Titan A.E.: Wikis

  
  

Note: Many of our articles have direct quotes from sources you can cite, within the Wikipedia article! This article doesn't yet, but we're working on it! See more info or our list of citable articles.

Encyclopedia

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Titan A.E.
Directed by Don Bluth
Gary Goldman
Produced by Don Bluth
Gary Goldman
David Kirschner
Written by Screenplay:
Ben Edlund
John August
Joss Whedon
Story:
Hans Bauer
Randall McCormick
Starring Matt Damon
Bill Pullman
John Leguizamo
Nathan Lane
Janeane Garofalo
Drew Barrymore
Music by Graeme Revell
Studio Fox Animation Studios
Distributed by 20th Century Fox
Release date(s) June 16, 2000 (US)
Running time 94 min.
Country United States
Language English
Budget $75,000,000 (estimated)
Gross revenue $36,754,634

Titan A.E. is a 2000 animated post-apocalyptic science fiction adventure film directed by both Don Bluth and Gary Goldman. The title refers to the spacecraft that is central to the plot, with A.E. meaning "After Earth."

The film's animation technique combines traditional hand-drawn animation and extensive use of computer generated imagery. Its working title was Planet Ice. Even though the film was unsuccessful at the box office, it was well-received by audiences and critics alike and has since then become a cult film. It is also the final film made by Fox Animation Studios before its closure.

Contents

Summary

In 3028 A.D. humanity has deep space travel and interacted with several alien species; however, a human experimental discovery called "Project Titan" has caused the Drej, a species of pure energy, to become alarmed and attack the human race. As the Drej prepare to destroy Earth, Professor Sam Tucker, the lead researcher for "Project Titan", gives his son Cale (along with a broken toy/project/console called "TITAN PRO") a ring and sends Cale on one of the evacuation ships with his alien friend Tek the University Student. Meanwhile Sam Tucker takes the TITAN Pro and other members of his team fly the Titan spacecraft from Earth and into hyperspace. With Earth destroyed, the remainder of the human species become drifters and are generally ridiculed by other species.

Fifteen years after Earth's destruction, Cale, now working in a salvage yard in an asteroid belt called Tau 14, encounters the human Captain Joseph Korso, who requests Cale's help to find the Titan. Cale is initially reluctant but agrees when Korso activates Cale's ring to show a map on his hand leading to the Titan. The yard is attacked by Drej, and the two escape on Korso's ship, the Valkyrie. Cale is introduced to the other members of Korso's alien crew, including his sly first mate Preed, an astrogator called Gune, and a cranky female weapon expert named Stith. The only other human is co-pilot Akima, whom Cale finds himself immediately attracted to. Korso explains that Professor Tucker encoded a map in Cale's ring that will lead them to the Titan, which is humanity's only chance at having a real future. They travel to the planet Sesharrim, where the bat-like Gaoul race helps Cale to understand how to interpret the map, and discover the Titan to be hidden in the Andali Nebula. As the group is leaving, they are attacked by the Drej, and Cale and Akima are captured. The Drej eventually discard Akima, sending her off into space in a pod, while they extract the Titan map from Cale. Cale eventually escapes in a Drej fighter and regroups with the Valkyrie, learning that Akima's pod was located and she was recovered successfully. The Valkyrie is able to reach the human drifter colony called New Bangkok to make repairs and prepare for the final trip to the Titan, however, Cale and Akima overhear an argument between Korso and the Drej Queen, and discover that Korso and Preed are working with the Drej to try to destroy the Titan in exchange for money; they escape from the Valkyrie but Akima is shot by Preed in the chase. They are stranded on the colony as Korso and the rest continue to the Titan's location. With the help of the other humans, Cale and Akima repair and refit the Phoenix, one of the colony's derelict spaceships, and race off to find the Titan before the Valkyrie reaches it.

Amid the Andali Nebula's giant ice crystals, Cale and Akima find and board the Titan. During their exploration of the massive ship, they discover a holographic message left by Cale's now-deceased father and left the console TITAN PRO, which reveals the true nature of Project Titan and the Titan itself: the ship has the ability to create a completely new, Earth-like planet, and has stores of all the DNA of the animal and plant life that once lived on Earth. This ability to create a new planet from scratch is the reason that the Drej feared humanity's potential enough to destroy Earth. Cale's father also explains that in its escape from the destruction of Earth, the Titan has run out of power, and can't currently execute the process of creating a planet. Cale's father's message is interrupted by Korso, who has arrived with the Valkyrie and the rest of its crew.

Korso and Preed have disembarked, leaving Stith and Gune behind with the intent to get rid of them by planting a bomb inside Stith's wrist-communicator; Gune, however, discovers the detonator in time and throws it down a corridor, saving Stith but suffering serious injuries. Back aboard the Titan, Preed turns on Korso, revealing that after Korso and the Drej Queen fell out, the latter approached Preed with a deal to kill all the humans in exchange for his own life and a wealthy sum. A tussle ensues, and Korso kills Preed in combat. Korso then attempts to steal Cale's ring but falls over the edge of the bridge, disappearing into the depths of the ship below. Before Cale can recover, they learn the Drej are attacking the Titan, and gain the help of the other Valkyrie crew to defend it (including Gune, who unexpectedly recovered from his wounds in the meantime). Cale comes up with a plan; remembering Korso's advice that the Drej are pure energy, he could reconfigure the Titan's power system to harness that energy and start the planet-creation process. Unfortunately, one of three critical circuit breakers malfunctions, forcing Cale to go outside and activate it manually while Akima and Stith attempt to fight off the Drej. Korso reappears and offers to redeem himself by sacrificing his life to complete the circuit while Cale returns to the bridge to activate the Titan. With the ship active, the Drej are disintegrated and drawn into its engines, Korso is apparently electrocuted, and the ice field is used to create a new planet.

As Cale and Akima step onto the new planet, Cale decides to call it "Bob". The film ends with Cale and Akima romantically embracing each other, the surviving crew of the Valkyrie flying off, and other ships with human colonies approach "New Earth" (Planet Bob) to start their new lives. It is the year 16 A.E.

Cast of characters

  • Matt Damon as Cale Tucker, a 19-year-old human who is separated from his father moments before the destruction of Earth by the Drej fifteen years prior to the main film. He begins to resent his father and background for this, but eventually steps in to fight for his race. Animation supervised by Len Simon.
  • Drew Barrymore as Akima Kunimoto, the pilot of the Valkyrie. She works under Captain Korso and is determined to save the human race from extinction. Animation supervised by Len Simon.
  • Bill Pullman as Joseph Korso, the captain of the Valkyrie and once an ally of Cale's father (seen as one his subordinates during the prologue of the film). He heads a crew in searching for the Titan which will create a new home for the human race, but he betrays Cale for money from the Drej and seemingly because he believes the Drej cannot be beaten. As soon as Cale discovers their weakness, he gives his life to help destroy them. Animation supervised by Len Simon.
  • Mark Linn-Baker as Queen Drej, the leader of the Drej, and the main villain of the film. Her sole purpose is to extinguish the human race from the face of the universe. She is destroyed along with her entire race during the climax. She sounds similar to the aliens from Ultraman.
  • John Leguizamo as Gune, a Grepoan and Korso's eccentric scientist. While he looks the opposite, he is quite intelligent and even knows how to pilot the Valkyrie. Animation supervised by Troy Saliba.
  • Nathan Lane as Preed, Korso's first mate. An Akrennian - a race of batlike creatures - in his late 30s or early 40s who speaks with an English accent, he sarcastically jokes and has unrequited feelings for Akima. Like Korso, he has a weak point for money, demonstrated when he betrays his closest comrades to the Drej and is killed by Korso (who breaks his neck) for this. One of the more popular characters in the film, Preed quickly became an audience favorite. Described in the Ben Edlund 12/15/97 Goldenrod Production draft as a "fruit bat-faced alien" whose full name is Preedex Yoa. Animation supervised by Edison Goncalves.
  • Janeane Garofalo as Stith, a Kangaroo-like alien known as a Mantrin/Sogowan, who has a cranky, but lovable attitude. She is Korso's tough weapons handler. Animation supervised by Troy Saliba.
  • Ron Perlman as Professor Sam Tucker, Cale's father, who is forced to leave his son to hide the Titan ship from the Drej and is killed when he refuses to disclose the Titan's location to them.
  • Alex D. Linz as Young Cale, who appeared to be 5-years-old (saying that "he's older than four") when the destruction of Earth took place.
  • Tone Loc as Tek, he was a student of University, Sam Tucker's friend who cares for and raises Cale when the two are separated. At some point during the fifteen years between the destruction of Earth and the events of the movie he has gone totally blind. He decides to stay behind when the Drej attack Tau 14, saying to Cale that he'll 'read about him' after he finds the Titan. It is unknown if he survived or not. Animation supervised by Edison Goncalves.
  • Jim Breuer as The Cook, an alien who despises humans and treats Cale with nothing but contempt, he is killed by the Drej early on. The Ben Edlund 12/15/97 Goldenrod Production draft reveals his name to be 'It', though no mention of this is ever made in the film.
  • Jim Cummings as Chowquin, Cale's overseer on Tau 14. He also despises humans, and attempts to beat Cale up early on in the film, but is subdued by Korso.

Digital screening

Titan A.E. became the first major motion picture to take part in end-to-end digital cinema. On June 6, 2000, ten days before the movie was released, at the SuperComm 2000 tradeshow, the movie was projected simultaneously at the tradeshow in Atlanta, GA as well as a screen in Los Angeles, CA. It was sent to both screens from the 20th Century Fox production facilities in Los Angeles via a VPN.[1]

Reception

While Titan A.E. was met with quite a positive response—even receiving an Annie Award nomination for Best Animated Feature that it lost to Toy Story 2—the film ultimately flopped; it was a financial failure and as a result, after the film's failure, Fox Animation Studios was shut down. The film opened at #5, with only $9,376,845 for an average of only $3,430 from 2,734 theaters. The film then lost 60% of its audience in its second weekend, dropping to #8, with a gross of just $3,735,300 for an average of just $1,346 from 2,775 theaters. The film ended up grossing a mere $36,754,634 worldwide ($22,753,426 in the United States and Canada, and $14,001,208 in international markets).

A reason commonly given for the financial failure of Titan A.E. is its poor marketing with a poorly identified target audience. People were unsure, having seen trailers for the film, how the movie was special and whether it was intended for an older sci-fi fan crowd, or whether it was pitched more at children. This confusion was further increased by the mixture of people used to write and direct the production. Bluth added to the confusion when he stated during an interview with HBO's First Look, "This is not one of those cute, little kid musicals; this film is nothing but action". However, the film garners a 70% "fresh" rating among users at Rotten Tomatoes, in comparison to the 51% given by critics, and a "C+" at Box Office Mojo. Notably, though, film critic Roger Ebert enjoyed it, giving it 3.5/4 stars for its "rousing story", "largeness of spirit", and "lush galactic visuals [which] are beautiful in the same way photos by the Hubble Space Telescope are beautiful". He cited the Ice Rings sequence as "a perfect examine [sic] of what animation can do and live action cannot".[2]

Prequels

To tie in with the film, there were a series of prequel novels released, as well as a prequel comic book mini-series.

  • Cale's Story: the adventures of Cale, ending with the beginning of the film. The book chronicles Cale growing up on Vusstra, Tek's home planet, for ten years and having to move to a different place every time the Drej attack. It also reveals how Cale became resentful of his father's disappearance and how he came to despise drifter colonies.
  • Akima's Story: the adventures of Akima, ending with the beginning of the film. The book chronicles Akima's life aboard drifter colonies when she tries to be close to her family and how she trained to be a starship pilot after the Drej killed her grandmother and destroyed her most recent drifter colony. It also reveals whence Akima learned her karate skills, her encounter and friendship with Stith, and the reason for which she is desperate to find the Titan.
  • Sam's Story: a Dark Horse Comics prequel comic telling the story of Sam Tucker and his crew, and their quest to hide the Titan.

Soundtrack

  1. "Over My Head" — Lit
  2. "The End is Over" — Powerman 5000
  3. "Cosmic Castaway" — Electrasy
  4. "Everything Under the Stars" — Fun Lovin' Criminals
  5. "It's My Turn to Fly" — The Urge
  6. "Like Lovers (Holding On)" — Texas
  7. "Not Quite Paradise" — Bliss 66
  8. "Everybody's Going to the Moon" — Jamiroquai
  9. "Karma Slave" — Splashdown
  10. "Renegade Survivor" — The Wailing Souls
  11. "Down to Earth" — Luscious Jackson

Creed's song "Higher" was played in many of the theatrical trailers for Titan A.E., but the song did not appear either in the movie or on the soundtrack.

References

External links


Simple English

Titan A.E.
Directed by Don Bluth
Gary Goldman
Produced by Don Bluth
Gary Goldman
David Kirschner
Written by Screenplay:
Ben Edlund
John August
Joss Whedon
Story:
Hans Bauer
Randall McCormick
Starring Matt Damon
Bill Pullman
John Leguizamo
Nathan Lane
Janeane Garofalo
Drew Barrymore
Distributed by 20th Century Fox
Release date(s) June 16, 2000
Running time 94 min.
Language English
Budget $75,000,000 (estimated)
IMDb profile

Titan A.E. is a 2000 animated science fiction movie from Fox Animation Studios and Twentieth Century Fox. The name of the movie comes from the fictional spacecraft that is a main part of the plot. The A.E. meaning "After Earth." The movie was created using both hand-drawn animation and computer generated imagery.

Titan A.E. did not make much money in theaters. It made only $9,376,845 during its opening weekend, and a total of $22,753,426 in theaters.

Contents

Plot

In the year 3028 A.D., Earth is attacked by aliens called the Drej. They are made of pure energy. The Drej spacecraft destroys Earth with an energy beam just as hundreds of space vehicles leave the planet with the last of mankind on them. The secret Titan ship with Professor Sam Tucker aboard leaves at the same time, but not with the other vessels. One of the one of the people escaping the planet is Sam's young son Cale. Cale carries with him a ring given to him by his father.

Fifteen years later, Cale works on a salvage station. Cale hates his father for having disappeared on the Titan. Without a home planet, humans have become outer space drifters (people that move from place to place without a home). They are constantly treated badly by other races. A human captain named Joseph Korso and his pilot Akima seek out Cale. They tell him that he must help them find the Titan. They say that the ship has machinery that will create a new Earth. Doing this will bring humanity back together again. The Drej want to find the Titan so that they can destroy it.

With Korso's help, Cale learns that the ring his father gave to him can help him find the Titan. Before long, Cale and Akima find out that Korso is looking for the Titan in order to hand it over to the Drej. They escape from him but become stranded on a drifter colony. Cale and Akima repair one of the wrecked spacecraft at the colony. They use it to go to where the Titan has been hidden.

Inside the Titan, Cale and Akima learn that Professor Tucker had been one of the main people who designed the craft. The designers felt that the destruction of Earth would happen. Because of this, they gave the Titan the ability to create a new planet. They loaded it with the DNA of every living Earth plant and animal so they could repopulate the new world. Unfortunately, the ship had no energy left and they could not recreate the planet.

Korso finds and boards the Titan. He attacks Cale and Akima, but one of his men attacks him. Korso kills the man by breaking his neck, then fights with Cale. During the fight, Korso falls over a railing. Cale trying to save him but Korso slips from Cale's grip and falls to his apparent death. Akima, Cale and others from Korso's ship work together to defend the Titan against the Drej attack. Cale thinks that the energy that makes up the Drej and their ships may be used to power up the Titan's systems. Korso shows up again, but sacrifices himself repair a circuit breaker just as the Drej ship shoots an energy beam at the Titan. Using the power of the beam, the Titan powers up and takes all the Drej energy. The Drej are destroyed while the ship creates a new planet.

The movie ends with Akima and Cale standing on their new world. Akima wants to name the planet "New Earth," while Cale wants to name it "Bob." The final scene is of all the human coming to the planet named "New Earth [Planet Bob]."

Prequels

To tie in with the movie, there was a series of novels as well as a comic book mini-series that tell stories that take place before the movie.

  • Cale's Story told about Cale, ending with the beginning of the movie.
  • Akima's Story told about Akima, ending with the beginning of the movie.

The Dark Horse Comics comic told the story of Sam Tucker and his crew. It also told about them hiding the Titan.

Cast

  • Matt Damon — voice of Cale Tucker
  • Drew Barrymore — voice of Akima
  • Bill Pullman — voice of Capt. Joseph Korso
  • John Leguizamo — voice of Gune
  • Nathan Lane — voice of Preed
  • Janeane Garofalo — voice of Stith
  • Ron Perlman — voice of Professor Sam Tucker
  • Alex D. Linz — voice of Young Cale
  • Tone Loc — voice of Tek
  • Jim Breuer — voice of The Cook

Soundtrack

  1. "Over My Head" — Lit
  2. "The End is Over" — Powerman 5000
  3. "Cosmic Castaway" — Electrasy
  4. "Everything Under the Stars" — Fun Lovin' Criminals
  5. "It's My Turn to Fly" — The Urge
  6. "Like Lovers (Holding On)" — Texas
  7. "Not Quite Paradise" — Bliss 66
  8. "Everybody's Going to the Moon" — Jamiroquai
  9. "Karma Slave" — Splashdown
  10. "Renegade Survivor" — The Wailing Souls
  11. "Down to Earth" — Luscious Jackson

The Digital Screening

Titan A.E. became the first major movie to be digital from start to finish. On June 6 2000, before it was shown in theaters, the movie was in Atlanta, Georgia as well as in Los Angeles, California at the same time. The movie was sent to both screens from 20th Century Fox in Los Angeles using a private internet LAN line.[1]. This was the first time a major movie had been created, distributed and shown digitally.

Other websites

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:

References

  1. Qwest Digital Cinema white paper (pdf file)








Got something to say? Make a comment.
Your name
Your email address
Message