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For other uses of "Timothy," see Timothy (disambiguation).
Saint Timothy
Bishop
Born c. AD 17
Died c. AD 80, Ephesus
Venerated in Roman Catholic Church
Eastern Orthodox Churches
Oriental Orthodoxy
Anglican Communion
Lutheran Church
Feast January 22 (Eastern Christianity)
January 26 (Roman Catholic Church, Lutheranism)
January 24 (on some local calendars and among Traditional Roman Catholics)

Timothy (Greek: Τιμόθεος; Timótheos, meaning "honouring God"[1]) was a first-century Christian bishop who died about AD 80. The New Testament indicates that Timothy traveled with Saint Paul, who was also his mentor. He is addressed as the recipient of two Pauline epistles.

Life

Timothy is mentioned in the Bible at the time of Paul's second visit to Lystra, where Timothy is mentioned as a "disciple".[2] Paul, having been impressed by his "own son in the faith," arranged that he should become his companion, and personally circumcised him[3] even though his father was Greek because his mother was a Jewish Christian, so that he might be accepted by the Jews. He was ordained[4] and went with Paul in his journey through Phrygia, Galatia and Mysia; also to Troas, Philippi, Veria, and Corinth. His mother, Eunice, and his grandmother, Lois, are noted as eminent for their piety and faith,[5] which indicates that they may have also been Christians. Timothy is praised by Paul for his knowledge of the Scriptures, and is said to have been acquainted with the Scriptures since childhood.[6] Little is known about Timothy's father; only that he was Greek.[7]

According to later tradition, Paul ordained Timothy as bishop of Ephesus in the year 65, where he served for 15 years. In the year 80 (though some sources place the event during the year 97, with Timothy dying at age 80), Timothy tried to halt a pagan procession of idols, ceremonies, and songs. In response to his preaching of the gospel, the angry pagans beat him, dragged him through the streets, and stoned him to death. In the 4th century, his relics were transferred to the Church of the Holy Apostles in Constantinople.

Veneration

Timothy is venerated as a saint and martyr by the Eastern Orthodox Church and in addition as an apostle by the Greek Orthodox Church, with his feast day on 22 January. The Roman Catholic calendar of saints venerates Timothy together with Titus with a memorial on 26 January. In the General Roman Calendar of 1962, his feast, a third class, is kept on 24 January. Along with Titus and Silas, he is commemorated by the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America on 26 January. Timothy's feast is kept by the Lutheran Church - Missouri Synod on 24 January.

References

  1. ^ MFnames.com - Origin and Meaning of Timothy
  2. ^ Acts 16:1-2.
  3. ^ McGarvey on Acts 16: "Yet we see him in the case before us, circumcising Timothy with his own hand, and this 'on account of certain Jews who were in those quarters.'"
  4. ^ 1 Timothy 4:14
  5. ^ 2nd Timothy 1:5
  6. ^ 2nd Timothy 3:15
  7. ^ Acts 16:1.

For other uses of "Timothy," see Timothy (disambiguation).
Saint Timothy
Bishop
Born c. AD 17
Died c. AD 80, Ephesus
Venerated in Roman Catholic Church
Eastern Orthodox Churches
Oriental Orthodoxy
Anglican Communion
Lutheran Church
Feast January 22 (Eastern Christianity)
January 26 (Roman Catholic Church, Lutheranism)
January 24 (on some local calendars and among Traditional Roman Catholics)
Christianity portal

Timothy (Greek: Τιμόθεος; Timótheos, meaning "honouring God"[1]) was a first-century Christian bishop who died about AD 80. Evidence from the New Testament also has him functioning as coadjutor of Saint Paul.

Life

Timothy is mentioned in the Bible at the time of Paul's second visit to Lystra, where Timothy is mentioned as a "disciple".[2] Paul, having been impressed by his "own son in the faith," arranged that he should become his companion, and personally circumcised[3] him because his mother was of the Jewish faith, so that he might be accepted by the Jews. He was ordained[4] and went with Paul in his journey through Phrygia, Galatia and Mysia; also to Troas, Philippi, Veria, and Corinth. His mother, Eunice, and his grandmother, Lois, are noted as eminent for their piety and faith,[5] which indicates that they may have also been Christians. Timothy is praised by Paul for his knowledge of the Scriptures, and is said to have been acquainted with the Scriptures since childhood.[6] Little is known about Timothy's father; only that he was Greek.[7]

According to later tradition, Paul ordained Timothy as bishop of Ephesus in the year 65, where he served for 15 long years. In the year 80 (though some sources place the event during the year 97, with Timothy dying at age 80), Timothy tried to halt a pagan procession of idols, ceremonies, and songs. In response to his preaching of the gospel, the angry pagans beat him, dragged him through the streets, and stoned him to death. In the 4th century, his relics were transferred to the Church of the Holy Apostles in Constantinople.

Veneration

Timothy is venerated as a saint and martyr by the Eastern Orthodox Church and in addition as an apostle by the Greek Orthodox Church, with his feast day on 22 January. The Roman Catholic calendar of saints venerates Timothy together with Titus with a memorial on 26 January. In the General Roman Calendar of 1962, his feast, a third class, is kept on 24 January. Along with Titus and Silas, he is commemorated by the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America on 26 January. Timothy's feast is kept by the Lutheran Church - Missouri Synod on 24 January.

References

  1. ^ MFnames.com - Origin and Meaning of Timothy
  2. ^ Acts 16:1-2.
  3. ^ Covenant Theological Seminary
  4. ^ 1 Timothy 4:14
  5. ^ 2nd Timothy 1:5
  6. ^ 2nd Timothy 3:15
  7. ^ Acts 16:1.

Source material

Up to date as of January 22, 2010

From Wikisource

Timothy
disambiguation
This is a disambiguation page, which lists works which share the same title. If an article link referred you here, please consider editing it to point directly to the intended page.


Timothy may refer to:


1911 encyclopedia

Up to date as of January 14, 2010

From LoveToKnow 1911

TIMOTHY or Timotheus, in the Bible (Acts xvi. 1, xvii. 14, &c.), a Lycaonian, the son of a Gentile father and a Jewish mother, Eunice (2 Tim. i. 5), was born at Lystra, and was already a member of the Christian Church there at the time of Paul's second visit. He took the place formerly occupied by John Mark in Paul's company, and in deference to Jewish feeling was circumcised. He accompanied the apostle on many of his journeys, and was employed by him on important missions (1 Thess. iii. 2; I Cor. iv. 17, xvi. 10). Paul speaks of him as his "son," and this (see Phil. ii. 22) refers to loyal service rather than to spiritual parentage. He was especially interested in the Macedonian churches, which he helped to found. His name is associated with that of Paul in the opening salutations of both epistles to the Thessalonians, the second epistle to the Corinthians, and those to the Philippians and Colossians. He was, therefore, with Paul at Rome. At a later date he is mentioned in Heb. xiii. 23 as having undergone imprisonment, but as having been released. On the basis of the epistles of Paul to Timothy, Timothy is traditionally represented as bishop of Ephesus, and tradition also tells that he suffered under Domitian. His martyrdom is celebrated on the 24th of January in the Latin Church, on the 22nd in the Greek.

The apocryphal Ada Timothei (Greek and Latin) have been edited by Usener (Bonn, 1877); cf. Lipsius, Apokr. Apostelgeschichten (1884), 11.2.


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First Epistle to Timothy >>


Wiktionary

Up to date as of January 15, 2010

Definition from Wiktionary, a free dictionary

See also timothy

Contents

English

Etymology

From Ancient Greek Τιμόθεος (Timotheos) from τιμάω (timaō), I honour) + θεός (theos), god)

Proper noun

Singular
Timothy

Plural
-

Timothy

Wikipedia-logo.png Timothy on Wikipedia.Wikipedia
Wikisource-newberg-de.png Wikisource has an article on “Timothy”. Wikisource
Wiktionary has an Appendix listing books of the Bible

  1. (Biblical) Books in the New Testament of the Bible (1 Timothy and 2 Timothy), epistles to Timothy.
  2. (Biblical) A companion of Paul.
  3. A male given name of biblical origin, also borne by early Christian saints.

Quotations

  • 1611, King James Version of the Bible (Authorized Version), 1 Timothy 1:2:
    Unto Timothy, my own son in the faith: Grace, mercy, and peace, from God our Father and Jesus Christ our Lord.
  • 1867 William Brighty Rands, Shoemakers' Village, Strahan 1871, pages 89-90:
    The name Timothy was an inspiration of Cherry's own. - - - "Now then, TIMOTHY!" and this she said with a rapid forte crescendo movement which made her mother laugh and also with a jerk which spilt the milk on the little one's forehead. "Well, mother," says Cherry gaily, "I've christened him at all events." And Timothy being a distinctive name, and a scriptural one, it was retained as the appellative of this mite,
  • 1932 A. A. Milne, The Christopher Robin Verses: Cradle Song:
    O Timothy Tim / Has ten pink toes, / And ten pink toes / Has Timothy Tim.

Related terms

Translations


Bible wiki

Up to date as of January 23, 2010

From BibleWiki

Meaning: honouring God

A young disciple who was Paul's companion in many of his journeyings. His mother, Eunice, and his grandmother, Lois, are mentioned as eminent for their piety (2 Tim 1:5). We know nothing of his father but that he was a Greek (Acts 16:1).

He is first brought into notice at the time of Paul's second visit to Lystra (Acts 16:2), where he probably resided, and where it seems he was converted during Paul's first visit to that place (1 Tim 1:2; 2 Tim 3:11). The apostle having formed a high opinion of his "own son in the faith," arranged that he should become his companion (Acts 16:3), and took and circumcised him, so that he might conciliate the Jews.

He was designated to the office of an evangelist (1 Tim 4:14), and went with Paul in his journey through Phrygia, Galatia, and Mysia; also to Troas and Philippi and Berea (Acts 17:14). Thence he followed Paul to Athens, and was sent by him with Silas on a mission to Thessalonica (Acts 17:15; 1Thess 3:2). We next find him at Corinth (1Thess 1:1; 2 Thes 1:1) with Paul.

He passes now out of sight for a few years, and is again noticed as with the apostle at Ephesus (Acts 19:22), whence he is sent on a mission into Macedonia. He accompanied Paul afterwards into Asia (Acts 20:4), where he was with him for some time. When the apostle was a prisoner at Rome, Timothy joined him (Phil 1:1), where it appears he also suffered imprisonment (Heb 13:23). During the apostle's second imprisonment he wrote to Timothy, asking him to rejoin him as soon as possible, and to bring with him certain things which he had left at Troas, such as his cloak and parchments (2 Tim 4:13).

According to tradition, after the apostle's death he settled in Ephesus as his sphere of labour, and there found a martyr's grave.

This entry includes text from Easton's Bible Dictionary, 1897.

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