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Tlatoani (Classical Nahuatl: tlàtoāni pronounced [tɬaʔtoˈaːni]; plural tlàtòquê, [tɬaʔ.ˈtoʔ.keʔ]) is the Nahuatl term for the ruler of an altepetl, a pre-Hispanic state. The word literally means "speaker", but may be translated into English as "king".[1] A cihuātlàtoāni ([si.waː.tɬaʔ.to.ˈaː.ni]) is a female ruler, or queen regnant.[2]

The term quauhtlatoani refers to "provisional, interim, or at least non-dynastic rulers".[3] The leaders of the Mexica prior to their settlement are sometimes referred to as quauhtlatoque, as are those colonial rulers who were not descended from the ruling dynasty.

See also

Notes

  1. ^ Lockhart (2001, p.238); Schroeder (2007, p.3). See also the entry for "TLAHTOANI", in Wimmer (2006)
  2. ^ Schroeder (2007, pp.3–4). See also the entry for "CIHUATLAHTOANI" in Wimmer (2006).
  3. ^ Schroeder (1991, p. 188).

References

Berdan, Frances F.; Richard E. Blanton, Elizabeth Hill Boone, Mary G. Hodge, Michael E. Smith, and Emily Umberger (1996). Aztec Imperial Strategies. Washington, DC: Dumbarton Oaks Research Library and Collection. ISBN 0-88402-211-0. OCLC 27035231.  
Gibson, Charles (1964). The Aztecs Under Spanish Rule: A History of the Indians of the Valley of Mexico, 1519–1810 (Reprinted 1976 ed.). Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press. ISBN 0-8047-0196-2. OCLC 190295.  
Lockhart, James (2001). Nahuatl as Written: Lessons in Older Written Nahuatl, with Copious Examples and Texts. UCLA Latin American studies, vol. 88; Nahuatl studies series, no. 6. Stanford and Los Angeles: Stanford University Press and UCLA Latin American Center Publications. ISBN 0-8047-4282-0. OCLC 46858459.   (English) (Nahuatl)
Schroeder, Susan (1991). Chimalpahin and the Kingdoms of Chalco. Tucson: University of Arizona Press. ISBN 0-8165-1182-9. OCLC 21976206.  
Schroeder, Susan (2007). "The Annals of Chimalpahin". in James Lockhart, Lisa Sousa, and Stephanie Wood (eds.) (PDF e-book online publication). Sources and Methods for the Study of Postconquest Mesoamerican Ethnohistory (Provisional version ed.). Eugene: University of Oregon Wired Humanities Project. http://whp.uoregon.edu/Lockhart/Schroeder.pdf. Retrieved 2008-05-16.  
Wimmer, Alexis (2006). "Dictionnaire de la langue nahuatl classique" (online version, incorporating reproductions from Dictionnaire de la langue nahuatl ou mexicaine [1885], by Rémi Siméon). http://sites.estvideo.net/malinal/nahuatl.page.html.   (French) (Nahuatl)
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Simple English

Tlatoani (Classical Nahuatl: tlàtoāni pronounced [tɬaʔ.to.ˈaː.ni]; plural tlàtòquê, [tɬaʔ.ˈtoʔ.keʔ]) is the Nahuatl word for the ruler of an altepetl, a pre-Hispanic state. The word means "speaker", but may be translated into English as "king".[1] A cihuātlàtoāni ([si.waː.tɬaʔ.to.ˈaː.ni]) is a female ruler.[2]

References

  1. Lockhart (2001, p.238); Schroeder (2007, p.3). See also the entry for "TLAHTOANI", in Wimmer (2006)
  2. Schroeder (2007, pp.3–4). See also the entry for "CIHUATLAHTOANI" in Wimmer (2006).



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