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Times Square – 42nd Street
NYCS-bull-trans-1.svg NYCS-bull-trans-2.svg NYCS-bull-trans-3.svg NYCS-bull-trans-7.svg NYCS-bull-trans-7d.svg NYCS-bull-trans-N.svg NYCS-bull-trans-Q.svg NYCS-bull-trans-R.svg NYCS-bull-trans-S.svg NYCS-bull-trans-W.svg
New York City Subway rapid transit station complex
NYC Subway Times Square.jpg
Station statistics
Address area of West 42nd Street, Broadway & 7th Avenue
New York, NY 10036
Borough Manhattan
Locale Times Square, Midtown Manhattan
Coordinates 40°45′22″N 73°59′13″W / 40.756°N 73.987°W / 40.756; -73.987Coordinates: 40°45′22″N 73°59′13″W / 40.756°N 73.987°W / 40.756; -73.987
Division A (IRT), B (BMT)
Line BMT Broadway Line
IRT 42nd Street Shuttle
IRT Broadway – Seventh Avenue Line
IRT Flushing Line
Services       1 all times (all times)
      2 all times (all times)
      3 all times (all times)
      7 all times (all times) <7>weekdays until 10:00 p.m., peak direction(weekdays until 10:00 p.m., peak direction)
      N all times (all times)
      Q all times (all times)
      R all except late nights (all except late nights)
      S all except late nights (all except late nights)
      W weekdays until 9:30 p.m. (weekdays until 9:30 p.m.)
System transfers A all times C all except late nights E all times at 42nd Street – Port Authority Bus Terminal (IND Eighth Avenue Line)
Connection
Levels 4
Other information
Accessible Handicapped/disabled access (all except 42nd Street Shuttle; passageway to 42nd Street – Port Authority Bus Terminal is not accessible)
Traffic
Passengers (2008) 60.881 million[1][2] (along with 42nd Street – Port Authority Bus Terminal) 4.06%
Rank 1 out of 422

Times Square – 42nd Street is the busiest station complex of the New York City Subway, joining four lines (three trunk lines plus the 42nd Street Shuttle), with a free transfer via a passageway to a fifth (42nd Street – Port Authority Bus Terminal on the IND Eighth Avenue Line (A C E). It lies under Times Square, at the intersection of 42nd Street, 7th Avenue and Broadway. The entire complex served 60,880,668 passengers in 2008.[1]

Contents


IRT 42nd Street Shuttle platforms

Times Square
NYCS-bull-trans-S.svg
New York City Subway rapid transit station
Shuttle Platform.jpg
Station statistics
Division A (IRT)
Line IRT 42nd Street Shuttle
Services       S all except late nights (all except late nights)
Structure Underground
Platforms Side platforms, island platform (all connected at north end)
Tracks 3
Other information
Opened October 27, 1904[3]
Station succession
Next north Tracks 1 and 3: (Terminal)
Track 4: 50th Street (no regular service)
Next south Grand Central: S all except late nights

Times Square was originally a local station called "42nd Street" on New York City's first subway in 1904. Since 1918 three shuttle tracks have served it; the southbound express track was removed and replaced by a temporary wooden platform for access to the original northbound express track. There is no track connection between the northbound local and the other two tracks anywhere along the shuttle. Platforms are located on both sides (at the old local platforms) and where the southbound express track was; all three platforms connect on the north (compass west) side. This walkway crosses the northbound local track on a bridge that can be lifted for the only access to that track, via a merge into the northbound IRT Broadway – Seventh Avenue Line local track along the original subway alignment (north of the current Broadway – Seventh Avenue Line station). This track merge is only used for overnight swaps and special railfan excursion trains. The other three tracks used to curve parallel to this one.

Because of the curvature on the platforms, gap fillers are used to bridge the gap between train and platform. An underpass which used to connect the original side platforms lies between the downtown local track and the two express and the uptown local tracks of the BMT Broadway Line, which runs perpendicular to the shuttle.

IRT Flushing Line platform

Times Square
NYCS-bull-trans-7.svg NYCS-bull-trans-7d.svg
New York City Subway rapid transit station
R62A's at Times Square.jpg
Station statistics
Division A (IRT)
Line IRT Flushing Line
Services       7 all times (all times) <7>weekdays until 10:00 p.m., peak direction(weekdays until 10:00 p.m., peak direction)
Structure Underground
Platforms 1 island platform
Tracks 2
Other information
Opened April 21, 1917
Accessible Handicapped/disabled access (Transfer accessible to IRT Broadway – 7th Avenue Line and BMT Broadway Line platforms only)
Station succession
Next north Fifth Avenue – Bryant Park: 7 all times <7>weekdays until 10:00 p.m., peak direction
Next south (Terminal): 7 all times <7>weekdays until 10:00 p.m., peak direction
34th Street: (future)


Next Handicapped/disabled access north Grand Central: 7 all times <7>weekdays until 10:00 p.m., peak direction
Next Handicapped/disabled access south (none)

Times Square is the terminal for all 7 service. It has one island platform between the two tracks located deep below West 41st Street. Stairs, escalators and an elevator along the platform lead to various mezzanines. There are "TS" tile mosaics along the station walls. An office is located at the north (compass east) end of the platform. An elevator was recently installed and connects with the Downtown IRT 7th Avenue platform and then the mezzanine.

The tracks continue south (compass west) beyond the station to an unused storage and layover area. The extension of the Flushing Line, under construction as of April 2009, has work being done to improve this stretch. Third rails will be added, and the tracks inspected or replaced before it is opened to revenue service.[4] The closed lower level platform at 42nd Street – Port Authority Bus Terminal on the IND Eighth Avenue Line currently blocks the line and is in the process of being removed.[5]

BMT Broadway Line platforms

Times Square – 42nd Street
NYCS-bull-trans-N.svg NYCS-bull-trans-Q.svg NYCS-bull-trans-R.svg NYCS-bull-trans-W.svg
New York City Subway rapid transit station
Mezzanine Fever II.jpg
Station statistics
Division B (BMT)
Line BMT Broadway Line
Services       N all times (all times)
      Q all times (all times)
      R all except late nights (all except late nights)
      W weekdays until 11:00 p.m. (weekdays until 11:00 p.m.)
Structure Underground
Platforms 2 island platforms
Tracks 4
Other information
Opened January 5, 1918[6]
Accessible Handicapped/disabled access (Transfer accessible to IRT Broadway – Seventh Avenue Line & IRT Flushing Line platforms only)
Station succession
Next north 49th Street (local): N all times R all except late nights W weekdays until 11:00 p.m.
57th Street (express): Q all times
Next south 34th Street – Herald Square: N all times Q all times R all except late nights W weekdays until 11:00 p.m.


Next Handicapped/disabled access north 49th Street: N all times R all except late nights W weekdays until 11:00 p.m. (in northbound direction only)
Queens Plaza: R all except late nights
Next Handicapped/disabled access south 34th Street – Herald Square: N all times Q all times R all except late nights W weekdays until 11:00 p.m.
The uptown platform

Times Square – 42nd Street is an express station with four tracks and two island platforms. Connections to the other lines are at the northern end of the platforms. This station received a minor overhaul in the late 1970s when MTA fixed the station's structure and the overhaul appearance, and it repaired staircases and platform edges, removed pedestrian ramps, and replaced lighting. In 2004-2006, the station received a major overhaul and repairs, including upgrading the station for ADA compliance and restoring the original late 1910s tiling. MTA repaired the staircases, retiled the walls, added new tiling on the floors, upgraded the station's lights and the public address system, installed ADA yellow safety treads along the platform edge, and installed new signs and new trackbeds in both directions.

The express tracks north of the station spread out to pass around a crossunder in the Times Square shuttle platforms. This crossunder was sealed off in the 1960s.

On June 1, 1940, the title of the Brooklyn–Manhattan Transit Corporation was passed to the City of New York, signifying the first phase of unification of New York's subway system with the Independent Subway System as well as eventual public operation of the entire system. (The Interborough Rapid Transit Company would be merged on June 15 of the same year.) At midnight, a ceremony commemorating the transfer, with five hundred people in attendance, was held at the Times Square station. The last BMT train had left the 57th Street station five minutes earlier. When the train arrived at Times Square, BMT president William S. Menden handed over his company's properties to Mayor Fiorello H. LaGuardia, who then gave them to New York City Board of Transportation chairman John H. Delaney. The Board of Transportation would operate the New York City Transit System until the New York City Transit Authority's creation in 1953.[7]

IRT Broadway – Seventh Avenue Line platforms

Times Square – 42nd Street
NYCS-bull-trans-1.svg NYCS-bull-trans-2.svg NYCS-bull-trans-3.svg
New York City Subway rapid transit station
Times Square-42nd Street (Broadway-Seventh Avenue Line).jpg
Station statistics
Division A (IRT)
Line IRT Broadway – Seventh Avenue Line
Services       1 all times (all times)
      2 all times (all times)
      3 all times (all times)
Structure Underground
Platforms 2 island platforms
Tracks 4
Other information
Opened July 1, 1918
Accessible Handicapped/disabled access (Transfer accessible to BMT Broadway Line and IRT Flushing Line platforms only)
Station succession
Next north 50th Street (local): 1 all times 2 late nights
72nd Street (express): 2 all except late nights 3 all times
Next south 34th Street – Penn Station: 1 all times 2 all times 3 all except late nights
(Terminal): 3 late nights


Next Handicapped/disabled access north 66th Street – Lincoln Center (local): 1 all times 2 late nights
72nd Street (express): 2 all except late nights 3 all times
Next Handicapped/disabled access south 34th Street – Penn Station: 1 all times 2 all times 3 all except late nights

Times Square – 42nd Street is an express station with four tracks and two island platforms. Access to the other lines is provided at the northern end and in the center of each platform. An elevator was recently installed and is now in operation but there are very few signs in the station complex that show where they are.

Just south of the station, a fifth center track begins, formed by a connection from each express track. This track splits back into the two express tracks just before 34th Street – Penn Station. This center track was used in the past for turning rush hour "Gap Trains", which would head back up to The Bronx rather than Lower Manhattan or Brooklyn. It is currently used for turning 3 trains, which terminate here during late nights.[8]

This section of line was the site of a 1928 wreck which killed 16 people, the second worst in New York City history.

The complex

The IRT platforms have been connected to each other as a transfer station as the lines opened: first between the 42nd Street Shuttle and the Broadway – 7th Avenue Line in 1918, then the transfer was incorporated with the Flushing Line in 1927. The free transfer between the IRT and BMT was added on July 1, 1948.[9] The block-long passageway that runs west to the 42nd Street – Port Authority Bus Terminal station on the IND Eighth Avenue Line was added within fare control in the mid-1980s. Since 1991, this passageway has contained a piece of public art inspired by the Burma-Shave ads; Norman B. Colp's The Commuter's Lament, or A Close Shave consists of a series of signs attached to the roof of the passageway, reading:

Overslept,
So tired.
If late,
Get fired.
Why bother?
Why the pain?
Just go home
Do it again.

with the last panel being a picture of a bed. The panels were part of an art project that was supposed to last only one year, but was never removed.[10]

This station has been undergoing total reconstruction in stages starting in 1994. The reconstruction included a new entryway on the south side of 42nd Street between Seventh Avenue and Broadway, featuring a bright neon and colored glass flashing sign with the train route symbols and the word "Subway". The street level fare control at this site features restored original "Times Square" mosaics from the Contract I station walls (now used by the shuttle), and both escalators and stairs lead into the complex. There are also similar renovated entrances on the northwest and southwest corners of Seventh Avenue and 42nd Street, the latter of which has both esclators and stairs, while the former has only stairs.

In 1999, a US$44 million renovation of the complex began. The goal is to reduce congestion and improve rider access, comfort and safety by improving visual lines and increasing pedestrian capacity. The main corridor is being widened 15 feet, and the number of sharp corners reduced; ADA compliance is being introduced with elevators; new escalators are being built; and other corridors are being widened. The mezzanine above the BMT Broadway Line, formerly a record shop, now features a large oval balcony looking over the trackway and has reduced the sense of claustrophobia described by many riders. In 2004, four unisex stall bathrooms were opened on the mezzanine between the IRT and BMT lines; they are staffed and maintained by employees of the Times Square Alliance, the local Business Improvement District. The record shop re-opened in 2007 on the south side of the IRT/BMT corridor.

The mezzanine has been a major featured spot for subway performers ever since the opening of the station. "Music Under New York" controls the spot, which is located by the escalators, opposite the shuttle to Grand Central. Musicians of all types, from musical saw to a brass band, perform there daily.

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Relative depths

References

  1. ^ a b "2008 Subway Ridership". New York Metropolitan Transportation Authority. http://www.mta.info/nyct/facts/ridership/ridership_sub.htm. Retrieved 2009-04-29. 
  2. ^ "2007 Ridership by Subway Station". New York Metropolitan Transportation Authority. http://www.mta.info/nyct/facts/ridership/ridership_sub_07.htm. Retrieved 2009-04-29. 
  3. ^ New York Times, Our Subway Open: 150,000 Try It, October 28, 1904
  4. ^ "View of Tunnel from station platform showing sign indicating no third rail power". http://www.nycsubway.org/perl/show?95602. Retrieved 2009-04-01. 
  5. ^ Mindlin, Alex (2008-04-20). "No Whoosh, No ‘All Aboard’". New York Times. http://www.nytimes.com/2008/04/20/nyregion/thecity/20port.html. Retrieved 2009-10-12. 
  6. ^ New York Times, Open New Subway to Times Square, January 6, 1918
  7. ^ Hood, Clifton (2004). 722 Miles: The Building of the Subways and How They Transformed New York (Centennial ed.). Johns Hopkins University Press. pp. 238–239. ISBN 0801880548. 
  8. ^ MTA New York City Transit (2008-07-24). "Service Enhancements on 3 Line". Press release. http://www.mta.info/mta/news/releases/?en=080724-NYCT109. Retrieved 2008-07-26. 
  9. ^ New York Times, Transfer Points Under Higher Fare, June 30, 1948, page 19
  10. ^ "Artwork: "The Commuter's Lament/A Close Shave", Norman B. Colp (1991)". http://www.nycsubway.org/perl/artwork_show?185. Retrieved 2008-10-22. 

External links


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