. EDT (0000 UTC October 18) – Hurricane Omar weakens to a tropical storm.[16]
  • 8 a.m. AST (1200 UTC) – Tropical Storm Omar degenerates into a remnant low.[16]

November

November 5
  • 4 p.m. EST (2100 UTC) – Tropical Depression Seventeen forms southeast of the Nicaragua/Honduras border.[18]
Map centered on the Caribbean Sea depicting a storm track that starts close to Honduras. It heads generally northward and eventually ends in the eastern Gulf of Mexico near Florida.
Track map of Hurricane Paloma
November 6
  • 1 a.m. EST (0600 UTC) – Tropical Depression Seventeen strengthens into Tropical Storm Paloma.[18]
  • 7 p.m. EST (0000 UTC November 7) – Tropical Storm Paloma strengthens into Hurricane Paloma.[18]
November 7
  • 7 p.m. EST (0000 UTC November 8) – Hurricane Paloma reaches Category 3 intensity.[18]
November 8
  • 7 a.m. EST (1200 UTC) – Hurricane Paloma reaches Category 4 intensity.[18]
  • 7 p.m. EST (0000 UTC November 9) – Hurricane Paloma weakens to Category 2 intensity.[18]
  • 8 p.m. EST (0100 UTC November 9) – Hurricane Paloma makes landfall near Santa Cruz del Sur, Cuba with 100 mph (160 km/h) winds.[18]
November 9
  • 1 a.m. EST (0600 UTC) – Hurricane Paloma weakens to a tropical storm.[18]
  • 1 p.m. EST (1800 UTC) – Tropical Storm Paloma weakens to a tropical depression.[18]
  • 7 p.m. EST (0000 UTC November 10) – Tropical Depression Paloma degenerates to a remnant low over Cuba.[18]
November 30
  • 12 p.m. EST (0500 UTC) – The 2008 Atlantic hurricane season officially ends.

See also

References

  1. ^ National Hurricane Center's Hurricane Specialists Unit (2008-12-01). "Atlantic Tropical Weather Summery for 2008". National Hurricane Center. http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/archive/2008/tws/MIATWSAT_nov.shtml?. Retrieved 2008-12-03.  
  2. ^ a b c d Eric S. Blake (2008-07-28). "Tropical Cyclone Report – Tropical Storm Arthur" (PDF). National Hurricane Center. http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/pdf/TCR-AL012008_Arthur.pdf. Retrieved 2008-11-22.  
  3. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m Jamie R. Rhome (2008-10-15). "Tropical Cyclone Report – Hurricane Bertha" (PDF). National Hurricane Center. http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/pdf/TCR-AL022008_Bertha.pdf. Retrieved 2008-11-22.  
  4. ^ a b c d Lixion A. Avila (2008-10-01). "Tropical Cyclone Report – Tropical Storm Cristobal" (PDF). National Hurricane Center. http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/pdf/TCR-AL032008_Cristobal.pdf. Retrieved 2008-11-22.  
  5. ^ a b c d e f g h i j Richard J. Pasch and Todd B. Kimberlain (2009-01-22). "Tropical Cyclone Report – Hurricane Dolly" (PDF). National Hurricane Center. http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/pdf/TCR-AL042008_Dolly.pdf. Retrieved 2009-01-27.  
  6. ^ a b c d e James L. Franklin (2008-11-14). "Tropical Cyclone Report – Tropical Storm Edouard" (PDF). National Hurricane Center. http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/pdf/TCR-AL052008_Edouard.pdf. Retrieved 2008-11-22.  
  7. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l Stacy R. Stewart and John L. Beven (2009-02-08). "Tropical Cyclone Report – Tropical Storm Fay". National Hurricane Center. http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/pdf/TCR-AL062008_Fay.pdf. Retrieved 2009-05-27.  
  8. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r John L. Beven II and Todd B. Kimberlain (2009-01-22). "Tropical Cyclone Report – Hurricane Gustav" (PDF). National Hurricane Center. http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/pdf/TCR-AL072008_Gustav.pdf. Retrieved 2009-01-27.  
  9. ^ a b c d e f g h Daniel P. Brown and Todd Kimberlain (2008-12-17). "Tropical Cyclone Report – Hurricane Hanna" (PDF). National Hurricane Center. http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/pdf/TCR-AL082008_Hanna.pdf. Retrieved 2008-12-18.  
  10. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t Robbie Berg (2009-01-23). "Tropical Cyclone Report – Hurricane Ike" (PDF). National Hurricane Center. http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/pdf/TCR-AL092008_Ike.pdf. Retrieved 2009-01-27.  
  11. ^ a b c d Eric S. Blake (2008-12-05). "Tropical Cyclone Report – Tropical Storm Josephine" (PDF). National Hurricane Center. http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/pdf/TCR-AL102008_Josephine.pdf. Retrieved 2008-12-06.  
  12. ^ a b c d e Lixion A. Avila (2008-12-05). "Tropical Cyclone Report – Hurricane Kyle" (PDF). National Hurricane Center. http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/pdf/TCR-AL112008_Kyle.pdf. Retrieved 2008-12-06.  
  13. ^ a b c Richard J. Pasch (2009-02-04). "Tropical Cyclone Report – Tropical Storm Laura". National Hurricane Center. http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/pdf/TCR-AL122008_Laura.pdf. Retrieved 2009-05-27.  
  14. ^ a b c d e James L. Franklin (2008-11-14). "Tropical Cyclone Report – Tropical Storm Marco" (PDF). National Hurricane Center. http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/pdf/TCR-AL132008_Marco.pdf. Retrieved 2008-11-22.  
  15. ^ a b c d Stacy R. Stewart (2008-12-03). "Tropical Cyclone Report – Tropical Storm Nana" (PDF). National Hurricane Center. http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/pdf/TCR-AL142008_Nana.pdf. Retrieved 2008-12-03.  
  16. ^ a b c d e f g h John L. Beven and Chris Landsea (2009-02-03). "Tropical Cyclone Report – Hurricane Omar". National Hurricane Center. http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/pdf/TCR-AL152008_Omar.pdf. Retrieved 2009-05-27.  
  17. ^ a b c Daniel P. Brown (2008-11-19). "Tropical Cyclone Report – Tropical Depression Sixteen" (PDF). National Hurricane Center. http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/pdf/TCR-AL162008_Sixteen.pdf. Retrieved 2008-11-22.  
  18. ^ a b c d e f g h i j Michael J. Brennan (2009-04-14). "Tropical Cyclone Report – Hurricane Paloma". National Hurricane Center. http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/pdf/TCR-AL172008_Paloma.pdf. Retrieved 2009-05-27.  
Preceded by
2007
Atlantic hurricane seasons timelines
2008
Succeeded by
2009

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