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Tipton County, Tennessee
Map of Tennessee highlighting Tipton County
Location in the state of Tennessee
Map of the U.S. highlighting Tennessee
Tennessee's location in the U.S.
Seat Covington
Largest city Covington
Area
 - Total
 - Land
 - Water

475 sq mi (1,230 km²)
459 sq mi (1,190 km²)
15 sq mi (40 km²), 3.23%
Population
 - (2000)
 - Density

51,271
112/sq mi (43/km²)
Founded Oct. 29, 1823
Time zone Central: UTC-6/-5

Tipton County is a county located on the western end of the U.S. state of Tennessee. As of 2000, the population was 51,271. Its county seat is Covington[1]. Tipton County is part of the Memphis, TN–MSAR Metropolitan Statistical Area, centered on Shelby County, which borders Tipton on the south.

Contents

Geography

The major north-south route, U.S. Highway 51, bisects Tipton County into a western half and eastern half, and passes through Covington. The western boundary of Tipton County is the Mississippi River, where Tennessee meets Arkansas; however, in several places where the river's course was altered by the 1812 New Madrid earthquake, the boundary still follows the old alignment of the river, with the result that a few of Tipton County's communities — including Reverie and Corona — are exclaved on the Arkansas side, rather than the Tennessee side, of the river.

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 475 square miles (1,230 km²), of which, 459 square miles (1,190 km²) of it is land and 15 square miles (40 km²) of it (3.23%) is water.

Tipton County is situated on the southeastern edge of the New Madrid Seismic Zone, an area with a high earthquake risk.

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Adjacent counties

History

Indian cultures

The Tipton Phase and some of its associated sites

From about 10,000 BCE, Paleo-Indians and later Archaic-Indians lived as communities of hunter-gatherers in the area that covers the modern day southern United States.[2][3] Approximately 800 CE to 1600 CE, the Mississippi River Delta was populated by tribes of the Mississippian culture, a mound-building Native American people that had developed in the late Woodland Indian period.[3][4]

The Tipton Phase people were a local expression of the Mississippian culture. They inhabited the region of modern day Tipton County during the time of first contact with Europeans, at the arrival of the de Soto Expedition. By the end of the Mississippian period the land was claimed and populated by the Chickasaw tribe.[5] The exact origins of the Chickasaw are uncertain.[6]

Around 1800, Europeans began settling the land east of the Mississippi River that was inhabited by the Chickasaw Indians for centuries prior to the arrival of Europeans. Chickasaw land in West Tennessee and southwestern Kentucky was ceded in the Jackson Purchase.[7] In 1818, both sides agreed to the transfer by signing the Treaty of Tuscaloosa.[8]

1811 and 1812 earthquakes

Due to topographic changes caused by the New Madrid earthquakes in 1811 and 1812, part of what is now Tipton County was cut off the state of Tennessee by a change in the course of the Mississippi River. The earthquake changed the course of the Mississippi River near the settlement of Reverie, Tennessee. The old riverbed is west of Reverie. The current river is east of Reverie. This puts Reverie on the Arkansas side, while most of the area of Tipton County is located east of the Mississippi River, the Tennessee side.[9]

Establishment

Tipton County was established on October 29, 1823 from parts of Shelby County, which borders Tipton County in the south. The land was derived from what previously had been Chickasaw Indian lands. The county was named for Jacob Tipton, father of Armistead Blevins, who supervised the organization of Shelby County. Tipton was killed by Native Americans in 1791 in a conflict over the Northwest Territory.[10]

19th century

Union fleet passing Fort Randolph (1865)

Early Mississippi River steamboat commerce flourished in Tipton County. In 1830, the community of Randolph, one of the earliest settlements in Tipton County, was the most important shipping point in Tennessee and an early rival of Memphis over commercial supremacy, but the fortunes declined in later years.[11] Two Civil War forts were built near the settlement because of its strategical location on top of the second Chickasaw Bluff of the Mississippi River, Fort Randolph and Fort Wright.[12][13]

The first rail service in Tipton County was established in December 1855, when the Memphis and Ohio Railroad completed the route from Memphis to Nashville, running through what is now Mason. The Memphis and Paducah Railroad completed the tracks to Covington in July 1873. A telegraph line between Memphis and Covington was opened in 1882. In 1894, Covington was connected to electricity. Forced water mains provided residents of Covington with water since 1898. In 1922, street paving began in the county seat and since 1929, residents of Covington have access to natural gas.[14]

In the South Main Historic District in Covington, about 50 residences from the late 1800's and the early 1900's are still intact.[14]

Demographics

Historical populations
Year Pop.  %±
1900 29,273
1910 29,459 0.6%
1920 30,258 2.7%
1930 27,498 −9.1%
1940 28,036 2.0%
1950 29,782 6.2%
1960 28,564 −4.1%
1970 28,001 −2.0%
1980 32,930 17.6%
1990 37,568 14.1%
2000 51,271 36.5%
Source: "Historical Decennial Census Population". USCB. http://www.census.gov/population/www/censusdata/hiscendata.html. 
Age pyramid Tipton County[15]

As of the census[16] of 2000, there were 51,271 people, 18,106 households, and 14,176 families residing in the county. The population density was 112 people per square mile (43/km²). There were 19,064 housing units at an average density of 42 per square mile (16/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 77.86% White, 19.90% Black or African American, 0.38% Native American, 0.37% Asian, 0.06% Pacific Islander, 0.38% from other races, and 1.04% from two or more races. 1.21% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. By 2005 1.6% of the county's population was Latino.

There were 18,106 households out of which 39.60% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 60.20% were married couples living together, 13.90% had a female householder with no husband present, and 21.70% were non-families. 18.70% of all households were made up of individuals and 7.40% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.78 and the average family size was 3.17.

In the county, the population was spread out with 29.30% under the age of 18, 8.60% from 18 to 24, 30.40% from 25 to 44, 21.80% from 45 to 64, and 9.90% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 34 years. For every 100 females there were 97.00 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 93.20 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $41,856, and the median income for a family was $46,807. Males had a median income of $35,611 versus $23,559 for females. The per capita income for the county was $17,952. About 10.30% of families and 12.10% of the population were below the poverty line, including 16.30% of those under age 18 and 17.70% of those age 65 or over.

In 2006, according to the U.S. Census Bureau population estimate, 57,380 people reside in 22,551 housing units in Tipton County. In comparison to a population of 51,271 in the year 2000, the county population increased by 11.9% in six years. 50.7% of the population in 2006 are female, 49.3% are male. Of the population in 2006, 79.2% are White, 18.8% are Black, .4% are of Native American or Alaska Native race and 1.6% are of another ethnicity.[17]

Parks and recreation

Cannon in front of the Nature Center & Veteran's Memorial in Covington. Marker in the background shows Nathan Bedford Forrest's last speech. (2007)

Tipton County Museum

The Tipton County Museum is located in Covington. The museum houses military displays and exhibits from the Civil War history of the county. Taxidermies of local species and mastodon bone fragments give insight into the natural history. Adjacent to the museum, a 20 acres (8 ha) park with a .5 miles (800 m) long walking trail can be found. Natural woodland and man-made wetlands house a few smaller local species like turtles and birds. The Veterans Memorial in front of the museum commemorates the soldiers from the county who lost their lives in wars. The museum is closed on Sundays and Mondays, admission to the museum and the park is free.[14][18]

County Parks

Several parks in the county invite visitors to enjoy nature.[14]

  • Atoka Community Park houses four softball fields. It was built in 1992.
  • Court Square Park is s city park with fountains and brick dedication walls.
  • Frazier Park is a 10 acres (4 ha) park with a .5 miles (800 m) fitness trail, playgrounds and ballfields.
  • Munford City Park hosts independence festivities every year.
  • Patriot Park as opened in 2004. Centerpiece is a A-4 Skyhawk attack bomber.
  • Poplar Park offers a covered picnic area, ball fields and a playground.
  • Shelton Park is a 1 acre (0.4 ha) landscaped garden park with gazebo and picnic tables.
  • Valentine Regional Park is a family park with picnic pavilion and playgrounds.

Cities and towns

Civil War exhibit in the Tipton County Museum (2008)

See also

References

  1. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. http://www.naco.org/Template.cfm?Section=Find_a_County&Template=/cffiles/counties/usamap.cfm. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  2. ^ Prentice, Guy (2003). "Pushmataha, Choctaw Indian Chief". Southeast Chronicles. http://www.nps.gov/history/seac/SoutheastChronicles/NISI/NISI%20Cultural%20Overview.htm. Retrieved 2008-02-11. 
  3. ^ a b Smith, Gerald P. (1996). Charles H. McNutt. ed. Prehistory of the Central Mississippi Valley. University of Alabama Press. pp. 97–118. ISBN 0-8173-0807-5. 
  4. ^ "History & Archaeology: Mississippian Period: Overview". The New Georgia Encyclopedia. 2002-10-03. http://www.georgiaencyclopedia.org/nge/Article.jsp?id=h-707. Retrieved 10 December 2008. 
  5. ^ Smith, Gerald P. (1990). David H. Dye and Sheryl Ann Cox. ed. Towns and Temples Along the Mississippi. University of Alabama Press. pp. 135–169. ISBN 0-8173-0455-X. 
  6. ^ Cushman, Horatio (1899). "Choctaw, Chickasaw, and Natchez". History of the Choctaw, Chickasaw and Natchez Indians. Norman, Oklahoma: University of Oklahoma Press. pp. 18–19. ISBN 0806131276. 
  7. ^ "Jackson Purchase". excerpt from The Kentucky Encyclopedia edited by John E. Kleber. 1992. http://www.utm.edu/departments/acadpro/library/departments/special_collections/wc_hist/jackpur.htm. Retrieved 2008-10-24. 
  8. ^ "Treaties". Tennessee Encyclopedia of History and Culture. http://tennesseeencyclopedia.net/imagegallery.php?EntryID=T111. Retrieved 2008-10-24. 
  9. ^ http://www.tnhistoryforkids.org/local/tipton www.tnhistoryforkids.org
  10. ^ Tipton County in the Tennessee Encyclopedia of History and Culture
  11. ^ Tennessee Historical Markers (8th ed.), Tennessee Historical Commission, 1996, ISBN 0874020212 
  12. ^ "TN Encyclopedia: Fort Wright". The Tennessee Encyclopedia of History and Culture. http://tennesseeencyclopedia.net/imagegallery.php?EntryID=F051. Retrieved 2008-10-05. 
  13. ^ Foote, A. H. (March 5, 1862). "The Evacuation of Columbus. The Town Reduced to a Heap of Ruins by the Rebels. Their Retreat to Fort Randolph (...) - (Dispatch from Flag-Officer Foote)". The New York Times. http://query.nytimes.com/mem/archive-free/pdf?_r=1&res=9C07E5DF1E3FEE34BC4D53DFB5668389679FDE. Retrieved 10 January 2009. 
  14. ^ a b c d Covington-Tipton County Community Guide, Covington, Tennessee: Tipton County Chamber of Commerce, 2005 
  15. ^ Based on 2000 census data
  16. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. http://factfinder.census.gov. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  17. ^ "Tipton County QuickFacts from the U.S. Census Bureau". U.S. Census Bureau. http://quickfacts.census.gov/qfd/states/47/47167.html. Retrieved 2008-10-04. 
  18. ^ "Tipton County Museum". Tipton County. http://tiptonco.com/museum.htm. Retrieved 2008-10-04. 

External links

Coordinates: 35°29′N 89°46′W / 35.49°N 89.76°W / 35.49; -89.76


Genealogy

Up to date as of February 01, 2010

From Familypedia

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Tipton County, Tennessee
Map
File:Map of Tennessee highlighting Tipton County.png
Location in the state of Tennessee
Map of the USA highlighting Tennessee
Tennessee's location in the USA
Statistics
Founded Oct. 29, 1823
Seat Covington
Largest City Covington
Area
 - Total
 - Land
 - Water

 sq mikm²)
 sq mi ( km²)
 sq mi ( km²), 3.23%
wikipedia:Population
 - (2000)
 - Density

51271
Time zone Central : UTC-6/-5
Tipton County is a county located on the western end of the U.S. state of Tennessee. As of 2000, the population was 51,271. Its county seat is Covington6. Since Tipton County borders on Shelby County on the south, Tipton County is part of the Memphis, Tennessee Metropolitan area.

Contents

Geography

The major north-south route, U.S. Highway 51, bisects Tipton County into a western half and eastern half, and passes through Covington.. The western boundary of Tipton County is the Mississippi River, where Tennessee meets Arkansas.

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 1,230 km² (475 sq mi). 1,190 km² (459 sq mi) of it is land and 40 km² (15 sq mi) of it (3.23%) is water.

Adjacent counties

Demographics

Year Population[1]
1900 29.273
1910 29.459
1920 30.258
1930 27.498
1940 28.036
1950 29.782
1960 28.564
1970 28.001
1980 32.930
1990 37.568
2000 51.271

As of the census² of 2000, there were 51,271 people, 18,106 households, and 14,176 families residing in the county. The population density was 43/km² (112/sq mi). There were 19,064 housing units at an average density of 16/km² (42/sq mi). The racial makeup of the county was 77.86% White, 19.90% Black or African American, 0.38% Native American, 0.37% Asian, 0.06% Pacific Islander, 0.38% from other races, and 1.04% from two or more races. 1.21% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. By 2005 1.6% of the county's population was Latino.

Age pyramid Tipton County[2]

There were 18,106 households out of which 39.60% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 60.20% were married couples living together, 13.90% had a female householder with no husband present, and 21.70% were non-families. 18.70% of all households were made up of individuals and 7.40% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.78 and the average family size was 3.17.

In the county, the population was spread out with 29.30% under the age of 18, 8.60% from 18 to 24, 30.40% from 25 to 44, 21.80% from 45 to 64, and 9.90% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 34 years. For every 100 females there were 97.00 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 93.20 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $41,856, and the median income for a family was $46,807. Males had a median income of $35,611 versus $23,559 for females. The per capita income for the county was $17,952. About 10.30% of families and 12.10% of the population were below the poverty line, including 16.30% of those under age 18 and 17.70% of those age 65 or over.

Cities and towns

See also

References

  1. ^ http://www.census.gov/population/www/censusdata/hiscendata.html Historical Decennial Census Population
  2. ^ Based on 2000 {{subst:#ifexist:census|[[census|]]|[[Wikipedia:census|]]}} data

External links

Coordinates: 35°29′N 89°46′W / 35.49, -89.76

This page uses content from the English language Wikipedia. The original content was at Tipton County, Tennessee. The list of authors can be seen in the page history. As with this Familypedia wiki, the content of Wikipedia is available under the Creative Commons License.
Facts about Tipton County, TennesseeRDF feed
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County of subdivision1 Tennessee  +
Short name Tipton County  +

This article uses material from the "Tipton County, Tennessee" article on the Genealogy wiki at Wikia and is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike License.

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